blinkard

blinkard

(ˈblɪŋkɑːd)
n
1. taboo an idiot or stupid person
2. obsolete a person with bad eyesight
3. obsolete someone who blinks excessively
References in periodicals archive ?
A wayfarer like Cain, he eventually settles among a community of other Semites, the Hittites, who, as he learns their language and ways, tolerate his alterity: "The blinkard, they called him.
Specifically, Attoh Ahuma's Gold Coast Nation and National Consciousness, Casely Hayford's Ethiopia Unbound, and Kobina Sekyi's The Blinkards, form the focus of the analysis in this paper.
The Blinkards sought to draw awareness to the need maintain and uphold the traditions of the society and resist the infiltration of western values and/or the wholesale adoption of western cultures.
39) The Blinkards captures succinctly this fatality among the elite Gold Coasters who had despised their African ways of dressing, eating, worship, and celebration as well as indigenous political, social, economic, and educational arrangements.
Further, the root of identity or personality is also found in the inculcation of and strong attachment to one's cultural values, which is presented in Sekyi's The Blinkards.
The second chapter is James Gibbs' 'Seeking the founding father', which revisits the history of what is now generally accepted to be the first African literary play, The Blinkards, by the Ghanaian Kobina Sekyi.
87-90) his drama, The Blinkards (1915), and his short story The Anglo-Fanti (1918).
His collection of essays on the Ghanaian theatre with Nkyin-Kyin appeared in 2009, and his account of the first production of Kobina Sekyi's The Blinkards was included in African Theatre: Histories (2010).
Seeking the founding father: the story of Kobina Sekyi's The Blinkards, in Hutchison, Y.