blister beetle

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blister beetle

n.
Any of various beetles of the family Meloidae, such as the Spanish fly, that secrete cantharidin, a substance that blisters the skin and is toxic to livestock that consume hay contaminated with the beetles. Also called meloid.

blister beetle

n
(Animals) any beetle of the family Meloidae, many of which produce a secretion that blisters the skin. See also Spanish fly

blis′ter bee`tle


n.
any of various beetles of the family Meloidae, many of which produce a secretion capable of blistering the skin.
[1810–20]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blister beetle - beetle that produces a secretion that blisters the skinblister beetle - beetle that produces a secretion that blisters the skin
beetle - insect having biting mouthparts and front wings modified to form horny covers overlying the membranous rear wings
family Meloidae, Meloidae - blister beetles
oil beetle - any of various beetles that exude an oily substance from the leg joints that deters enemies
Spanish fly - green beetle of southern Europe
References in periodicals archive ?
Cantharidin is found in blister beetles, which feed on alfalfa and other crops that are in horse food.
Large populations of grasshoppers may lead to a corresponding increase in medically important blister beetle (Meloidae) populations since the larvae of blister beetles prey on the eggs of grasshoppers.
Despite the title, which depending on personal tastes can be a plus or a minus for a commuter read, the book gives clear accounts of a wide range of research beyond sex: insect personalities, wasp facial recognition, fruit flies artificially bred for intelligence, slavemaking ants, hitchhiking blister beetles and much more.
He talked of blister beetles and antibiotics and insect sex attractants.
Blister beetles and false blister beetles are medically important because they produce the chemical cantharidin that causes skin blistering.
Although this genus contains approximately 17% of all known species of meloids in the Nearctic (n = 410) (Pinto & Bologna 2002), little is known about many of these species of blister beetles.