bloating


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bloat

 (blōt)
v. bloat·ed, bloat·ing, bloats
v.tr.
1. To cause to swell up or inflate, as with liquid or gas.
2. To cure (fish) by soaking in brine and half-drying in smoke.
v.intr.
To become swollen or inflated: "Government had bloated out of control" (Lance Morrow).
n.
1. A swelling of the rumen or intestinal tract of cattle and domestic animals that is caused by excessive gas formation following fermentation of ingested watery legumes or green forage.
2. An excess or surfeit, as of employees, expenses, or procedures: corporate bloat.

[From Middle English blout, soft, puffed, from Old Norse blautr, soft, soaked; see bhleu- in Indo-European roots.]

bloating

(ˈbləʊtɪŋ)
n
a swollen state caused espy by gas retention inside the body
Translations

bloating

[ˈbləʊtɪŋ] n (= swelling) → ballonnements mpl

bloat

, bloating
n. distención abdominal, aventación;
vt. entumecerse, hincharse.

bloating

n distensión f abdominal, hinchazón f del estómago (fam)
References in periodicals archive ?
It aids digestion, reduces the feeling of "over fullness and discomfort" and eases bloating because it contains an enzyme called actinidin which helps digest proteins found in red meat, dairy and fish.
For many people, the lactose found in dairy products can cause bloating - as well as nausea, cramps, wind and abdominal pain.
Fibre softens the contents of the bowel and can really help if bloating is causing spasms.
Additionally, there was a highly statistically significant improvement in constipation-associated symptoms such as straining, cramping, bloating, rectal irritation and stool consistency when compared to baseline.
But for some people, bloating is more than an occasional inconvenience.
Normally flat stomachs feel like a balloon is about to pop and even the comfiest, baggiest clothes rest awkwardly across a swollen belly Andnow the season of over indulgence is just around the corner, bloating is more of an issue than at any other time of year as we stuff ourselves silly with the kind of food and drink which can cause the tight, swollen feeling in your tummy.
Excess wind Cut down on foods known to cause wind and bloating, such as beans, onions, broccoli, cabbage, sprouts and cauliflower.
Certain foods are far more likely to cause bloating and a pot belly.
Subsequently, weakened muscle contractions of the stomach result in abnormally slow movement of food through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, causing chronic symptoms of fullness, bloating, nausea or vomiting.