blockade


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Related to blockade: Blockade runner, military blockade

block·ade

 (blŏ-kād′)
n.
1. The isolation of a nation, area, city, or harbor by hostile ships or forces in order to prevent the entrance and exit of traffic and commerce.
2. The forces used to effect this isolation.
tr.v. block·ad·ed, block·ad·ing, block·ades
To set up a blockade against: blockaded the harbor.

[Probably block + -ade (as in barricade).]

block·ad′er n.

blockade

(blɒˈkeɪd)
n
1. (Military) military the interdiction of a nation's sea lines of communications, esp of an individual port by the use of sea power
2. something that prevents access or progress
3. (Pharmacology) med the inhibition of the effect of a hormone or a drug, a transport system, or the action of a nerve by a drug
vb (tr)
4. (Military) to impose a blockade on
5. to obstruct the way to
[C17: from block + -ade, as in ambuscade]
blockˈader n

block•ade

(blɒˈkeɪd)

n., v. -ad•ed, -ad•ing. n.
1. the closing off of a port, city, etc., by hostile ships or troops to prevent entrance or exit.
2. any obstruction of passage or progress.
3. interruption or inhibition of a normal physiological signal, as a nerve impulse.
v.t.
4. to subject to a blockade.
[1670–80]
block•ad′er, n.

blockade


Past participle: blockaded
Gerund: blockading

Imperative
blockade
blockade
Present
I blockade
you blockade
he/she/it blockades
we blockade
you blockade
they blockade
Preterite
I blockaded
you blockaded
he/she/it blockaded
we blockaded
you blockaded
they blockaded
Present Continuous
I am blockading
you are blockading
he/she/it is blockading
we are blockading
you are blockading
they are blockading
Present Perfect
I have blockaded
you have blockaded
he/she/it has blockaded
we have blockaded
you have blockaded
they have blockaded
Past Continuous
I was blockading
you were blockading
he/she/it was blockading
we were blockading
you were blockading
they were blockading
Past Perfect
I had blockaded
you had blockaded
he/she/it had blockaded
we had blockaded
you had blockaded
they had blockaded
Future
I will blockade
you will blockade
he/she/it will blockade
we will blockade
you will blockade
they will blockade
Future Perfect
I will have blockaded
you will have blockaded
he/she/it will have blockaded
we will have blockaded
you will have blockaded
they will have blockaded
Future Continuous
I will be blockading
you will be blockading
he/she/it will be blockading
we will be blockading
you will be blockading
they will be blockading
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been blockading
you have been blockading
he/she/it has been blockading
we have been blockading
you have been blockading
they have been blockading
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been blockading
you will have been blockading
he/she/it will have been blockading
we will have been blockading
you will have been blockading
they will have been blockading
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been blockading
you had been blockading
he/she/it had been blockading
we had been blockading
you had been blockading
they had been blockading
Conditional
I would blockade
you would blockade
he/she/it would blockade
we would blockade
you would blockade
they would blockade
Past Conditional
I would have blockaded
you would have blockaded
he/she/it would have blockaded
we would have blockaded
you would have blockaded
they would have blockaded
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blockade - a war measure that isolates some area of importance to the enemyblockade - a war measure that isolates some area of importance to the enemy
military action, action - a military engagement; "he saw action in Korea"
naval blockade - the interdiction of a nation's lines of communication at sea by the use of naval power
beleaguering, besieging, military blockade, siege - the action of an armed force that surrounds a fortified place and isolates it while continuing to attack
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
2.blockade - prevents access or progress
impedimenta, obstruction, obstructor, obstructer, impediment - any structure that makes progress difficult
Verb1.blockade - hinder or prevent the progress or accomplishment of; "His brother blocked him at every turn"
stonewall - obstruct or hinder any discussion; "Nixon stonewalled the Watergate investigation"; "When she doesn't like to face a problem, she simply stonewalls"
foreclose, forestall, preclude, prevent, forbid - keep from happening or arising; make impossible; "My sense of tact forbids an honest answer"; "Your role in the projects precludes your involvement in the competitive project"
filibuster - obstruct deliberately by delaying
check - block or impede (a player from the opposing team) in ice hockey
hang - prevent from reaching a verdict, of a jury
bottleneck - slow down or impede by creating an obstruction; "His laziness has bottlenecked our efforts to reform the system"
2.blockade - render unsuitable for passageblockade - render unsuitable for passage; "block the way"; "barricade the streets"; "stop the busy road"
obturate, occlude, close up, impede, obstruct, jam, block - block passage through; "obstruct the path"
block off, close off, shut off - block off the passage through; "We shut off the valve"
close - bar access to; "Due to the accident, the road had to be closed for several hours"
obstruct, block - shut out from view or get in the way so as to hide from sight; "The thick curtain blocked the action on the stage"; "The trees obstruct my view of the mountains"
3.blockade - obstruct access toblockade - obstruct access to      
obturate, occlude, close up, impede, obstruct, jam, block - block passage through; "obstruct the path"
4.blockade - impose a blockade on
besiege, circumvent, hem in, beleaguer, surround - surround so as to force to give up; "The Turks besieged Vienna"

blockade

noun
1. stoppage, block, barrier, restriction, obstacle, barricade, obstruction, impediment, hindrance, encirclement They agreed to lift their blockades of main roads
verb
1. bar, block, cut off, obstruct, shut off, barricade Truck drivers have blockaded roads to show their anger over driving regulations.

blockade

noun
A prolonged surrounding of an objective by hostile troops:
verb
To surround with hostile troops:
Idiom: lay siege to .
Translations
حصارحِصارٌيُحاصِرُ، يَفْرِضُ الحِصار
blokádablokovat
blokadeblokere
blokádblokád alá vesz
hafnbann; herkvíloka, teppa; halda í kví/hafnbanni
blokáda
blokadablokiratizapora
ablukaablukaya almakkuşatmakuşatmak

blockade

[blɒˈkeɪd]
A. N (Mil, Ind) → bloqueo m
to run a blockadeburlar un bloqueo
under blockadebloqueado
B. VT [+ traffic] → bloquear

blockade

[blɒˈkeɪd]
nblocus m
vt [+ port, city] → faire le blocus de; [+ road] → bloquer

blockade

n
(Mil) → Blockade f; under blockadeim Blockadezustand; to break or run the blockadedie Blockade brechen
(= barrier, obstruction)Sperre f, → Barrikade f

blockade

[blɒˈkeɪd]
1. n (Mil) → blocco
2. vtbloccare

block

(blok) noun
1. a flat-sided mass of wood or stone etc. blocks of stone.
2. a piece of wood used for certain purposes. a chopping-block.
3. a connected group of houses, offices etc. a block of flats; an office block.
4. a barrier. a road block.
5. (especially American) a group of buildings bounded by four streets. a walk round the block.
verb
to make (progress) difficult or impossible. The crashed cars blocked the road.
blocˈkade (-ˈkeid) noun
something which blocks every approach to a place by land or sea.
verb
The ships blockaded the town.
ˈblockage (-kidʒ) noun
something causing a pipe etc to be blocked. a blockage in the pipe.
blocked adjective
obstructed. I have a bad cold – my nose is blocked.
block capital/letter
a capital letter written in imitation of printed type, eg the letters in NAME.
ˈblockhead noun
a stupid person.
References in classic literature ?
For similar reasons I made no allusion to the skirmishing plates upon the floor; or to the disreputable appearance of the castors, which were all at sixes and sevens, and looked drunk; or to the further blockade of Traddles by wandering vegetable dishes and jugs.
Although La Rochelle was invested, however certain success might appear--thanks to the precautions taken, and above all to the dyke, which prevented the entrance of any vessel into the besieged city--the blockade might last a long time yet.
Monk had just declared himself in favor of the liberty of the Rump Parliament, a parliament which General Lambert, imitating Cromwell, whose lieutenant he had been, had just blocked up so closely, in order to bring it to his will, that no member, during all the blockade, was able to go out, and only one, Peter Wentworth, had been able to get in.
The next instant Bruin was at the foot of the tree; but, as this species of bear does not climb, he contented himself with turning the chase into a blockade.
Hundreds of dressed deodar logs had caught on a snag of rock, and the river was bringing down more logs every minute to complete the blockade.
And he told tales of blockade -long weeks of swaying at anchor, varied only by the departure and return of steamers that had used up their coal (there was no change for the sailing-ships); of gales and cold - cold that kept two hundred men, night and day, pounding and chopping at the ice on cable, blocks, and rigging, when the galley was as red-hot as the fort's shot, and men drank cocoa by the bucket.
And the streets are oriental--some of them three feet wide, some six, but only two that are over a dozen; a man can blockade the most of them by extending his body across them.
As for himself, he had never seen the blockade so complete; he heard his stomach sounding a parley, and he considered it very much out of place that evil destiny should capture his philosophy by famine.
But to blockade and watch a coastline is one thing, to blockade and watch the whole surface of a country is another, and cruisers and privateers are things that take long to make, that cannot be packed up and hidden and carried unostentatiously from point to point.
On the other side a brewery waggon was locking with the coal waggon, and an east-bound Kearny Street car, wildly clanging its gong, the motorman shouting defiance at the crossing policeman, was dashing forward to complete the blockade.
The general told me that the city was in a state of close blockade, and that all he could do was to give me a passport to the commander-in-chief of the rebels at Quilmes.
The oldest New Yorker among the thousands of spectators that lined the sidewalks had not witnessed a street blockade of the proportions of this one.