blockage

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block·age

 (blŏk′ĭj)
n.
1. The act of obstructing.
2. An obstruction.

blockage

(ˈblɒkɪdʒ)
n
1. the act of blocking or state of being blocked
2. an object causing an obstruction

block•age

(ˈblɒk ɪdʒ)

n.
1. an act of blocking.
2. the state of being blocked.
3. something that blocks; obstruction.
[1870–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blockage - the physical condition of blocking or filling a passage with an obstructionblockage - the physical condition of blocking or filling a passage with an obstruction
physical condition, physiological condition, physiological state - the condition or state of the body or bodily functions
ileus, intestinal obstruction - blockage of the intestine (especially the ileum) that prevents the contents of the intestine from passing to the lower bowel
tamponade, tamponage - blockage or closure (as of a wound or body cavity) by (or as if by) a tampon (especially to stop bleeding)
2.blockage - an obstruction in a pipe or tubeblockage - an obstruction in a pipe or tube; "we had to call a plumber to clear out the blockage in the drainpipe"
breech closer, breechblock - a metal block in breech-loading firearms that is withdrawn to insert a cartridge and replaced to close the breech before firing
impedimenta, obstruction, obstructor, obstructer, impediment - any structure that makes progress difficult
plug, stopple, stopper - blockage consisting of an object designed to fill a hole tightly
vapor lock, vapour lock - a stoppage in a pipeline caused by gas bubbles (especially a stoppage that develops in hot weather in an internal-combustion engine when fuel in the gas line boils and forms bubbles that block the flow of gasoline to the carburetor)
3.blockage - the act of blockingblockage - the act of blocking      
obstruction - the act of obstructing; "obstruction of justice"
implosion - the initial occluded phase of a stop consonant

blockage

noun obstruction, block, blocking, stoppage, impediment, occlusion The logical treatment is to remove the blockage.

blockage

noun
Something that impedes or prevents entry or passage:
Translations
اِنْسِدادانْسِداد
ucpání
blokeringproptilstopning
tukos
začepljenje
stífla
封鎖
봉쇄
zamašitev
blockering
การปิดล้อม
chướng ngại vật

blockage

[ˈblɒkɪdʒ] N (= obstruction) (Med) → obstrucción f; (in pipe) → atasco m

blockage

[ˈblɒkɪdʒ] nobstruction fblock and tackle npalan m
I finally pulled him up with a block and tackle → Je l'ai finalement sorti de là à l'aide d'un palan.block booking nréservation f groupée

blockage

nVerstopfung f; (in windpipe etc) → Blockade f; (= act)Blockierung f

blockage

[ˈblɒkɪdʒ] n (obstruction) → ingorgo (Med) → blocco

block

(blok) noun
1. a flat-sided mass of wood or stone etc. blocks of stone.
2. a piece of wood used for certain purposes. a chopping-block.
3. a connected group of houses, offices etc. a block of flats; an office block.
4. a barrier. a road block.
5. (especially American) a group of buildings bounded by four streets. a walk round the block.
verb
to make (progress) difficult or impossible. The crashed cars blocked the road.
blocˈkade (-ˈkeid) noun
something which blocks every approach to a place by land or sea.
verb
The ships blockaded the town.
ˈblockage (-kidʒ) noun
something causing a pipe etc to be blocked. a blockage in the pipe.
blocked adjective
obstructed. I have a bad cold – my nose is blocked.
block capital/letter
a capital letter written in imitation of printed type, eg the letters in NAME.
ˈblockhead noun
a stupid person.

blockage

اِنْسِداد ucpání blokering Verstopfung αποκλεισμός bloqueo, obstrucción tukos blocage začepljenje blocco 封鎖 봉쇄 verstopping blokkering blokada obstrução закупорка blockering การปิดล้อม tıkanıklık chướng ngại vật 封锁

blockage

n obstrucción f, bloqueo
References in periodicals archive ?
NYSE:MDT) today announced that the first patient was enrolled in the MAVErIC III Clinical Trial - the third in a series of studies to evaluate a system of devices to treat blockages in the carotid arteries that can lead to ischemic strokes.
This procedure also works on arterial blockages in the brain, scientists report in the May STROKE.
Utilizing laser angioplasty, interventional cardiologists are able to treat more complex disease, such as blockages longer than 20 millimeters, with a higher probability of success and with lower complication rates," Wall said.
He added, "Gaining rapid and reproducible true lumen access beyond the lesion is one of the keys in achieving high procedural success rates, especially in long femoral popliteal arterial blockages.
More than 500,000 people suffer strokes in the United States each year, but the number would be higher without a procedure in which surgeons clear blockages inside the carotid artery.
While surgically we can only go so high in the carotid artery, the balloon can go anywhere, giving us the ability to open blockages in less reachable areas," said Wholey.
As a result, the Rubicon Filter is designed with an ultra-low crossing profile providing cardiologists and interventional radiologists with the ability to deliver the Rubicon Filter past many blockages in blood vessels not previously navigable with other embolic protection filter delivery systems.
They recruited 40 people over the age of 50 who had at least two blockages in a key artery supplying the heart muscle and who were scheduled for heart surgery.
A few years ago, physicians inserting stents administered massive doses of heparin and other blood thinners to prevent blockages, but the drugs caused bleeding internally and at the entry site for the catheter carrying the stent.
Capturing 10 X-ray images each second, the scanner enables doctors to peer into pulsing coronary arteries and identify blockages with 95 percent accuracy.
Using a small balloon inflated inside the artery at the site of the blockage, physicians can open many blockages in a procedure called an angioplasty.
Unlike the initial blockages, which consist of a complex mixture of fatlike substances, debris from blood, and few intact cells, the new ones consist primarily of smooth muscle cells, which may overreact as they repair damage from the angioplasty, Speir explains.