blockhead

(redirected from blockheadedness)
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block·head

 (blŏk′hĕd′)
n.
A person regarded as very stupid; a dolt.

blockhead

(ˈblɒkˌhɛd)
n
derogatory a stupid person
ˈblockˌheaded adj
ˈblockˌheadedly adv
ˈblockˌheadedness n

block•head

(ˈblɒkˌhɛd)

n.
a stupid person; dunce.
[1540–50]
block′head`ed, adj.
block′head`ed•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blockhead - a stupid personblockhead - a stupid person; these words are used to express a low opinion of someone's intelligence
dolt, dullard, pillock, poor fish, pudden-head, pudding head, stupe, stupid, stupid person - a person who is not very bright; "The economy, stupid!"

blockhead

noun
A mentally dull person:
Translations
بَليد، غَليظُ الذِّهْن، غَبي
hlupákťulpas
idiottorsk
tökfejû
aulabárîur, heimskingi

blockhead

[ˈblɒkhed] N (pej) → zopenco/a m/f
you blockhead!¡imbécil!

blockhead

[ˈblɒkhɛd] nimbécile mfblock letters nplmajuscules fpl d'imprimerieblock vote n (British)vote m de délégation, vote m groupé

blockhead

[ˈblɒkˌhɛd] n (fam) → testa di legno

block

(blok) noun
1. a flat-sided mass of wood or stone etc. blocks of stone.
2. a piece of wood used for certain purposes. a chopping-block.
3. a connected group of houses, offices etc. a block of flats; an office block.
4. a barrier. a road block.
5. (especially American) a group of buildings bounded by four streets. a walk round the block.
verb
to make (progress) difficult or impossible. The crashed cars blocked the road.
blocˈkade (-ˈkeid) noun
something which blocks every approach to a place by land or sea.
verb
The ships blockaded the town.
ˈblockage (-kidʒ) noun
something causing a pipe etc to be blocked. a blockage in the pipe.
blocked adjective
obstructed. I have a bad cold – my nose is blocked.
block capital/letter
a capital letter written in imitation of printed type, eg the letters in NAME.
ˈblockhead noun
a stupid person.
References in periodicals archive ?
This blockheadedness is in a sense inevitable and can be positively useful.
She and her father shared an aversion to "blockheads," and Martha's frustration teaching her oldest son, Jeff, suggests that his mother thought he might, as a youngster, have had a touch of blockheadedness.
The boys' absolute blockheadedness, we take it, is supposed to drive the film's humor.