blocking


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

block

 (blŏk)
n.
1.
a. A solid piece of a hard substance, such as wood, having one or more flat sides.
b. Such a piece used as a construction member or as a support.
c. Such a piece upon which chopping or cutting is done: a butcher's block.
d. Such a piece upon which persons are beheaded.
e. One of a set of small wooden or plastic pieces, such as a cube, bar, or cylinder, used as a building toy.
f. Printing A large amount of text.
g. Sports A starting block.
2. A stand from which articles are displayed and sold at an auction: Many priceless antiques went on the block.
3. A mold or form on which an item is shaped or displayed: a hat block.
4. A substance, such as wood or stone, that has been prepared for engraving.
5.
a. A pulley or a system of pulleys set in a casing.
b. An engine block.
6. A bloc.
7. A set of like items, such as shares of stock, sold or handled as a unit.
8. A group of four or more unseparated postage stamps forming a rectangle.
9. Canadian A group of townships in an unsurveyed area.
10.
a. A usually rectangular section of a city or town bounded on each side by consecutive streets.
b. A segment of a street bounded by consecutive cross streets and including its buildings and inhabitants.
11. A large building divided into separate units, such as apartments.
12. A length of railroad track controlled by signals.
13. Something that obstructs; an obstacle: The disabled car formed a block in traffic.
14. The act of preventing someone or something from advancing, passing, or progressing, as:
a. Sports An act of bodily obstruction, as of a player or the ball.
b. Football An act of legally using one's body to obstruct or move a defensive player so that a player in possession of the ball may advance downfield, pass, or otherwise execute an offensive play.
15. Medicine Interruption or obstruction of a physiological function: nerve block.
16. Psychology A sudden cessation of speech or a thought process without an immediate observable cause, sometimes considered a consequence of repression. Also called mental block.
17. Slang The human head: threatened to knock my block off.
v. blocked, block·ing, blocks
v.tr.
1.
a. To stop or impede the passage of or movement through; obstruct: block traffic; mud that blocked the pipe.
b. To prevent from happening, succeeding, or progressing: blocked every attempt to reform the rules.
c. To shut out from view: a curtain blocking the stage.
d. To stop the passage of (a motion or bill) in a legislative assembly.
e. Sports To prevent or slow the movement of (an opponent) by using one's body, as by making a block in football.
f. Sports To stop or deflect (a ball or puck) by using one's body.
g. Medicine To interrupt or obstruct the functioning of (a physiological process), especially by the use of drugs.
h. Psychology To fail to remember.
2. To support, strengthen, or retain in place by means of a block.
3. To shape, mold, or form with or on a block: block a hat.
4. To indicate broadly without great detail; sketch. Often used with out: block out a plan of action; block out stage movements.
5. To run (trains) on a block system.
v.intr.
1. Sports
a. To obstruct the movement of an opponent by using one's body.
b. To stop or deflect a ball or puck by using one's body.
2. To suffer a mental block. Often used with on: I blocked on his name.
Phrasal Verb:
block out
1. To cover over so as to be illegible: block out sensitive information from a document before releasing it.
2. To repress (a traumatic event, for example) from conscious memory.
Idioms:
go on the block
To be offered for sale.
out of the blocks
From a starting position, as in a race or contest: The company has in the past been slow out of the blocks to adapt to consumer tastes.
put on the block
To offer for sale.

[Middle English blok, from Old French bloc, from Middle Dutch.]

block′er n.
Synonyms: block, hide1, obscure, obstruct, screen, shroud
These verbs mean to cut off from sight: a tree that blocked the view; a road hidden by brush; mist that obscured the mountain peak; skyscrapers obstructing the sky; a fence that screens the alley; a face shrouded by a heavy veil.

blocking

(ˈblɒkɪŋ)
n
1. (Electronics) electronics the interruption of anode current in a valve because of the application of a high negative voltage to the grid
2. (Communications & Information) internal congestion in a communication system that prevents the transmission of information
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blocking - the act of obstructing or deflecting someone's movementsblocking - the act of obstructing or deflecting someone's movements
obstruction - getting in someone's way
interference - (American football) blocking a player's path with your body; "he ran interference for the quarterback"
trap block - (American football) an illegal block
parry - (fencing) blocking a lunge or deflecting it with a circular motion of the sword
Translations

blocking

n (psych) bloqueo
References in classic literature ?
He was obliged to run hard to keep his blood moving at all--and then he came back to the station house and found a crowd blocking the street before the door
The night was not so pleasant as the evening, for it got chilly; and being put between two gentlemen (the rough-faced one and another) to prevent my tumbling off the coach, I was nearly smothered by their falling asleep, and completely blocking me up.
There were accidents to machinery, the liability of trains to run off the line, collisions, bad weather, the blocking up by snow--were not all these against Phileas Fogg?
The appearance of the third gendarme settled the matter, for a crowd of curious loungers was extended before him, effectually blocking the entrance to the hotel.
The Italian was surprised at my blocking the way and remarked pleasantly, "It's cold outside, Signor.
When one got right down to it, just what was the imaginary obstacle that was blocking the realization of this deep wish?
In a dense phalanx, blocking the streets from side to side, the crowd set forth, taking the route of Regent Street, Pall Mall, St.
On the evening of the fourth day he reached Nottingham Town, and there straightway divided his men into bands of six or seven, and sent them all through the countryside, blocking every highway and byway to the eastward and the southward and the westward of Sherwood.
Allow me, sir," said Prince Andrew in Russian in a cold, disagreeable tone to Prince Hippolyte who was blocking his path.
Mechanically she filled the gourds and, taking them up, turned slowly to retrace her steps to the boma only to voice immediately a half-stifled scream and shrank back from the menacing figure looming before her and blocking her way to the hut.
He was noted as a boxer, but he was regarded as an automaton, with the inhuman precision of a machine judging distance and timing blows, guarding, blocking, and stalling.
Joe was too busy living through the storm he had already caused, blocking, covering up, and ducking into the safety and respite of the clinches.