blood meal


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blood meal

n.
1. The dried and powdered blood of animals, used in animal feeds and as a nitrogen-rich fertilizer for plants.
2. The blood ingested in one feeding by a blood-sucking insect or arachnid such as a mosquito or tick.

blood′ meal`


n.
the dried blood of animals used as a fertilizer, diet supplement for livestock, or deer repellent.
[1885–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blood meal - the dried and powdered blood of animals
feed, provender - food for domestic livestock
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References in periodicals archive ?
When a mosquito takes a blood meal from another animal (such as a cat) the infective form of the larvae is injected into the a nimal.
The three groups were assigned to the three dietary treatments as T1 (control) - 0% Rumen content/ blood meal mixture (50:50), T2 (RB 10)- 10% Rumen content/ blood meal mixture (50:50) and T3 (RB 20) -20 % Rumen content/ blood meal mixture (50:50).
About two weeks later, when the mosquito takes its next blood meal, the progeny of these parasites mix with the mosquito's saliva and are injected into the person being bitten.
Female mosquitoes rely on their kidneys (called Malpighian tubules) when consuming a human blood meal.
While entomologists know that insects can get inebriated, the average mosquito blood meal from a person that's been drinking contains very little alcohol.
It was observed that females fed only on sugar also produced offsprings indicating autogeny in this Egyptian species as previously reported (16,17) depending on the availability of a suitable blood meal similar to the Tunisian and other strains (18,19), however, oocyte maturation is usually concordant with the digestion of a blood meal.
Then, following yet another blood meal, they mature into adults and go dormant during the winter months.
Midges need a blood meal within a week or they will not survive - and the weather has made it difficult for them to get that.
Female midges will mate and take a blood meal within 24hrs of hatching, repeating the feed every three to four days; the blood is required to allow eggs to mature.
After its skin has hardened, the nymph also finds a suitable host and takes a blood meal before falling off and maturing into an adult tick.
In this second edition, Lehane updates his 1991 edition with considerable information on feeding preference, host location, ingestion and management of the blood meal, host insect interactions, and parasite transmission.
His recommendation is to fertilize twice a year, in February and August, with one cup of the following mixture per plant: 8 parts alfalfa meal, 2 parts cottonseed meal, 2 parts rock phosphate, 2 parts bone meal, 1 part blood meal and 1 part Epsom salts.