blow


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blow 1

 (blō)
v. blew (blo͞o), blown (blōn), blow·ing, blows
v.intr.
1.
a. To be in a state of motion. Used of the air or of wind.
b. To move along or be carried by the wind: Her hat blew away.
c. To move with or have strong winds: The storm blew all night.
2.
a. To expel a current of air, as from the mouth or from a bellows.
b. To produce a sound by expelling a current of air, as in sounding a wind instrument or a whistle.
c. To breathe hard; pant.
d. To release air or gas suddenly; burst or explode: The tire blew when it hit the pothole.
e. To spout moist air from the blowhole. Used of a whale.
3.
a. To fail or break down, as from being operated under extreme or improper conditions: The furnace blew during the cold snap.
b. To melt or otherwise become disabled. Used of a fuse.
4.
a. Informal To move very fast in relation to something: The boy blew past the stands on his bike.
b. Slang To go away; depart: It's time to blow.
5. Informal To boast.
6. Vulgar Slang To be disgustingly disagreeable or offensive: This movie blows.
v.tr.
1.
a. To cause to move by means of a current of air: The wind blew the boat out to sea.
b. To drive a current of air on, in, or through: blew my hair dry after I shampooed it.
c. To clear out or make free of obstruction by forcing air through: blew his nose all through allergy season.
d. To shape or form (glass, for example) by forcing air or gas through at the end of a pipe.
2.
a. To expel (air) from the mouth.
b. To cause air or gas to be expelled suddenly from: We blew a tire when we drove over the rock.
3. Music
a. To cause (a wind instrument) to sound.
b. To sound: a bugle blowing taps.
4.
a. To cause to be out of breath.
b. To allow (a winded horse) to regain its breath.
5. To demolish by the force of an explosion: An artillery shell blew our headquarters apart.
6. To lay or deposit eggs in. Used of certain insects.
7.
a. To cause to fail or break down, as by operating at extreme or improper conditions: blew the engine on the last lap.
b. To cause (a fuse) to melt or become disabled.
8. Slang
a. To spend (money) freely and rashly. See Synonyms at waste.
b. To spend money freely on; treat: blew me to a sumptuous dinner.
9.
a. Slang To spoil or lose through ineptitude: blew the audition; blew a three-goal lead. See Synonyms at botch.
b. To cause (a covert intelligence operation or operative) to be revealed and thereby jeopardized: a story in the press that blew their cover; an agent who was blown by the opposition.
10.
a. Slang To depart (a place) in a great hurry: Let's blow this city no later than noon.
b. Baseball To throw (a pitch) so fast that a batter cannot swing fast enough to hit it: blew a fastball by the batter for the strikeout.
11. Vulgar Slang To perform fellatio on.
n.
1. The act or an instance of blowing.
2.
a. A blast of air or wind.
b. A storm.
3. Informal An act of bragging.
4. Slang Cocaine.
Phrasal Verbs:
blow away Slang
1. To kill by shooting, especially with a firearm.
2. To defeat decisively.
3. To affect intensely; overwhelm: That concert blew me away.
blow in Slang
To arrive, especially when unexpected.
blow off
1. To relieve or release (pressure); let off.
2. Slang To choose not to attend or accompany: They wanted us to come along, but we blew them off.
blow out
1. To extinguish or be extinguished by a gust of air: blow out a candle.
2. To fail, as an electrical apparatus.
3. To erupt in an uncontrolled manner. Used of a gas or oil well.
4. To defeat decisively, as in a sport.
blow over
To subside, wane, or pass over with little lasting effect: The storm blew over quickly. The scandal will soon blow over.
blow up
1. To come into being: A storm blew up.
2. To fill with air; inflate: blow up a tire.
3. To enlarge (a photographic image or print).
4. To explode: bombs blowing up.
5. To lose one's temper.
Idioms:
blow a fuse/gasket Slang
To explode with anger.
blow hot and cold
To change one's opinion often on a matter; vacillate.
blow off steam
To give vent to pent-up emotion.
blow (one's) cool Slang
To lose one's composure.
blow (one's) mind Slang
To affect with intense emotion, such as amazement, excitement, or shock.
blow (one's) top/stack Informal
To lose one's temper.
blow/break open
To get a sudden, insurmountable lead in (an athletic contest).
blow out of proportion
To make more of than is reasonable; exaggerate.
blow smoke
1. To speak deceptively.
2. To brag or exaggerate.

[Middle English blowen, from Old English blāwan; see bhlē- in Indo-European roots.]

blow 2

 (blō)
n.
1. A sudden hard stroke or hit, as with the fist or an object.
2. An unexpected shock or calamity.
3. An unexpected attack; an assault.

[Middle English blaw.]

blow 3

 (blō)
intr. & tr.v. blew (blo͞o), blown (blōn), blow·ing, blows
To bloom or cause to bloom.
n.
1. A mass of blossoms: peach blow.
2. The state of blossoming: tulips in full blow.

[From Middle English blowen, to bloom, from Old English blōwan; see bhel- in Indo-European roots.]

blow

(bləʊ)
vb, blows, blowing, blew or blownpast part blowed
1. (of a current of air, the wind, etc) to be or cause to be in motion
2. (intr) to move or be carried by or as if by wind or air: a feather blew in through the window.
3. to expel (air, cigarette smoke, etc) through the mouth or nose
4. to force or cause (air, dust, etc) to move (into, in, over, etc) by using an instrument or by expelling breath
5. (intr) to breathe hard; pant
6. (sometimes foll by up) to inflate with air or the breath
7. (intr) (of wind, a storm, etc) to make a roaring or whistling sound
8. to cause (a whistle, siren, etc) to sound by forcing air into it, as a signal, or (of a whistle, etc) to sound thus
9. (tr) to force air from the lungs through (the nose) to clear out mucus or obstructing matter
10. (often foll by: up, down, in, etc) to explode, break, or disintegrate completely: the bridge blew down in the gale.
11. (Electronics) electronics to burn out (a fuse, valve, etc) because of excessive current or (of a fuse, valve, etc) to burn out
12. blow a fuse slang to lose one's temper
13. (Zoology) (intr) (of a whale) to spout water or air from the lungs
14. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège) (tr) to wind (a horse) by making it run excessively
15. (Music, other) to cause (a wind instrument) to sound by forcing one's breath into the mouthpiece, or (of such an instrument) to sound in this way
16. (Jazz) (intr) jazz slang to play in a jam session
17. (Zoology) (intr) (of flies) to lay eggs (in)
18. (Crafts) to shape (glass, ornaments, etc) by forcing air or gas through the material when molten
19. (intr) chiefly Scot and Austral and NZ to boast or brag
20. (tr) slang
a. to spend (money) freely
b. US to treat or entertain
21. (tr) slang to use (an opportunity) ineffectively
22. slang to go suddenly away (from)
23. (tr) slang to expose or betray (a person or thing meant to be kept secret)
24. (tr) slang US to inhale (a drug)
25. (intr) slang to masturbate
26. informal another word for damn: I'll be blowed; blow it!.
27. (Chess & Draughts) draughts another word for huff4
28. blow hot and cold to vacillate
29. blow a kiss blow kisses to kiss one's hand, then blow across it as if to carry the kiss through the air to another person
30. blow one's own trumpet to boast of one's own skills or good qualities
31. blow someone's mind slang
a. (of a drug, esp LSD) to alter someone's mental state
b. esp US and Canadian to astound or surprise someone
32. (Recreational Drugs) (of a drug, esp LSD) to alter someone's mental state
33. esp US and Canadian to astound or surprise someone
34. blow one's top esp US and Canadian blow one's stack blow one's lid informal to lose one's temper
n
35. the act or an instance of blowing
36. the sound produced by blowing
37. a blast of air or wind
38. (Metallurgy) metallurgy
a. a stage in the Bessemer process in which air is blasted upwards through molten pig iron
b. the quantity of metal treated in a Bessemer converter
39. (Mining & Quarrying) mining
a. a rush of air into a mine
b. the collapse of a mine roof
40. (Jazz) jazz slang a jam session
41. (Recreational Drugs)
a. Brit a slang name for cannabis2
b. US a slang name for cocaine
[Old English blāwan, related to Old Norse blǣr gust of wind, Old High German blāen, Latin flāre]

blow

(bləʊ)
n
1. a powerful or heavy stroke with the fist, a weapon, etc
2. at one blow at a blow by or with only one action; all at one time
3. a sudden setback; unfortunate event: to come as a blow.
4. come to blows
a. to fight
b. to result in a fight
5. an attacking action: a blow for freedom.
6. Austral and NZ a stroke of the shears in sheep-shearing
[C15: probably of Germanic origin; compare Old High German bliuwan to beat]

blow

(bləʊ)
vb, blows, blowing, blew or blown
1. (Botany) (intr) (of a plant or flower) to blossom or open out
2. (tr) to produce (flowers)
n
3. a mass of blossoms
4. the state or period of blossoming (esp in the phrase in full blow)
[Old English blōwan; related to Old Frisian blōia to bloom, Old High German bluoen, Latin flōs flower; see bloom1]

blow1

(bloʊ)

n.
1. a sudden, hard stroke with a hand, fist, or weapon.
2. a sudden shock, calamity, reversal, etc.
3. a sudden attack or drastic action.
Idioms:
come to blows, to begin to fight, esp. physically.
[1425–75; late Middle English blaw, N form representing later blowe]

blow2

(bloʊ)

v. blew, blown or, for 24, blowed, blow•ing,
n. v.i.
1. (of the wind or air) to be in motion.
2. to move along, carried by or as if by the wind.
3. to produce or emit a current of air, as with the mouth or a bellows.
4. (of a horn, trumpet, etc.) to give out sound.
5. to make a blowing sound; whistle: The sirens blew at noon.
6. (of horses) to breathe hard or quickly; pant.
7. to boast; brag.
8. (of a whale) to spout.
9. (of a fuse, light bulb, tire, etc.) to stop functioning or be destroyed, as by bursting, exploding, or melting (often fol. by out).
10. Slang. to leave; depart.
v.t.
11. to drive by means of a current of air: A breeze blew dust into my eyes.
12. to drive a current of air upon.
13. to clear or empty by forcing air through: Try blowing your nose.
14. to shape (glass, smoke, etc.) with a current of air.
15. to cause to sound, as by a current of air: to blow a horn.
16. to cause to explode: A mine blew the ship to bits.
17. to cause or undergo the bursting, melting, burning, or disfunctioning of, as by strain or overload (often fol. by out): to blow a tire.
18. to cause to fall or collapse by a current of air; topple or demolish (usu. fol. by down, over, etc.): A windstorm blew down the tent.
19. to spread or make widely known: Growing panic blew the rumor about.
20. Informal.
a. to squander; spend quickly or extravagantly: I blew $100 on dinner.
b. to treat; bear the expense for: I'll blow you to a movie.
21. Informal.
a. to mishandle, ruin, or botch; bungle: You blew your last chance.
b. to waste or lose: The team blew the lead in the third quarter.
22. to damn: Blow the cost! Well, I'll be blowed!
23. to put (a horse) out of breath by fatigue.
24. Slang. to depart from: to blow town.
25. Vulgar Slang. to perform fellatio on.
26. blow away,
a. to kill, esp. by gunfire.
b. to defeat decisively; trounce.
c. to overwhelm with emotion, astonishment, etc.
27. blow in, to arrive at a place, esp. unexpectedly.
28. blow off, to disregard, ignore, or reject: He blew off their meeting.
29. blow out,
a. to extinguish or become extinguished.
b. to lose or cause to lose force or to cease: The storm has blown itself out.
c. (of an oil or gas well) to lose oil or gas uncontrollably.
30. blow over,
a. to pass away; subside: The storm blew over in minutes.
b. to be forgotten: The scandal will blow over eventually.
31. blow up,
a. to explode or cause to explode.
b. to exaggerate; enlarge.
c. to lose one's temper.
d. to fill with air or gas; inflate: to blow up a balloon.
e. to distend or become distended; swell.
f. to make an enlarged reproduction of (a photograph).
g. to come into being: A storm suddenly blew up.
n.
32. a blast of air or wind.
33. a violent windstorm.
34. an act of producing a blast of air, as in playing a wind instrument.
Idioms:
1. blow hot and cold, to favor and then reject something by turns; vacillate.
2. blow off steam, to reduce or release tension, as by loud talking.
3. blow one's cool, to lose one's composure.
4. blow one's cover, to divulge one's secret identity, esp. inadvertently.
5. blow one's mind, to overwhelm one, as with excitement, pleasure, or dismay.
6. blow one's stack or top, to become enraged; lose one's temper.
7. blow the lid off, to expose (scandal or illegal actions) to public view.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English blāwan; c. Old High German blā(h)an, Latin flāre to blow]

blow3

(bloʊ)

n., v. blew, blown, blow•ing. n.
1. a display of blossoms.
2. the state of blossoming: tulips in full blow.
v.i.
3. Archaic. to blossom; flower.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English blōwan]

Blow

 a quantity of steel dealt with at one time in a Bessemer converter, 1881.

blow


Past participle: blown
Gerund: blowing

Imperative
blow
blow
Present
I blow
you blow
he/she/it blows
we blow
you blow
they blow
Preterite
I blew
you blew
he/she/it blew
we blew
you blew
they blew
Present Continuous
I am blowing
you are blowing
he/she/it is blowing
we are blowing
you are blowing
they are blowing
Present Perfect
I have blown
you have blown
he/she/it has blown
we have blown
you have blown
they have blown
Past Continuous
I was blowing
you were blowing
he/she/it was blowing
we were blowing
you were blowing
they were blowing
Past Perfect
I had blown
you had blown
he/she/it had blown
we had blown
you had blown
they had blown
Future
I will blow
you will blow
he/she/it will blow
we will blow
you will blow
they will blow
Future Perfect
I will have blown
you will have blown
he/she/it will have blown
we will have blown
you will have blown
they will have blown
Future Continuous
I will be blowing
you will be blowing
he/she/it will be blowing
we will be blowing
you will be blowing
they will be blowing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been blowing
you have been blowing
he/she/it has been blowing
we have been blowing
you have been blowing
they have been blowing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been blowing
you will have been blowing
he/she/it will have been blowing
we will have been blowing
you will have been blowing
they will have been blowing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been blowing
you had been blowing
he/she/it had been blowing
we had been blowing
you had been blowing
they had been blowing
Conditional
I would blow
you would blow
he/she/it would blow
we would blow
you would blow
they would blow
Past Conditional
I would have blown
you would have blown
he/she/it would have blown
we would have blown
you would have blown
they would have blown
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blow - a powerful stroke with the fist or a weapon; "a blow on the head"
backhander - a backhanded blow
clip - a sharp slanting blow; "he gave me a clip on the ear"
whang, whack, knock, rap, belt - the act of hitting vigorously; "he gave the table a whack"
thwack - a hard blow with a flat object
smacking, slap, smack - the act of smacking something; a blow delivered with an open hand
smacker - a very powerful blow with the fist
knockdown - a blow that knocks the opponent off his feet
kayo, KO, knockout - a blow that renders the opponent unconscious
swat - a sharp blow
whiplash, lash, whip - a quick blow delivered with a whip or whiplike object; "the whip raised a red welt"
biff, punch, lick, clout, poke, slug - (boxing) a blow with the fist; "I gave him a clout on his nose"
box - a blow with the hand (usually on the ear); "I gave him a good box on the ear"
kick, kicking, boot - the act of delivering a blow with the foot; "he gave the ball a powerful kick"; "the team's kicking was excellent"
stroke - a single complete movement
fighting, combat, fight, scrap - the act of fighting; any contest or struggle; "a fight broke out at the hockey game"; "there was fighting in the streets"; "the unhappy couple got into a terrible scrap"
counterblow - a return blow; a retaliatory blow
swing - a sweeping blow or stroke; "he took a wild swing at my head"
knife thrust, stab, thrust - a strong blow with a knife or other sharp pointed instrument; "one strong stab to the heart killed him"
stinger - a sharp stinging blow
thump - a heavy blow with the hand
uppercut - a swinging blow directed upward (especially at an opponent's chin)
hammering, pounding, hammer, pound - the act of pounding (delivering repeated heavy blows); "the sudden hammer of fists caught him off guard"; "the pounding of feet on the hallway"
shot - a blow hard enough to cause injury; "he is still recovering from a shot to his leg"; "I caught him with a solid shot to the chin"
wallop - a severe blow
2.blow - an impact (as from a collision); "the bump threw him off the bicycle"
impact - the striking of one body against another
jolt, jounce, jar, shock - a sudden jarring impact; "the door closed with a jolt"; "all the jars and jolts were smoothed out by the shock absorbers"
concussion - any violent blow
rap, tap, strike - a gentle blow
bang, bash, smash, knock, belt - a vigorous blow; "the sudden knock floored him"; "he took a bash right in his face"; "he got a bang on the head"
buffeting, pounding - repeated heavy blows
sideswipe - a glancing blow from or on the side of something (especially motor vehicles)
slap, smack - a blow from a flat object (as an open hand)
3.blow - an unfortunate happening that hinders or impedesblow - an unfortunate happening that hinders or impedes; something that is thwarting or frustrating
happening, natural event, occurrence, occurrent - an event that happens
whammy - a serious or devastating setback
4.blow - an unpleasant or disappointing surprise; "it came as a shock to learn that he was injured"
surprise - a sudden unexpected event
blip - a sudden minor shock or meaningless interruption; "the market had one bad blip today"; "you can't react to the day-to-day blips"; "renewed jitters in the wake of a blip in retail sales"
5.blow - a strong current of airblow - a strong current of air; "the tree was bent almost double by the gust"
bluster - a violent gusty wind
sandblast - a blast of wind laden with sand
puff, puff of air, whiff - a short light gust of air
air current, current of air, wind - air moving (sometimes with considerable force) from an area of high pressure to an area of low pressure; "trees bent under the fierce winds"; "when there is no wind, row"; "the radioactivity was being swept upwards by the air current and out into the atmosphere"
6.blow - street names for cocaine
cocain, cocaine - a narcotic (alkaloid) extracted from coca leaves; used as a surface anesthetic or taken for pleasure; can become powerfully addictive
7.blow - forceful exhalation through the nose or mouth; "he gave his nose a loud blow"; "he blew out all the candles with a single puff"
breathing out, exhalation, expiration - the act of expelling air from the lungs
insufflation - an act of blowing or breathing on or into something
Verb1.blow - exhale hard; "blow on the soup to cool it down"
breathe out, exhale, expire - expel air; "Exhale when you lift the weight"
gasp, pant, puff, heave - breathe noisily, as when one is exhausted; "The runners reached the finish line, panting heavily"
chuff, huff, puff - blow hard and loudly; "he huffed and puffed as he made his way up the mountain"
insufflate - blow or breathe hard on or into
2.blow - be blowing or storming; "The wind blew from the West"
breeze - blow gently and lightly; "It breezes most evenings at the shore"
set in - blow toward the shore; "That gale could set in on us with the next high tide"
waft - blow gently; "A breeze wafted through the door"
storm - blow hard; "It was storming all night"
squall - blow in a squall; "When it squalls, a prudent sailor reefs his sails"
bluster - blow hard; be gusty, as of wind; "A southeaster blustered onshore"; "The flames blustered"
3.blow - free of obstruction by blowing air through; "blow one's nose"
eject, expel, release, exhaust, discharge - eliminate (a substance); "combustion products are exhausted in the engine"; "the plant releases a gas"
4.blow - be in motion due to some air or water currentblow - be in motion due to some air or water current; "The leaves were blowing in the wind"; "the boat drifted on the lake"; "The sailboat was adrift on the open sea"; "the shipwrecked boat drifted away from the shore"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
float - move lightly, as if suspended; "The dancer floated across the stage"
waft - be driven or carried along, as by the air; "Sounds wafted into the room"
tide - be carried with the tide
drift - cause to be carried by a current; "drift the boats downstream"
stream - to extend, wave or float outward, as if in the wind; "their manes streamed like stiff black pennants in the wind"
5.blow - make a sound as if blown; "The whistle blew"
blow - play or sound a wind instrument; "She blew the horn"
sound, go - make a certain noise or sound; "She went `Mmmmm'"; "The gun went `bang'"
6.blow - shape by blowing; "Blow a glass vase"
shape, form - give shape or form to; "shape the dough"; "form the young child's character"
7.blow - make a mess of, destroy or ruinblow - make a mess of, destroy or ruin; "I botched the dinner and we had to eat out"; "the pianist screwed up the difficult passage in the second movement"
go wrong, miscarry, fail - be unsuccessful; "Where do today's public schools fail?"; "The attempt to rescue the hostages failed miserably"
8.blow - spend thoughtlessly; throw away; "He wasted his inheritance on his insincere friends"; "You squandered the opportunity to get and advanced degree"
expend, use - use up, consume fully; "The legislature expended its time on school questions"
blow - spend lavishly or wastefully on; "He blew a lot of money on his new home theater"
burn - spend (significant amounts of money); "He has money to burn"
9.blow - spend lavishly or wastefully on; "He blew a lot of money on his new home theater"
expend, spend, drop - pay out; "spend money"
squander, waste, blow - spend thoughtlessly; throw away; "He wasted his inheritance on his insincere friends"; "You squandered the opportunity to get and advanced degree"
10.blow - sound by having air expelled through a tube; "The trumpets blew"
blow - play or sound a wind instrument; "She blew the horn"
sound, go - make a certain noise or sound; "She went `Mmmmm'"; "The gun went `bang'"
11.blow - play or sound a wind instrument; "She blew the horn"
blow - make a sound as if blown; "The whistle blew"
blow - sound by having air expelled through a tube; "The trumpets blew"
sound - cause to sound; "sound the bell"; "sound a certain note"
12.blow - provide sexual gratification through oral stimulation
excite, stir, stimulate - stir feelings in; "stimulate my appetite"; "excite the audience"; "stir emotions"
13.blow - cause air to go in, on, or through; "Blow my hair dry"
send, direct - cause to go somewhere; "The explosion sent the car flying in the air"; "She sent her children to camp"; "He directed all his energies into his dissertation"
blast - apply a draft or strong wind to to; "the air conditioning was blasting cold air at us"
14.blow - cause to move by means of an air current; "The wind blew the leaves around in the yard"
move, displace - cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense; "Move those boxes into the corner, please"; "I'm moving my money to another bank"; "The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant"
whiff - drive or carry as if by a puff of air; "The gust of air whiffed away the clouds"
15.blow - spout moist air from the blowhole; "The whales blew"
gush, spirt, spout, spurt - gush forth in a sudden stream or jet; "water gushed forth"
16.blow - leave; informal or rude; "shove off!"; "The children shoved along"; "Blow now!"
depart, go away, go - move away from a place into another direction; "Go away before I start to cry"; "The train departs at noon"
17.blow - lay eggs; "certain insects are said to blow"
lay, put down, repose - put in a horizontal position; "lay the books on the table"; "lay the patient carefully onto the bed"
18.blow - cause to be revealed and jeopardized; "The story blew their cover"; "The double agent was blown by the other side"
disclose, let on, divulge, expose, give away, let out, reveal, unwrap, discover, bring out, break - make known to the public information that was previously known only to a few people or that was meant to be kept a secret; "The auction house would not disclose the price at which the van Gogh had sold"; "The actress won't reveal how old she is"; "bring out the truth"; "he broke the news to her"; "unwrap the evidence in the murder case"
19.blow - show offblow - show off        
puff - speak in a blustering or scornful manner; "A puffing kind of man"
exaggerate, hyperbolise, hyperbolize, overstate, amplify, magnify, overdraw - to enlarge beyond bounds or the truth; "tended to romanticize and exaggerate this `gracious Old South' imagery"
crow, gloat, triumph - dwell on with satisfaction
20.blow - allow to regain its breath; "blow a horse"
rest - give a rest to; "He rested his bad leg"; "Rest the dogs for a moment"
21.blow - melt, break, or become otherwise unusable; "The lightbulbs blew out"; "The fuse blew"
conk out, go bad, break down, die, fail, give out, give way, break, go - stop operating or functioning; "The engine finally went"; "The car died on the road"; "The bus we travelled in broke down on the way to town"; "The coffee maker broke"; "The engine failed on the way to town"; "her eyesight went after the accident"
22.blow - burst suddenly; "The tire blew"; "We blew a tire"
burst, break open, split - come open suddenly and violently, as if from internal pressure; "The bubble burst"

blow

1
verb
1. gust, blast, puff A chill wind blew at the top of the hill.
2. move, carry, drive, bear, sweep, toss, fling, whisk, buffet, whirl, waft The wind blew her hair back from her forehead.
3. be carried, move, travel, flow, float, hover, flutter, whirl, waft, flit, flitter Leaves were blowing around in the wind.
4. exhale, breathe, pant, puff, breathe out, expel air Take a deep breath and blow.
5. puff out, expel, send out, emit, give out, breathe out He blew a ring of blue smoke.
6. play, sound, pipe, trumpet, blare, toot A saboteur blew a horn to distract the hounds.
7. unblock, clear, unclog He took out a handkerchief and blew his nose.
8. blast Rival gunmen blew the city to bits.
9. (Informal) spend, waste, squander, consume, run through, use up, dissipate, fritter away My brother lent me some money and I went and blew the lot.
10. (Informal) ruin, spoil, screw up (informal), botch, mess up, cock up (Brit. slang), fuck up (offensive taboo slang), make a mess of, muff, foul up, make a nonsense of (informal), bodge (informal), make a pig's ear of (informal), flub (U.S. slang), louse up (slang) Oh you fool! Now you've really blown your chances!
11. short-circuit, go, break, fuse, burn out The fuse blew as he pressed the button.
12. burst, puncture, split, explode, blow out, rupture The car tyre blew.
13. puff, breathe, pant, gasp, gulp, wheeze, exhale He ran from door to door, puffing and blowing.
blow over die down, end, pass, finish, cease, be forgotten, subside Wait, and it'll blow over.
blow someone away
1. bowl over, amaze, stun, stagger, astound, electrify (informal), stupefy, flabbergast She just totally blew me away with her singing.
2. open fire on, kill, blast (slang), bring down, zap (slang), pick off, pump full of lead (slang) He'd like to get hold of a gun and blow them all away.
blow something out put out, extinguish, snuff out I blew out the candle.
blow something up
1. explode, bomb, blast, dynamite, detonate, blow sky-high He was jailed for forty-five years for trying to blow up a plane.
2. inflate, pump up, fill, expand, swell, enlarge, puff up, distend Other than blowing up a tyre I haven't done any car maintenance.
3. exaggerate, heighten, enlarge on, inflate, embroider, magnify, amplify, overstate, embellish, blow out of (all) proportion, make a mountain out of a molehill, make a production out of, make a federal case of (U.S. informal), hyperbolize Newspapers blew up the story.
4. magnify, increase, extend, stretch, expand, widen, broaden, lengthen, amplify, elongate, dilate, make larger The image is blown up on a large screen.
blow up
1. explode, burst, go off, shatter, erupt, detonate The bomb blew up as they slept.
2. (Informal) lose your temper, rage, erupt, lose it (informal), crack up (informal), see red (informal), lose the plot (informal), become angry, go ballistic (slang, chiefly U.S.), hit the roof (informal), blow a fuse (slang, chiefly U.S.), fly off the handle (informal), become enraged, go off the deep end (informal), wig out (slang), go up the wall (slang), go crook (Austral. & N.Z. slang), flip your lid (slang) I'm sorry I blew up at you.
3. flare up, widen, heighten, enlarge, broaden, magnify, boil over The scandal blew up into a major political furore.
blow your top (Informal) lose your temper, explode, blow up (informal), lose it (informal), see red (informal), lose the plot (informal), have a fit (informal), throw a tantrum, fly off the handle (informal), go spare (Brit. slang), fly into a temper, flip your lid (slang), do your nut (Brit. slang) I just asked him why he was late and he blew his top.

blow

2
noun
1. knock, stroke, punch, belt (informal), bang, rap, bash (informal), sock (slang), smack, thump, buffet, clout (informal), whack, wallop (informal), slosh (Brit. slang), tonk (informal), clump (slang), clomp (slang) He went off to hospital after a blow to the face.
2. setback, shock, upset, disaster, reverse, disappointment, catastrophe, misfortune, jolt, bombshell, calamity, affliction, whammy (informal, chiefly U.S.), choker (informal), sucker punch, bummer (slang), bolt from the blue, comedown (informal) The ruling comes as a blow to environmentalists.

blow 1

verb
1. To be in a state of motion, as air:
2. To breathe hard:
3. To come open or fly apart suddenly and violently, as from internal pressure.Also used with out:
Slang: bust.
4. To release or cause to release energy suddenly and violently, especially with a loud noise.Also used with up:
5. Informal. To talk with excessive pride:
6. Slang. To move or proceed away from a place:
Slang: split, take off.
7. Slang. To spend (money) excessively and usually foolishly:
8. Slang. To pay for the food, drink, or entertainment of (another):
Informal: set up, stand.
Idiom: stand treat.
9. Slang. To harm irreparably through inept handling; make a mess:
Informal: bollix up, muck up.
Idiom: make a muck of.
phrasal verb
blow in
Slang. To come to a particular place:
phrasal verb
blow up
To be or become angry:
Informal: steam.
Idioms: blow a fuse, blow a gasket, blow one's stack, breathe fire, fly off the handle, get hot under the collar, hit the ceiling, lose one's temper, see red.
noun
1. A natural movement or current of air:
Archaic: gale.
2. Informal. An act of boasting:

blow 2

noun
1. A sudden sharp, powerful stroke:
Informal: bash, biff, bop, clip, wallop.
Slang: belt, conk, paste.
2. Something that jars the mind or emotions:
Psychiatry: trauma.

blow 3

verb
To bear flowers:
Translations
يَنْفُخُيَنْفُخُ، يَصْفُرُيَهُبُيَهُبُّ، يَعْصِفُصَدْمَةٌ، كارِثَةٌ
foukatúdervanoutvátzatroubit
blæsepusteslagsprænge
iskupuhaltaaräjähtääsuihkuttaatakaisku
puhatiudarac
fúj
áfallblásafeykjafjúkahögg
・・・に息を吐く吹く強打
강타불다
aizpūstiepūstlikteņa trieciensnopūstpūst
odfúknuťpribuchnúť
pihatipihnitirazstrelitiudarecupihniti
blåsaslag
เป่าถูกต่อยพัด
thổibayđòn đánhnổtẽn

blow

1 [bləʊ] N
1. (= hit) → golpe m; (= slap) → bofetada f
a blow with a hammer/fist/elbowun martillazo/un puñetazo/un codazo
at one blowde un solo golpe
a blow-by-blow accountuna narración pormenorizada
to cushion or soften the blow (lit) → amortiguar el golpe (fig) → disminuir los efectos (de un desastre etc)
to deal or strike sb a blowdar or asestar un golpe a algn
to strike a blow for freedom (fig) → dar un paso más hacia la libertad
without striking a blowsin violencia
to come to blows (lit, fig) → llegar a las manos
2. (fig) (= setback) → golpe m
it is a cruel blow for everybodyes un golpe cruel para todos
the news came as a great blowla noticia fue un duro golpe
that's a blow!¡qué lástima!
the affair was a blow to his pridela cosa le hirió en el amor propio
it was the final blow to our hopesacabó de echar por tierra nuestras esperanzas

blow

2 [bləʊ] (blew (pt) (blown (pp)))
A. VT
1. (= move by blowing) [wind etc] [+ leaves papers] → hacer volar
the wind blew the ship towards the coastel viento llevó or empujó el barco hacia la costa
the wind has blown dust all over itel viento lo ha cubierto de polvo
the wind blew the door shutel viento cerró la puerta de golpe
to blow sb a kissenviar or tirar un beso a algn
2. [+ trumpet, whistle] → tocar, sonar; [+ glass] → soplar; [+ egg] → vaciar (soplando)
to blow bubbles (soap) → hacer pompas; (gum) → hacer globos
to blow one's nosesonarse (la nariz)
to blow smoke in sb's face or eyes (lit) → echar el humo en la cara or los ojos a algn (US) (fig) → engañar a algn
to blow smoke ringshacer anillos or aros de humo
to blow smoke up sb's ass (US) → lamer el culo a algn, dar coba a algn
to blow one's own trumpet; blow one's own horn (US) → darse bombo
to blow the whistle on sth/sbdar la voz de alarma sobre algo/algn
3. (= burn out, explode) [+ fuse] → fundir, quemar; [+ tyre] → reventar; [+ safe etc] → volar
to blow sth sky-highvolar algo en mil pedazos
to blow a theory sky-highechar por tierra una teoría
to blow a matter wide opendestapar un asunto
to blow the lid off sthsacar a la luz algo, dejar algo al descubierto
to blow sb's minddejar alucinado a algn
to blow one's top; blow one's cork or stack (US) → reventar, estallar
to blow sth out of the waterechar por tierra algo, dar al traste con algo
4. (= spoil, ruin)
to blow one's chance of doing sthechar a perder or desperdiciar la oportunidad de hacer algo
to blow sb's coverdesenmascarar a algn
to blow itpifiarla
now you've blown it!¡ahora sí que la has pifiado!
to blow one's lines (US) (Theat) → perder el hilo, olvidar el papel
to blow a secretrevelar un secreto
see also gaff 3
5.
to blow money on sthmalgastar dinero en algo
6. (esp US) (= fellate) → mamársela a, hacer una mamada a
7. (Drugs)
to blow grassfumar hierba
8. (in exclamations) blow me!; blow it!; well I'm blowed!¡caramba!
blow this rain!¡dichosa lluvia!
I'll be blowed ifque me cuelguen si ...
blow the expense!¡al cuerno el gasto!
B. VI
1. [wind, whale] → soplar; [person] (from breathlessness) → jadear
to blow on one's fingerssoplarse los dedos
to blow on one's soupenfriar la sopa soplando
it's blowing a galehace muchísimo viento
see also hot B
see also wind 1 A1
2. [leaves etc] (with wind) → volar
the door blew open/shutse abrió/cerró la puerta con el viento
3. (= make sound) [trumpet, siren] → sonar
the referee blew for a foulel árbitro pitó falta
4. [fuse etc] → fundirse, quemarse; [tyre] → reventar
5. (= leave) → largarse, pirarla (Sp)
I must blowtengo que largarme
C. N
1. [of breath] → soplo m
2. (Brit) (= marijuana) → maría f (US) (= cocaine) → coca f, perico m
D. CPD blow drier Nsecador m de pelo
blow job Nmamada f
to give sb a blow jobmamársela or chupársela a algn
blow about
A. VT + ADV [+ leaves etc] → llevar de acá para allá
B. VI + ADV [leaves etc] → moverse de acá para allá por el viento
blow away
A. VI + ADV [hat] → salir volando, volarse
B. VT + ADV
1. [wind] [+ leaves, rubbish] → hacer volar
2. (= kill) → cargarse a, liquidar
3. (= defeat) → machacar
4. (= impress) → dejar pasmado
blow down
A. VT + ADVderribar
B. VI + ADVvenirse abajo
blow in VI + ADV
1. (= collapse) → venirse abajo
2. (= enter) → entrar de sopetón
look who's blown in!¡mira quién ha caído del cielo!
blow off
A. VI + ADV
1. [hat] → salir volando, volarse
2. (Brit) → tirarse un pedo
B. VT + ADV [+ gas] → dejar escapar
to blow off steamdesfogarse
C. VT + PREP to blow the dust off a tablequitar el polvo de una mesa soplando
blow out
A. VT + ADV
1. (= extinguish) [+ candle] → apagar (con un soplo)
the next day the storm had blown itself outal día siguiente la tormenta se había calmado
2. (= swell out) [+ cheeks] → hinchar
3. to blow one's brains outpegarse un tiro, levantarse or volarse la tapa de los sesos
to blow sb's brains outpegar un tiro a algn, levantar or volar la tapa de los sesos a algn
B. VI + ADV
1. [candle etc] → apagarse
2. [tyre] → reventar; [window] → romperse (con la fuerza del viento etc)
blow over
A. VT + ADVderribar, tumbar
B. VI + ADV
1. [tree etc] → caer
2. [storm] → pasar
3. (fig) [dispute] → olvidarse
blow up
A. VT + ADV
1. (= explode) [+ bridge etc] → volar
2. (= inflate) [+ tyre etc] → inflar, hinchar (Sp)
3. (= enlarge) [+ photo] → ampliar
4. (= exaggerate) [+ event etc] → exagerar
they blew it up out of all proportionse exageró una barbaridad sobre eso, se sacó totalmente de quicio
5. (= reprimand) the boss blew the boy upel jefe puso al chico como un trapo
B. VI + ADV
1. [explosive] → estallar, explotar; [container] → estallar, reventar
his allegations could blow up in his facecon esas acusaciones le podría salir el tiro por la culata
2. [storm] → levantarse
it's blowing up for raincon este viento tendremos lluvia
3. (fig)
3.1. [row etc] → estallar
now something else has blown upahora ha surgido otra cosa
3.2. (in anger) → salirse de sus casillas
to blow up at sbperder los estribos con algn

blow

[ˈbləʊ]
n (physical, emotional)coup m
to come to blows → en venir aux mains
to strike a blow for sth → rompre une lance pour qch
to be a blow to sth → être un coup pour qch
to soften the blow, to cushion the blow → amortir le choc
vb [blew] [ˈbluː] (pt) [blown] [ˈbləʊn] (pp)
vi
[wind, gale] → souffler
[person] → souffler
(= move through the air)
Rain blew into his face → La pluie lui battait le visage.
Sand blew in our eyes → Le vent nous soufflait du sable dans les yeux.
[whistle] → retentir
[fuse] → sauter
a fuse has blown → un fusible a sauté
vt
[+ glass] → souffler
[+ trumpet, horn] → souffler
to blow one's own trumpet, to blow one's own horn → chanter ses propres louanges
to blow a whistle → siffler
to blow one's nose → se moucher
[wind] [+ sand, smoke, rain] → souffler
[+ fuse] → faire sauter
(= destroy) [+ chance] → gâcher
you've blown it! → tu as tout gaché!
to blow sth to bits (with explosives)réduire qch en miettes
[+ money] → claquer
blow away
vis'envoler
vt sep
(lit)chasser, faire s'envoler
to be blown away by sb (= captivated) → tomber sous le charme de qn
blow down
vtfaire tomber, renverser
blow off
vis'envoler
vt sep
[+ hat] → emporter
to blow sth off course [+ ship] → faire dévier qch
to be blown off course [person] → être dévié(e) de sa route
(= not go with) to blow sb off → laisser qn en plan
blow out
vi
[tyre] → éclater
[fuse] → sauter
vt sep
[+ candle, flame] → souffler
[+ window] → briser
blow over
vi [trouble, argument] → passer
The matter quickly blew over
BUT L'affaire fut vite oubliée.
blow up
viexploser, sauter
The house blew up → La maison a sauté.
vt
(= destroy) [+ building, bus, plane] → faire sauter
The terrorists blew up a police station → Les terroristes ont fait sauter un commissariat de police.
(= inflate) [+ balloon, tyre] → gonfler
(= enlarge) [+ image, photo] → agrandirblow-by-blow adj [account, commentary] → minutieux/euse, détaillé(e)blow-dry
n (= hairstyle) → brushing m
A cut and blow-dry, please → Une coupe brushing, s'il vous plaît.
vt
to blow-dry sb's hair → faire un brushing à qn
to blow-dry one's hair → se sécher les cheveuxblow dryer n (= hair dryer) → sèche-cheveuxmblow job npipe f
to give sb a blow job → tailler une pipe à qn

blow

:
blowback
n (Tech, Mil) → Rückstoß m
blow-by-blow
adj accountdetailliert
blow-dry
n to have a cut and blowsich (dat)die Haare schneiden und föhnen lassen
vtföhnen

blow

:
blowfly
blowgun
n (= weapon)Blasrohr nt
blowhole
n
(of whale)Atemloch nt
(Min) → Abzugsloch nt
blow job
n (sl) to give somebody a blowjdm einen blasen (sl)
blowlamp
nLötlampe f

blow

:
blowout
n
(inf: = meal) → Schlemmerei f; to have a blowschlemmen (inf)
(= burst tyre) he had a blowihm ist ein Reifen geplatzt; in the case of a blowwenn ein Reifen platzt
(Elec) there’s been a blowdie Sicherung ist durchgebrannt
(Min) → Ausbruch m; (on oil rig) → Ölausbruch m
(US inf: = clearance sale) → Ausverkauf m
blowpipe
n
(= weapon)Blasrohr nt
(Tech) → Gebläsebrenner m, → Lötrohr nt
(for glassmaking) → Glasbläserpfeife f

blow

:
blowtorch
nLötlampe f
blow-up
n
(inf, = outburst of temper) → Wutausbruch m
(inf, = row) → Krach m; they’ve had a blowsie hatten Krach
(Phot) → Vergrößerung f

blow

1
n (lit, fig)Schlag m; (fig: = sudden misfortune also) → Schicksalsschlag m(for, to für); to come to blowshandgreiflich werden; it came to blowses gab Handgreiflichkeiten; at a (single) or one blow (fig)mit einem Schlag (inf); to give somebody/something a blowjdn/etw schlagen; to deal somebody/something a blow (fig)jdm/einer Sache einen Schlag versetzen; to strike a blow for something (fig)einer Sache (dat)einen großen Dienst erweisen; without striking a blowohne jede Gewalt; to match something blow for blowetw Schlag auf Schlag kontern; they matched us blow for blowsie haben Schlag auf Schlag gekontert

blow

2 vb: pret <blew>, ptp <blown>
vi
(wind)wehen, blasen; there was a draught (Brit) or draft (US) blowing in from the windowes zog vom Fenster her; the wind was blowing hardes wehte ein starker Wind
(person)blasen, pusten (→ on auf +acc); to blow on one’s soupauf die Suppe pusten
(= move with the wind)fliegen; (leaves, hat, papers also)geweht werden; the door blew open/shutdie Tür flog auf/zu
(= make sound, bugle, horn) → blasen; (whistle)pfeifen; then the whistle blew (Sport) → da kam der Pfiff
(fuse, light bulb)durchbrennen; (gasket)platzen
(whale)spritzen; there she blows!Wal in Sicht!
(= pant)pusten (inf), → schnaufen (inf); (animal)schnaufen
(inf, = leave) → abhauen (inf)
vt
(= move by blowing, breeze) → wehen; (strong wind, draught)blasen; (gale etc)treiben; (person)blasen, pusten (inf); the wind blew the ship off courseder Wind trieb das Schiff vom Kurs ab; to blow somebody a kissjdm eine Kusshand zuwerfen
(= drive air into) fireanblasen; eggsausblasen; to blow one’s nosesich (dat)die Nase putzen
(= make by blowing) glass, smoke ringsblasen; bubblesmachen
trumpetblasen; (Hunt, Mil) hornblasen in (+acc); the referee blew his whistleder Schiedsrichter pfiff; to blow one’s own trumpet (Brit) or horn (US) (fig)sein eigenes Lob singen
(= burn out, blow up) safe, bridge etcsprengen; valve, gasketplatzen lassen; transistorzerstören; I’ve blown a fuse/light bulbmir ist eine Sicherung/Birne durchgebrannt; the car blew a tyre (Brit) or tire (US) → an dem Auto ist ein Reifen geplatzt; to be blown to pieces (bridge, car)in die Luft gesprengt werden; (person)zerfetzt werden
(inf: = spend extravagantly) moneyverpulvern (inf)
(inf: = reveal) secretverraten ? gaff2
(Brit inf: = damn) blow!Mist! (inf); blow this rain!dieser mistige Regen! (inf); blow the expense/what he likes!das ist doch wurscht, was es kostet/was er will (inf); well, I’ll be blowedMensch(enskind)! (inf); I’ll be blowed if I’ll do itich denke nicht im Traum dran(, das zu tun) (inf); … and blow me if he still didn’t forget… und er hat es trotzdem glatt vergessen (inf)
(inf) to blow one’s chances of doing somethinges sich (dat)verscherzen, etw zu tun; I think I’ve blown itich glaube, ich habs versaut (inf)
(inf) ? mind 1
(esp US sl: = fellate) to blow somebodyjdm einen blasen (sl)
n
(= expulsion of breath)Blasen nt, → Pusten nt (inf); to give a blowblasen, pusten (inf); (when blowing nose) → sich schnäuzen
(Brit: = breath of air) to go for a blowsich durchlüften lassen

blow

1 [bləʊ] n (gen) → colpo; (with fist) → pugno
a blow with a hammer → un colpo di martello
at one blow → in un colpo (solo)
to come to blows → venire alle mani
the news came as a great blow to her → la notizia fu un duro colpo per lei

blow

2 [bləʊ] (blew (vb: pt) (blown (pp)))
1. vt
a. (subj, wind, ship) → spingere; (hair) → far svolazzare
a gale blew the ship off course → una bufera ha fatto uscire di rotta la nave
b. (trumpet, horn) → suonare
to blow a whistle → fischiare
to blow one's own trumpet → cantare le proprie lodi
c. (bubbles) → fare; (glass) → soffiare; (kiss) → mandare
to blow one's nose → soffiarsi il naso
d. (fuse, safe) → far saltare
to blow money on sth (fam) → buttare via dei soldi per qc
to blow a secret → spifferare un segreto
to blow sb's cover → scoprire il gioco di qn
to blow one's top (fam) → esplodere, andare su tutte le furie
blow the expense! → crepi l'avarizia!
well, blow me!, well, I'll be blowed! (old) (expressing surprise) → accidenti!
I'll be blowed if ... (expressing indignation) → che mi venga un accidente se...
2. vi
a. (wind, person) → soffiare; (leaves) → svolazzare; (flag) → sventolare
to blow on one's fingers → scaldarsi le mani soffiando
to blow on one's soup → soffiare sulla minestra
to see which way the wind blows (fig) → vedere che aria tira
his hat blew out of the window → il suo cappello è volato fuori dalla finestra
the door blew open/shut → un colpo di vento ha spalancato/chiuso la porta
b. (make sound, trumpet) → suonare
the referee blew his whistle → l'arbitro fischiò
c. (fuse) → saltare; (tyre) → scoppiare
blow away
1. vi + advvolare via
2. vt + adv (papers, leaves) → far volare via; (hat) → portare via
blow down
1. vi + advessere abbattuto/a dal vento
2. vt + advabbattere
blow in vi + adv (window) → sfasciarsi; (enter, leaves, dust) → volar dentro
look who's just blown in! (fam) → ma guarda chi è arrivato!
blow off
1. vi + adv (hat) → volar via
2. vt + adv (hat) → portare via
to blow off steam (fig) (fam) → sfogarsi
blow out
1. vt + adv (candle) → spegnere; (swell out, cheeks) → gonfiare
2. vi + advscoppiare
blow over
1. vt + adv (tree) → abbattere
2. vi + adv (tree) → rovesciarsi; (storm) → passare, calmarsi (fig) (dispute) → calmarsi
blow up
1. vt + adv (bridge) → far saltare; (tyre, balloon) → gonfiare; (photo) → ingrandire; (event) → esagerare
2. vi + adv (bomb) (fig) (person) → esplodere; (row) → scoppiare; (storm, gather) → arrivare

blow1

(bləu) noun
1. a stroke or knock. a blow on the head.
2. a sudden misfortune. Her husband's death was a real blow.

blow2

(bləu) past tense blew (blu) : past participle blown verb
1. (of a current of air) to be moving. The wind blew more strongly.
2. (of eg wind) to cause (something) to move in a given way. The explosion blew off the lid.
3. to be moved by the wind etc. The door must have blown shut.
4. to drive air (upon or into). Please blow into this tube!
5. to make a sound by means of (a musical instrument etc). He blew the horn loudly.
ˈblowhole noun
a breathing-hole (through the ice for seals etc) or a nostril (especially on the head of a whale etc).
ˈblow-lamp, ˈblow-torch noun
a lamp for aiming a very hot flame at a particular spot. The painter burned off the old paint with a blow-lamp.
ˈblowout noun
1. the bursting of a car tyre. That's the second blowout I've had with this car.
2. (on eg an oil rig) a violent escape of gas etc.
ˈblowpipe noun
a tube from which a dart (often poisonous) is blown.
blow one's top
to become very angry. She blew her top when he arrived home late.
blow out
to extinguish or put out (a flame etc) by blowing. The wind blew out the candle; The child blew out the match.
blow over
to pass and become forgotten. The trouble will soon blow over.
blow up
1. to break into pieces, or be broken into pieces, by an explosion. The bridge blew up / was blown up.
2. to fill with air or a gas. He blew up the balloon.
3. to lose one's temper. If he says that again I'll blow up.

blow

لَطْمَة, يَنْفُخُ, يَهُبُ foukat, úder blæse, puste, slag blasen, Schlag κτύπημα, φυσάω, φυσώ golpe, soplar isku, puhaltaa coup, souffler puhati, udarac colpo, soffiare ・・・に息を吐く, 吹く, 強打 강타, 불다 blazen, klap blåse, slag dmuchać, dmuchnąć, dmuchnięcie pancada, soprar, sopro дуть, удар blåsa, slag เป่า, ถูกต่อย, พัด darbe, esmek, üflemek đòn đánh, thổi , 拳打, 风吹

blow

n. golpe;
vt. soplar,
to ___ one's nosesoplarse, sonarse la nariz;
to give a ___golpear.

blow

n golpe m; psychological — golpe psicológico; vt, vi (pret blew; pp blown) soplar; Blow as hard as you can..Sople lo más fuerte que pueda; to — one’s nose sonarse la nariz, soplarse la nariz (Carib)
References in classic literature ?
To others it might seem a ludicrous or trivial affair, but to her it was a hard experience, for during the twelve years of her life she had been governed by love alone, and a blow of that sort had never touched her before.
I will take any blow that may befall if but this my boy be allowed to express some- thing for us both.
Sharp commands from the ship's officers hastened the work of the crew in making things snug, and life lines were strung along deck for the safety of such of the passengers as might venture up when the blow began.
There in the sheltered draw-bottom the wind did not blow very hard, but I could hear it singing its humming tune up on the level, and I could see the tall grasses wave.
You know that I come of tough fiber--of that old Creole race of Pontelliers that dry up and finally blow away.
When, therefore, intelligence was received at the fort which covered the southern termination of the portage between the Hudson and the lakes, that Montcalm had been seen moving up the Champlain, with an army "numerous as the leaves on the trees," its truth was admitted with more of the craven reluctance of fear than with the stern joy that a warrior should feel, in finding an enemy within reach of his blow.
But this consideration did not seem to affect him; the last blow was struck, and as the freed timbers rolled on, over and over, he boldly plunged into the flood.
Now let Hepzibah turn the old Pyncheon portraits with their faces to the wall, and take the map of her Eastern territory to kindle the kitchen fire, and blow up the flame with the empty breath of her ancestral traditions
Dames of elevated rank, likewise, whose doors she entered in the way of her occupation, were accustomed to distil drops of bitterness into her heart; sometimes through that alchemy of quiet malice, by which women can concoct a subtle poison from ordinary trifles; and sometimes, also, by a coarser expression, that fell upon the sufferer's defenceless breast like a rough blow upon an ulcerated wound.
Grose took it as she might have taken a blow in the stomach.
With all her might she crowds all sail off shore; in so doing, fights 'gainst the very winds that fain would blow her homeward; seeks all the lashed sea's landlessness again; for refuge's sake forlornly rushing into peril; her only friend her bitterest foe
Looky here -- do you think YOU'D venture to blow on us?