blowhole

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blow·hole

 (blō′hōl′)
n.
1. An opening or one of a pair of openings for breathing, located on the top of the head of cetaceans, such as whales and dolphins. The blowhole is opened by muscles upon surfacing and closed by the pressure of water upon diving.
2. A hole in ice to which aquatic mammals, such as dolphins, come to breathe.
3. A vent to permit the escape of air or other gas.

blowhole

(ˈbləʊˌhəʊl)
n
1. (Zoology) the nostril, paired or single, of whales, situated far back on the skull
2. (Zoology) a hole in ice through which whales, seals, etc, breathe
3. (Building)
a. a vent for air or gas, esp to release fumes from a tunnel, passage, etc
b. NZ a hole emitting gas or steam in a volcanic region
4. (Metallurgy) a bubble-like defect in an ingot resulting from gas being trapped during solidification
5. (Geological Science) geology a hole in a cliff top leading to a sea cave through which air is forced by the action of the sea

blow•hole

(ˈbloʊˌhoʊl)

n.
1. either of two nostrils or spiracles, or a single one, at the top of the head in whales and dolphins, through which they breathe.
2. a hole in the ice to which whales or seals come to breathe.
3. a defect in metal caused by the escape of gas.
[1685–95]

blow·hole

(blō′hōl′)
1. A hole or one of a pair of holes used for breathing and located on top of the head of whales, porpoises, and dolphins.
2. A hole in ice to which aquatic mammals come to breathe.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blowhole - the spiracle of a cetacean located far back on the skullblowhole - the spiracle of a cetacean located far back on the skull
cetacean, cetacean mammal, blower - large aquatic carnivorous mammal with fin-like forelimbs no hind limbs, including: whales; dolphins; porpoises; narwhals
spiracle - a breathing orifice
2.blowhole - a hole for the escape of gas or airblowhole - a hole for the escape of gas or air
air duct, air passage, airway - a duct that provides ventilation (as in mines)
hole - an opening deliberately made in or through something
smoke hole - a vent (as in a roof) for smoke to escape
Translations
مَنْفَذُ هَواء
nozdryvětrací/dýchací otvor
åndehul
szelelõlyuk
öndunarop; blástursop
hava deliğinefeslik

blowhole

[ˈbləʊhəʊl] N
1. [of whale] → orificio m nasal
2. (in ice) → brecha f, orificio m (para respirar)

blowhole

[ˈbləʊˌhəʊl] n (Geol) → sfiatatoio

blow2

(bləu) past tense blew (blu) : past participle blown verb
1. (of a current of air) to be moving. The wind blew more strongly.
2. (of eg wind) to cause (something) to move in a given way. The explosion blew off the lid.
3. to be moved by the wind etc. The door must have blown shut.
4. to drive air (upon or into). Please blow into this tube!
5. to make a sound by means of (a musical instrument etc). He blew the horn loudly.
ˈblowhole noun
a breathing-hole (through the ice for seals etc) or a nostril (especially on the head of a whale etc).
ˈblow-lamp, ˈblow-torch noun
a lamp for aiming a very hot flame at a particular spot. The painter burned off the old paint with a blow-lamp.
ˈblowout noun
1. the bursting of a car tyre. That's the second blowout I've had with this car.
2. (on eg an oil rig) a violent escape of gas etc.
ˈblowpipe noun
a tube from which a dart (often poisonous) is blown.
blow one's top
to become very angry. She blew her top when he arrived home late.
blow out
to extinguish or put out (a flame etc) by blowing. The wind blew out the candle; The child blew out the match.
blow over
to pass and become forgotten. The trouble will soon blow over.
blow up
1. to break into pieces, or be broken into pieces, by an explosion. The bridge blew up / was blown up.
2. to fill with air or a gas. He blew up the balloon.
3. to lose one's temper. If he says that again I'll blow up.
References in periodicals archive ?
The gas evolved from naturally or fully bonded green sand during casting may be unable to pass through the sand quickly enough to prevent blowholes.
Chemical analyses are important tools in drawing conclusions about defects such as shrinkage cavities, nitrogen fissures, hydrogen pinholes and carbon monoxide blowholes.
Our trip to the ocean blowholes in Mugsayl, with our wonderful guides Mahat and Mohammed, and the remains of the Queen of Sheba's Palace was excellent and easy from the Rotana.
During the monsoon, as sea levels rise and water currents become more active, the water surges through the blowholes like huge fountains, creating an attractive sight.
Casting shall be free from casting defects, blowholes, surface pitting etc.
Also known as the 'Perfume Capital,' it is popular for its beaches, waterfalls, limestone cliffs, blowholes, coconut and banana plantations, and heritage attractions.
Staging the first urban stop in a series that has seen divers plunge into mystic blowholes, sail above blue lagoons, glory dive among beautiful Mediterranean Isles and tackle volcanic shores, the Boston stop set the tone for urban viewing and the massive audience that a sport like cliff diving can reach.
KhawrMughsyl, a nature reserve located near the blowholes also draws tourists.
The fatal accident took place in the afternoon when two vehicles, coming from different directions, crashed into a truck on the main road near Al Mughsayl Blowholes in eastern Salalah, according to sources in the Royal Oman Police.
The difference between this and other blowholes is its near-perfect rectangle.
Visitors to Hackley Bay on the Forvie nature reserve watched three whales for hours last week, as they surfaced and spouted through their blowholes.