blowhole

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blow·hole

 (blō′hōl′)
n.
1. An opening or one of a pair of openings for breathing, located on the top of the head of cetaceans, such as whales and dolphins. The blowhole is opened by muscles upon surfacing and closed by the pressure of water upon diving.
2. A hole in ice to which aquatic mammals, such as dolphins, come to breathe.
3. A vent to permit the escape of air or other gas.

blowhole

(ˈbləʊˌhəʊl)
n
1. (Zoology) the nostril, paired or single, of whales, situated far back on the skull
2. (Zoology) a hole in ice through which whales, seals, etc, breathe
3. (Building)
a. a vent for air or gas, esp to release fumes from a tunnel, passage, etc
b. NZ a hole emitting gas or steam in a volcanic region
4. (Metallurgy) a bubble-like defect in an ingot resulting from gas being trapped during solidification
5. (Geological Science) geology a hole in a cliff top leading to a sea cave through which air is forced by the action of the sea

blow•hole

(ˈbloʊˌhoʊl)

n.
1. either of two nostrils or spiracles, or a single one, at the top of the head in whales and dolphins, through which they breathe.
2. a hole in the ice to which whales or seals come to breathe.
3. a defect in metal caused by the escape of gas.
[1685–95]

blow·hole

(blō′hōl′)
1. A hole or one of a pair of holes used for breathing and located on top of the head of whales, porpoises, and dolphins.
2. A hole in ice to which aquatic mammals come to breathe.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blowhole - the spiracle of a cetacean located far back on the skullblowhole - the spiracle of a cetacean located far back on the skull
cetacean, cetacean mammal, blower - large aquatic carnivorous mammal with fin-like forelimbs no hind limbs, including: whales; dolphins; porpoises; narwhals
spiracle - a breathing orifice
2.blowhole - a hole for the escape of gas or airblowhole - a hole for the escape of gas or air
air duct, air passage, airway - a duct that provides ventilation (as in mines)
hole - an opening deliberately made in or through something
smoke hole - a vent (as in a roof) for smoke to escape
Translations
مَنْفَذُ هَواء
nozdryvětrací/dýchací otvor
åndehul
szelelõlyuk
öndunarop; blástursop
hava deliğinefeslik

blowhole

[ˈbləʊhəʊl] N
1. [of whale] → orificio m nasal
2. (in ice) → brecha f, orificio m (para respirar)

blowhole

[ˈbləʊˌhəʊl] n (Geol) → sfiatatoio

blow2

(bləu) past tense blew (blu) : past participle blown verb
1. (of a current of air) to be moving. The wind blew more strongly.
2. (of eg wind) to cause (something) to move in a given way. The explosion blew off the lid.
3. to be moved by the wind etc. The door must have blown shut.
4. to drive air (upon or into). Please blow into this tube!
5. to make a sound by means of (a musical instrument etc). He blew the horn loudly.
ˈblowhole noun
a breathing-hole (through the ice for seals etc) or a nostril (especially on the head of a whale etc).
ˈblow-lamp, ˈblow-torch noun
a lamp for aiming a very hot flame at a particular spot. The painter burned off the old paint with a blow-lamp.
ˈblowout noun
1. the bursting of a car tyre. That's the second blowout I've had with this car.
2. (on eg an oil rig) a violent escape of gas etc.
ˈblowpipe noun
a tube from which a dart (often poisonous) is blown.
blow one's top
to become very angry. She blew her top when he arrived home late.
blow out
to extinguish or put out (a flame etc) by blowing. The wind blew out the candle; The child blew out the match.
blow over
to pass and become forgotten. The trouble will soon blow over.
blow up
1. to break into pieces, or be broken into pieces, by an explosion. The bridge blew up / was blown up.
2. to fill with air or a gas. He blew up the balloon.
3. to lose one's temper. If he says that again I'll blow up.
References in periodicals archive ?
There is the challenge of walking many miles each day, but there is also time to gaze out upon long stretches of sandy beaches, witness the ocean's moods as it blasts seawater up through blowholes, and look out from mountain paths across valleys blanketed with fog.
Apprill and her colleagues wanted a new way to collect samples of whales' blow--the moist breath that whales spray out of their blowholes.
by Times News Service Guests at the Al Baleed Resort can get off the beaten track by 4x4 expeditions to discover hissing blowholes, dramatic sinkholes, and ancient villages.
Commenting on the new product, Flexcrete director Chris Lloyd says: "Several of our customers were seeking an economical product that is able to bridge cracks and fill pores, cavities and blowholes prior to the application of our Monodex coatings.
Clouds of warm air, just spouted from their blowholes, hang overhead.
Shouldconfirm chemical composition,hardness, microstructure, sphericalshape, lower breakage produces lowdust, longer recycle life, shouldbe free from slag and foreignmaterial, tails and blowholes.
The high-resolution image quality allows users to accurately detect defects and discriminate between blowholes and material.
Blowholes are formed through small openings in the ground through which air will blow out or suck in.
During the monsoon, as sea levels rise and water currents become more active, the water surges through the blowholes like huge fountains, creating an attractive sight.
KhawrMughsyl, a nature reserve located near the blowholes also draws tourists.
The fatal accident took place in the afternoon when two vehicles, coming from different directions, crashed into a truck on the main road near Al Mughsayl Blowholes in eastern Salalah, according to sources in the Royal Oman Police.
The difference between this and other blowholes is its near-perfect rectangle.