motmot

(redirected from blue-crowned motmots)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

mot·mot

 (mŏt′mŏt′)
n.
Any of various tropical American birds of the family Momotidae, usually having green and blue plumage with long tail feathers that have paddle- or racket-shaped tips.

[New Latin motmot, probably of imitative origin.]

motmot

(ˈmɒtmɒt)
n
(Animals) any tropical American bird of the family Momotidae, having a long tail and blue and brownish-green plumage: order Coraciiformes (kingfishers, etc)
[C19: from American Spanish, imitative of the bird's call]

mot•mot

(ˈmɒtˌmɒt)

n.
any of various tropical American birds of the family Momotidae, akin to the kingfishers.
[1830–40; < New Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.motmot - tropical American bird resembling a blue jay and having greenish and bluish plumagemotmot - tropical American bird resembling a blue jay and having greenish and bluish plumage
coraciiform bird - chiefly short-legged arboreal nonpasserine birds that nest in holes
family Momotidae, Momotidae - a family of birds of the order Coraciiformes
References in periodicals archive ?
Respiratory trematodiasis is reported rarely in birds, although blue-crowned motmots (Momotus momota) appear overrepresented in published (1,2) and anecdotal reports (J.
Because of the high representation of blue-crowned motmots with air sac trematodiasis in reported cases, 2 blue-crowned motmots were sedated by isoflurane administered by facemask and endotracheal intubation for exploratory laparoscopy to identify adult trematodes, in addition to the previously described diagnostic methods.
Several avian species involved in this case management were managed cooperatively via Species Survival Plans of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums and were recommended to produce offspring for transfer to other institutions, including the Bali mynahs, blue-crowned motmots, black-necked stilts, blue-crowned laughing thrush, blue-grey tanagers, lesser green broadbills, white-headed buffalo weavers, Cape thick-knee, fairy bluebirds, golden-breasted starlings, laughing kookaburra, Micronesian kingfishers, red-billed leothrix, green-naped pheasant pigeons, and sunbittern.
JUST IMAGINE IF, INSTEAD OF WORKING IN AN OFFICE WITH other people, you reported to work every day with beluga whales, bonnet-head sharks, blue-crowned motmots, and poison-dart frogs.