bluefin

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bluefin

(ˈbluːˌfɪn) or

bluefin tuna

n
(Animals) another name for tunny
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bluefin - flesh of very large tuna
horse mackerel, Thunnus thynnus, bluefin, bluefin tuna - largest tuna; to 1500 pounds; of mostly temperate seas: feed in polar regions but breed in tropics
tuna fish, tunny, tuna - important warm-water fatty fish of the genus Thunnus of the family Scombridae; usually served as steaks
2.bluefin - largest tunabluefin - largest tuna; to 1500 pounds; of mostly temperate seas: feed in polar regions but breed in tropics
genus Thunnus, Thunnus - tunas: warm-blooded fishes
tunny, tuna - any very large marine food and game fish of the genus Thunnus; related to mackerel; chiefly of warm waters
bluefin, bluefin tuna - flesh of very large tuna
References in periodicals archive ?
The consolidation with Bluefins Decryptx Decryption as a Service (DaaS) product will allow TNS to provide the security of Bluefins PCI-validated P2PE solution within its range of Managed POS Encryption products.
Industry-leading payments solutions provider, Transaction Network Services (TNS), has entered a partnership with Bluefin Payment Systems to offer Bluefin's Decryptx PCI-validated Point-to-Point Encryption (P2PE) solution within its Managed POS Encryption suite.
This gear occasionally hooks large bluefins, many of which die before they may be released (struggling in warm surface water is one explanation for this mortality).
The seemingly insatiable demand for Atlantic bluefins has led to a serious depletion of stocks by fishing ships using the latest technology, including advanced sonar and spotter planes, to follow shoals and catch as many tuna as they can, said Marta Crespo, spokeswoman for a local association of almadraba fishermen.
Japan is the world's biggest consumer of seafood, with Japanese eating 80 percent of the Atlantic and Pacific bluefins caught.
Freshly caught bluefins routinely jet worldwide before ending up in tiny pieces between a pair of chopsticks.
If a ban is approved, countries still would be allowed to catch bluefins for domestic consumption.
Now new research on the whereabouts of Atlantic bluefins could provide the hard numbers needed for developing effective strategies to save the fisheries from collapse.
These bluefin tuna are divided into two groups: western Atlantic bluefins and eastern Atlantic bluefins.
According to Safina, Japan is the largest consumer of bluefins.
Roecker, who caught two bluefins on Tuesday, said the blues are in the 20- to 40-pound range, the albies, or longfins, are 15-20 pounds and the yellowtails are 2-20 pounds with the majority, known as firecrackers, weighing in at 10 pounds or less.
The greater mobility of bluefins is just one insight to come from a new generation of fish-tagging experiments, explains Barbara A.