bluehead


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bluehead

(ˈbluːˌhɛd)
n
either of two fish of the wrasse family, Thalassoma amblycephalum or Thalassoma bifasciatum
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bluehead - small Atlantic wrasse the male of which has a brilliant blue head
wrasse - chiefly tropical marine fishes with fleshy lips and powerful teeth; usually brightly colored
genus Thalassoma, Thalassoma - a genus of Labridae
References in periodicals archive ?
Status and structure of two populations of the bluehead sucker (Catostomus discobolus) in the Weber River, Utah.
INVESTIGATION OF STREAM DISTURBANCE ON REPRODUCTIVE LIFE HISTORY TRAITS IN BLUEHEAD CHUBS, Kaleigh Sims *.
For example, the flannelmouth sucker (Catostomus latipinnis), bluehead sucker (Catostomus discobolus), and white sucker (Catostomus commersonii) comprised 65-75% of the total catch in the upper Colorado River (Carter and others 1986).
Sexual selection and male characteristics in the bluehead wrasse, Thalassoma bifasciatum; mating site acquisition, mating site defense, and female choice.
Introduced into the frigid, bottle-green waters below Glen Canyon Dam for the pleasure of sport fishermen, trout have become a threat to fish native to the Colorado River--humpback chubs, flannelmouth suckers, and bluehead suckers; they compete for food and prey on the young of these now rare or endangered species.
In contrast, the bluehead wrasse (Thalassoma bifasciatum) lacks structure even at the scale of the entire Caribbean basin.
Other findings include new records and range extension for rarely collected species such as the mooneye (Hiodon tergisus), bluehead shiner (Pteronotropis hubbsi), mud darter (Etheostoma asprigene), swamp darter (Etheostoma fusiforme), and the undescribed Ouachita darter (Percina sp.
One of the rare fishes here is the Zuni bluehead sucker (Catostomus discobolus yarrowi).
Yet others, such as the common bluehead wrasse, reverse sex and have two very different types of males.
Bluehead chub nesting activity: a potential mechanism of population persistence in degraded stream habitats.
A subspecies of Bluehead Chub (Nocomis leptocephalus interocularis, Cyprinidae) was previously misidentified as River Chub (N.