blues

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Related to bluesier: bluesy

blues

 (blo͞oz)
pl.n. (used with a sing. or pl. verb)
1. A state of depression or melancholy. Often used with the.
2. A style of music that evolved from southern African-American secular songs and is usually distinguished by a strong 4/4 rhythm, flatted thirds and sevenths, a 12-bar structure, and lyrics in a three-line stanza in which the second line repeats the first: "The blues is an expression of anger against shame and humiliation" (B.B. King).

[Short for blue devils, a feeling of depression.]

blues′man n.
blues′y adj.

blues

(bluːz)
pl n (sometimes functioning as singular)
1. a feeling of depression or deep unhappiness
2. (Jazz) a type of folk song devised by Black Americans at the beginning of the 20th century, usually employing a basic 12-bar chorus, the tonic, subdominant, and dominant chords, frequent minor intervals, and blue notes
ˈbluesy adj

Blues

(bluːz)
pl n
the Blues Brit the Royal Horse Guards

blues

(bluz)

n.
1. the blues, (used with a pl. v.) depressed spirits; melancholy.
2. (used with a sing. v.)
a. a song of woe and yearning marked by persistent blue notes and structured in a 12-bar chorus with three-line stanzas of which the third line typically repeats the first.
b. the genre of jazz and popular music comprising such songs.
3. any of various blue military uniforms worn by members of the U.S. armed services.
4. a blue work uniform.
[1800–10]
blues′y, adj.

blues

The blues is a distinctive, indigenous black-American song form, important not only in its own right, but also because it was a major element in the evolution of jazz and, later, rock’n’roll.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blues - a type of folksong that originated among Black Americans at the beginning of the 20th centuryblues - a type of folksong that originated among Black Americans at the beginning of the 20th century; has a melancholy sound from repeated use of blue notes
African-American music, black music - music created by African-American musicians; early forms were songs that had a melodic line and a strong rhythmic beat with repeated choruses
folk ballad, folk song, folksong - a song that is traditionally sung by the common people of a region and forms part of their culture
blue note - a flattened third or seventh
boogie, boogie-woogie - an instrumental version of the blues (especially for piano)
2.blues - a state of depressionblues - a state of depression; "he had a bad case of the blues"
depression - a mental state characterized by a pessimistic sense of inadequacy and a despondent lack of activity

blues

noun
Translations
blues
blues
BluesBlaumiese
blues-musiikki
bluesbluz
ブルース
블루스
blues
เพลงช้าที่มีจังหวะหนัก
nhạc blues

blues

[ˈbluːz] npl
the blues (MUSIC)le blues
the blues (= depression) → le cafard
to have the blues (= depression) → avoir le cafard mid-term bluesblues band ngroupe m de bluesblues guitar nguitare f blues

blues

[bluːz] npl (Mus) the bluesil blues
to have the blues (fam) (depression) → essere giù

blues

بلوز blues blues Blues μπλουζ blues blues-musiikki blues blues blues ブルース 블루스 blues blues blues blues, melancolia блюз blues เพลงช้าที่มีจังหวะหนัก melankoli nhạc blues 蓝调音乐

blues

n. término usada por depresión.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thomas Wynn & The Believers - Wade Waist Deep dip into Southern rock's darker, bluesier realm, from the Orlando outlaws who deserve much more recognition.
Accompanied by Jay Lewis on slide guitar, these songs develop a far rootsier and bluesier sound than Cast ever hinted at with the Bible-referencing Old Red Sea and the charming Small Farm the pick of the bunch.
Both versions are great, but Hopewell's raw, bluesier voice brings a completely different vibe to the song.
M Shadows said: "Purely on a musical level we wanted to make something that was stripped down and bad-ass with a lot of bluesier riffs.
His questioning whether to go for a more melodic or bluesier vocalization while listening to Leadbelly equates to his deciding on different attitudes toward life.
A bluesier number, "Early in the Morning," also prompted the crowd to dance and sing along with no coaxing from the band.
I'd call The Black Keys a bluesier band than The White Stripes were.