boatman


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Related to boatman: water boatman

boat·man

 (bōt′mən)
n.
One who works on, deals with, or operates boats.

boat′man·ship′ n.

boatman

(ˈbəʊtmən)
n, pl -men
1. a man who works on, hires out, repairs, or operates a boat or boats
2. (Animals) short for water boatman

boat•man

(ˈboʊt mən)

n., pl. -men.
1. a person skilled in the use of boats.
2. a person who sells, rents, or works on boats.
[1505–15]
boat′man•ship`, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.boatman - someone who drives or rides in a boatboatman - someone who drives or rides in a boat
worker - a person who works at a specific occupation; "he is a good worker"
canoeist, paddler - someone paddling a canoe
ferryman - a man who operates a ferry
gondolier, gondoliere - a (Venetian) boatman who propels a gondola
oarsman, rower - someone who rows a boat
punter - someone who propels a boat with a pole
Translations
بَحّار، نوتي، مَراكِبي
převozník
færgemand
csónakos
ferjumaîur, bátmaîur
prievozník
kayıkçısandalcı

boatman

[ˈbəʊtmən] N (boatmen (pl)) → barquero m

boat

(bəut) noun
1. a small vessel for travelling over water. We'll cross the stream by boat.
2. a larger vessel for the same purpose; a ship. to cross the Atlantic in a passenger boat.
3. a serving-dish shaped like a boat. a gravy-boat.
verb
to sail about in a small boat for pleasure. They are boating on the river.
ˈboatman noun
a man in charge of a small boat in which fare-paying passengers are carried.
in the same boat
in the same, usually difficult, position or circumstances. We're all in the same boat as far as low wages are concerned.
ˈspeedboat noun
a fast motor boat.
References in classic literature ?
It's the right sort of a house for such a thorough-built boatman.
By the courtesy of the chief boatman, I was, as your correspondent, permitted to climb on deck, and was one of a small group who saw the dead seaman whilst actually lashed to the wheel.
He ran along the high road, took the path he had before taken, and reaching the ferry, interrogated the boatman.
A boatman, who had passed by Rogliano, and who had several of these animals, whose tricks had greatly diverted him, had, doubtless, suggested this idea to him.
Presently Dominic, hailing an idle boatman, directed him to go and fish his nephew out; and by-and-by Cesar appeared walking on board from the quay, shivering, streaming with filthy water, with bits of rotten straws in his hair and a piece of dirty orange-peel stranded on his shoulder.
The light suddenly changed its direction, and a long and slightly built boat hove up out of the gloom, while the red glare fell on the weather-beaten features of the Leather-Stocking, whose tall person was seen erect in the frail vessel, wielding, with the grace of an experienced boatman, a long fishing-spear, which he held by its centre, first dropping one end and then the other into the water, to aid in propelling the little canoe of bark, we will not say through, but over, the water.
A boatman turned where he sat on the gunwale, lifted up his hand, said something that was not a blessing, and the boats creaked on through the twilight.
On returning to the sacristy he had torn off his alb, cope, and stole, had flung all into the hands of the stupefied beadle, had made his escape through the private door of the cloister, had ordered a boatman of the Terrain to transport him to the left bank of the Seine, and had plunged into the hilly streets of the University, not knowing whither he was going, encountering at every step groups of men and women who were hurrying joyously towards the Pont Saint-Michel, in the hope of still arriving in time to see the witch hung there,--pale, wild, more troubled, more blind and more fierce than a night bird let loose and pursued by a troop of children in broad daylight.
When we got down to the landing-stage, the boatman said:
He stopped, moreover, and began inquiring of an old boatman as to the tides and the ships.
His garmenture was that of the ordinary Malay boatman, but there was that in his mien and his attitude toward his companions which belied his lowly habiliments.
Men with the blue jersey and peaked cap of the boatman, or the white ducks of the dockers, began to replace the cardurys and fustian of the laborers.