boatswain

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Related to boatswains: boatswains chair, Boatswain's Mate

boat·swain

also bo's'n or bos'n or bo·sun  (bō′sən)
n.
A warrant officer or petty officer in charge of a ship's rigging, anchors, cables, and deck crew.

[Middle English botswein : bot, boat; see boat + swein, mate; see swain.]
Usage Note: The word boatswain is pronounced as a single word with two syllables (bō′sən). People with sea legs have a long tradition of spelling the word as bosun, bo's'n, and bos'n to reflect the salty pronunciation. This of course has not prevented landlubbers from using the incorrect two-word pronunciation (bōt′swān′). Many other nautical words have similarly tricky shipboard pronunciations, including bowline, pronounced (bō′lĭn); forecastle, pronounced (fōk′səl) and sometimes spelled fo'c's'le; gunwale, pronounced (gŭn′əl) and also sometimes spelled gunnel; mainsail, pronounced (mān′səl); and topgallant, pronounced (tə-găl′ənt). With the exception of gunwale, however, all of these terms can be correctly pronounced as if they were two words.

boatswain

(ˈbəʊsən) ,

bosun

or

bo's'n

n
(Nautical Terms) a petty officer on a merchant ship or a warrant officer on a warship who is responsible for the maintenance of the ship and its equipment
[Old English bātswegen; see boat, swain]

boat•swain

or bo's'n

(ˈboʊ sən)

n.
a warrant officer on a warship, or a petty officer on a merchant vessel, in charge of rigging, anchors, cables, etc.
[1400–50; late Middle English boteswayn; see boat, swain]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.boatswain - a petty officer on a merchant ship who controls the work of other seamenboatswain - a petty officer on a merchant ship who controls the work of other seamen
Jack-tar, mariner, old salt, sea dog, seafarer, seaman, gob, Jack, tar - a man who serves as a sailor
Translations
loďmistr
bådsmand
fedélzetmester
bátsmaîur
bocmanas
bocmanis
loďmajster
lostromoporsum

boatswain

[ˈbəʊsn] Ncontramaestre m

boatswain

[ˈbəʊsən] nmaître m d'équipageboat train ntrain m (assurant la correspondance avec un service de ferry)boat trip n (= excursion) → excursion f en bateau

boatswain

, bosun, bo’s’n
nBootsmann m; boatswain’s mateBootsmanngehilfe m

boatswain

[ˈbəʊsn] nnostromo

boatswain,

bosun

(ˈbəusn) noun
an officer who looks after a ship's boats, ropes, sails etc.
References in classic literature ?
There, I found a virtuous boatswain in his Majesty's service - a most excellent man, though I could have wished his trousers not quite so tight in some places and not quite so loose in others - who knocked all the little men's hats over their eyes, though he was very generous and brave, and who wouldn't hear of anybody's paying taxes, though he was very patriotic.
We landed without any noise, and divided our men into two bodies, whereof the boatswain commanded one and I the other.
The boatswain had arrived on the bridge, crawling on all fours against the wind, and had found the chief mate's legs with the top of his head.
I have a boatswain who pipes, Livesey; so things shall go man-o'-war fashion on board the good ship HISPANIOLA.
There, too, on the approach to the land, assisted by the boatswain and the carpenter, he "gets the anchors over" with the men of his own watch, whom he knows better than the others.
He was a native of Liverpool, in England, and had followed the sea from boyhood, until, by dint of good conduct, he had risen so far in his profession as to be boatswain of an American ship called the Eleanor, commanded by Captain Metcalf.
Towards evening the mate and boatswain begged the master of our ship to let them cut away the fore-mast, which he was very unwilling to do; but the boatswain protesting to him that if he did not the ship would founder, he consented; and when they had cut away the fore-mast, the main-mast stood so loose, and shook the ship so much, they were obliged to cut that away also, and make a clear deck.
This was, it seems, the boatswain, a very civil, courteous sort of man, who told me I should have that, or any other liberty that I desired, that he could allow me with safety.