boatswain

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Related to boatswains: boatswains chair, Boatswain's Mate

boat·swain

also bo's'n or bos'n or bo·sun  (bō′sən)
n.
A warrant officer or petty officer in charge of a ship's rigging, anchors, cables, and deck crew.

[Middle English botswein : bot, boat; see boat + swein, mate; see swain.]
Usage Note: The word boatswain is pronounced as a single word with two syllables (bō′sən). People with sea legs have a long tradition of spelling the word as bosun, bo's'n, and bos'n to reflect the salty pronunciation. This of course has not prevented landlubbers from using the incorrect two-word pronunciation (bōt′swān′). Many other nautical words have similarly tricky shipboard pronunciations, including bowline, pronounced (bō′lĭn); forecastle, pronounced (fōk′səl) and sometimes spelled fo'c's'le; gunwale, pronounced (gŭn′əl) and also sometimes spelled gunnel; mainsail, pronounced (mān′səl); and topgallant, pronounced (tə-găl′ənt). With the exception of gunwale, however, all of these terms can be correctly pronounced as if they were two words.

boatswain

(ˈbəʊsən) ,

bosun

or

bo's'n

n
(Nautical Terms) a petty officer on a merchant ship or a warrant officer on a warship who is responsible for the maintenance of the ship and its equipment
[Old English bātswegen; see boat, swain]

boat•swain

or bo's'n

(ˈboʊ sən)

n.
a warrant officer on a warship, or a petty officer on a merchant vessel, in charge of rigging, anchors, cables, etc.
[1400–50; late Middle English boteswayn; see boat, swain]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.boatswain - a petty officer on a merchant ship who controls the work of other seamenboatswain - a petty officer on a merchant ship who controls the work of other seamen
Jack-tar, mariner, old salt, sea dog, seafarer, seaman, gob, Jack, tar - a man who serves as a sailor
Translations
loďmistr
bådsmand
fedélzetmester
bátsmaîur
bocmanas
bocmanis
loďmajster
lostromoporsum

boatswain

[ˈbəʊsn] Ncontramaestre m

boatswain

[ˈbəʊsən] nmaître m d'équipageboat train ntrain m (assurant la correspondance avec un service de ferry)boat trip n (= excursion) → excursion f en bateau

boatswain

, bosun, bo’s’n
nBootsmann m; boatswain’s mateBootsmanngehilfe m

boatswain

[ˈbəʊsn] nnostromo

boatswain,

bosun

(ˈbəusn) noun
an officer who looks after a ship's boats, ropes, sails etc.
References in classic literature ?
However flattering this compliment, the officer made no reply; but drawing from his belt a little silver whistle, such as boatswains use in ships of war, he whistled three times, with three different modulations.
Neither may they imitate smiths or other artificers, or oarsmen, or boatswains, or the like?
But whose fortune soever was upon the increase, mine seemed to be upon the wane, and I found nothing present, except two or three boatswains, or such fellows, but as for the commanders, they were generally of two sorts: 1.
But now when the boatswain calls all hands to lighten her; when boxes, bales, and jars are clattering overboard; when the wind is shrieking, and the men are yelling, and every plank thunders with trampling feet right over Jonah's head; in all this raging tumult, Jonah sleeps his hideous sleep.
There, I found a virtuous boatswain in his Majesty's service - a most excellent man, though I could have wished his trousers not quite so tight in some places and not quite so loose in others - who knocked all the little men's hats over their eyes, though he was very generous and brave, and who wouldn't hear of anybody's paying taxes, though he was very patriotic.
I have a boatswain who pipes, Livesey; so things shall go man-o'-war fashion on board the good ship HISPANIOLA.
All then proceeded to the poop, which was very handsomely decorated, and seated themselves on the bulwark benches; the boatswain passed along the gangway and piped all hands to strip, which they did in an instant.
There, too, on the approach to the land, assisted by the boatswain and the carpenter, he "gets the anchors over" with the men of his own watch, whom he knows better than the others.
The boatswain died during a storm, so they wrapped him up in a sheet, and put him in his own sea chest, and threw him overboard; but they neglected, in their hurry-skurry, to say prayers over him, and the storm raged and roared louder than ever, and they saw the dead man seated in his chest, with his shroud for a sail, coming hard after the ship, and the sea breaking before him in great sprays like fire; and there they kept scudding day after day and night after night, expecting every moment to go to wreck; and every night they saw the dead boatswain in his sea chest trying to get up with them, and they heard his whistle above the blasts of wind, and he seemed to send great seas, mountain high, after them that would have swamped the ship if they had not put up the deadlights.