bocage


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bocage

(bɒˈkɑːʒ)
n
1. the wooded countryside characteristic of northern France, with small irregular-shaped fields and many hedges and copses
2. (Ceramics) woodland scenery represented in ceramics
[C17: from French, from Old French bosc; see boscage]
References in periodicals archive ?
While Fakhrawi was also in the money in the medium tour final when he went clear riding his mare Saba Du Bocage, only to have two down in the jump off as he pushed hard to try and win the class.
The bank has hired Thomas Deininger, Paul Mehta and Laetitia du Bocage to join the credit sales desk in London.
We really appreciate the opportunity to receive free or low-cost marketing materials from CSCU," said Charmaine Bocage Russo, vice president of marketing at RiverLand Credit Union.
Keeping low through the bocage country [a Norman French mix of woods, pastures, and fields divided by hedgerows], he heard a loud clicking noise behind him, turned, and began running just as a German machine-gunner opened fire on him.
Chelsea figures of this date tend to have disproportionately small heads and to stand on elaborate rococo bases, often with a backdrop of encrusted flowers and leaves known as a bocage.
It is 65 years since these brave men risked everything on the beaches and in the bocage to help loosen Hitler's grip of Fortress Europe but for many it seems like only yesterday.
Both women have sought help from professional genealogist Charlotte Bocage, who specializes in black genealogy.
Espoir Du Bocage, who unseated his rider at the seventh, returned lame and was referred for further examination to Leahurst Veterinary Hospital.
Charles, Service de Medecine Interne et Immunologie Clinique, Hopital du Bocage, BP 1542, 21034 Dijon, France; fax: 33-3 80 29 38 46; email: pierre-emmanuel.
And Tom and Judy Watts' Bocage tablescape will be adorned by WhatEver Works and Nelson's Stone Works.
The game then progresses inland through ruined villages and the infamous bocage - the tightly-packed, high hedgerows that made fighting so vicious in the breakout from Normandy's beachheads.