bodice


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Related to bodice: Liberty bodice

bod·ice

 (bŏd′ĭs)
n.
1. The fitted part of a dress that extends from the waist to the shoulder.
2. A woman's laced outer garment, worn like a vest over a blouse.
3. Obsolete A corset.

[Alteration of bodies, pl. of body.]

bodice

(ˈbɒdɪs)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) the upper part of a woman's dress, from the shoulder to the waist
2. (Clothing & Fashion) a tight-fitting corset worn laced over a blouse, as in certain national costumes, or (formerly) as a woman's undergarment
[C16: originally Scottish bodies, plural of body]

bod•ice

(ˈbɒd ɪs)

n.
1. the part of a woman's dress covering the body above the waistline.
2. a woman's cross-laced, sleeveless outer garment covering the waist and bust, common in peasant dress.
3. Obs. stays or a corset.
[1560–70; bodies, pl. of body]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bodice - part of a dress above the waistbodice - part of a dress above the waist  
dress, frock - a one-piece garment for a woman; has skirt and bodice
plastron - the ornamental front of a woman's bodice or shirt
top - a garment (especially for women) that extends from the shoulders to the waist or hips; "he stared as she buttoned her top"
Translations
صَدْرُ فُسْتان
živůtek
overdel
upphlutur
liemenėviršutinė suknelės dalis
ņieburs
živôtik
korsajkorse

bodice

[ˈbɒdɪs] N [of dress] → canesú m

bodice

[ˈbɒdɪs] ncorsage m

bodice

n
Mieder nt; (of dress also)Oberteil nt
(= vest)Leibchen nt

bodice

:
bodice ripper
bodice-ripping
adj attr (inf) bodice film/novelschwülstiger historischer Film/Roman

bodice

[ˈbɒdɪs] n (of dress) → corpino, corpetto

bodice

(ˈbodis) noun
the upper part of a woman's or child's dress. The dress had an embroidered bodice.
References in classic literature ?
The junction of the bodice and drawers was entirely concealed by one of the many-colored scarfs, whose brilliant hues and rich silken fringe have rendered them so precious in the eyes of Parisian belles.
This black-eyed, wide-mouthed girl, not pretty but full of life- with childish bare shoulders which after her run heaved and shook her bodice, with black curls tossed backward, thin bare arms, little legs in lace-frilled drawers, and feet in low slippers- was just at that charming age when a girl is no longer a child, though the child is not yet a young woman.
Never were hands more exquisite than hers, and it was a joy to look at them when she threaded her needle or adjusted her gold thimble to her taper middle finger as she sewed away on the little night-drawers or fashioned a bodice or a bib.
But she -- the naughty baggage -- little will she care what they put upon the bodice of her gown Why, look you, she may cover it with a brooch, or such like.
She put on a black skirt, but chose the bodice of the evening dress which she liked best: it was of a white damask which was fashionable in those days.
she added, giving Vronsky one finger of the hand in which she held her fan, and with a shrug of her shoulders she twitched down the bodice of her gown that had worked up, so as to be duly naked as she moved forward towards the footlights into the light of the gas, and the sight of all eyes.
Yet Eurylochus fancied that one of them had sea-green hair, and that the close-fitting bodice of a second looked like the bark of a tree, and that both the others had something odd in their aspect, although he could not quite determine what it was, in the little while that he had to examine them.
I send thee here a green hunting suit that my lady the duchess gave me; alter it so as to make a petticoat and bodice for our daughter.
The maiden's gown was soft as satin and fell about her in ample folds, while dainty lace-like traceries trimmed the bodice and sleeves.
Winnie Verloc was a young woman with a full bust, in a tight bodice, and with broad hips.
Now this was written at a time when the black limber bone of the Greenland or Right whale was largely used in ladies' bodices.
There were milkmaids and shepherdesses, with brightly colored bodices and golden spots all over their gowns; and princesses with most gorgeous frocks of silver and gold and purple; and shepherds dressed in knee breeches with pink and yellow and blue stripes down them, and golden buckles on their shoes; and princes with jeweled crowns upon their heads, wearing ermine robes and satin doublets; and funny clowns in ruffled gowns, with round red spots upon their cheeks and tall, pointed caps.