bodkin


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bod·kin

 (bŏd′kĭn)
n.
1. A small, sharply pointed instrument for making holes in fabric or leather.
2. A blunt needle for pulling tape or ribbon through a series of loops or a hem.
3. A long hairpin, usually with an ornamental head.
4. Printing An awl or pick for extracting letters from set type.
5. A dagger or stiletto.

[Middle English boidekin, of unknown origin.]

bodkin

(ˈbɒdkɪn)
n
1. (Knitting & Sewing) a blunt large-eyed needle used esp for drawing tape through openwork
2. (Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) archaic a dagger
3. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) printing a pointed steel tool used for extracting characters when correcting metal type
4. (Clothing & Fashion) archaic a long ornamental hairpin
[C14: probably of Celtic origin; compare Gaelic biodag dagger]

bod•kin

(ˈbɒd kɪn)

n.
1. a small, pointed instrument for making holes in cloth, leather, etc.
2. a blunt, needlelike instrument for drawing tape, cord, etc., through a loop, hem, or the like.
3. a long pin used by women to fasten up the hair.
4. Obs. a small dagger; stiletto.
[1350–1400; Middle English badeken, bo(i)dekyn, of uncertain orig.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bodkin - a dagger with a slender bladebodkin - a dagger with a slender blade  
dagger, sticker - a short knife with a pointed blade used for piercing or stabbing
2.bodkin - formerly a long hairpin; usually with an ornamental head
hairpin - a double pronged pin used to hold women's hair in place
3.bodkin - a small sharp-pointed tool for punching holes in leather or fabric
hand tool - a tool used with workers' hands
4.bodkin - a blunt needle for threading ribbon through loops
hand tool - a tool used with workers' hands
Translations

bodkin

[ˈbɒdkɪn] N
1. (Sew) → aguja f de jareta
2. (Typ) → punzón m
3. (archaic) (= for hair) → espadilla f

bodkin

n
(Sew) → Durchziehnadel f
(Hist: = hairpin) → lange Haarnadel; (obs, = dagger) → Dolch m
References in classic literature ?
Still my husband, cap in hand, persisted in trying to accompany the alcalde, and seeing this my lady, filled with rage and vexation, pulled out a big pin, or, I rather think, a bodkin, out of her needle-case and drove it into his back with such force that my husband gave a loud yell, and writhing fell to the ground with his lady.
A polished bodkin of white petrified shell, with sharp-pointed ends, thrust through a hole in the partition of his nostrils, extended five inches across his face.
Long-Beard laughed, too, the five-inch bodkin of bone, thrust midway through the cartilage of his nose, leaping and dancing and adding to his ferocious appearance.
I shall be shut up with the tire-women else, and have a week of spindle and bodkin, when I would fain be galloping Troubadour up Wilverley Walk, or loosing little Roland at the Vinney Ridge herons.
A toilet is described with the solemnity of an altar raised to the goddess of vanity, and the history of a silver bodkin is given with all the pomp of heraldry.
A man cannot behead with a bodkin," said Brown calmly, "and for this murder beheading was absolutely necessary.
Osborne sitting bodkin opposite, between Captain Dobbin and Amelia.
He sat down cross-legged on the floor among his papers, strung them together with a bodkin and a piece of string--revised them, wrote all the titles and honours by which he was personally distinguished at the head of the first page, and then read the manuscript to me with loud theatrical emphasis and profuse theatrical gesticulation.
Let us have some fresh blood," he said, digging a long bodkin into his finger, and drawing off the resulting drop of blood in a chemical pipette.
For this expedition we partner with experienced Israeli horseman, Yair Sharet, for whom bringing Twain's Holy Land experiences to a new audience is a long-held ambition," said Tom Bodkin, founder of Secret Compass.
Bodkin Properties, an Arkansas LLC with a Switzerland mailing address, paid $L85 million for Foxborough Apartments in Fayetteville.
Tom Bodkin has been named creative director; previously, he'd been deputy managing editor for three years.