body horror


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body horror

n
(Film) a horror film genre in which the main feature is the graphically depicted destruction or degeneration of a human body or bodies
References in periodicals archive ?
TUSK (18) Electric Cinema Cult director Kevin Smith (Chasing Amy/Jay and Silent Bob) returns with a mixture of comedy and terror in this slacker twist on the body horror genre.
Politically incorrect, lowest-common-denominator comedy and body horror humor can be sublime when the timing is sharp and the staging inspired.
If you've been longing for the Cronenberg who was the master of body horror, missing in action since eXistenZ (1999), he's resurrected himself by transferring.
His dream becomes a reality-with unsettling consequences-in this body horror shocker that claims to be "100% medically accurate.
A brilliantly twisted take on the Frankenstein tale with a touch of David Cronenberg-style body horror for good measure.
But dealing with his trademark themes of madness, body horror and sexual panic, this is Cronenberg on familiar territory, despite the parasols and lace bonnets.
From the director of Vide-odrome, The Fly and Naked Lunch we have come to expect visceral cinema with oodles of body horror to make us truly uncomfortable, but in the past few years, specifically with A History of Violence and Eastern Promises, David Cronenberg has veered toward a more intense scrutiny of the reasoning behind his characters' sometimes brutal actions.
Shinya Tsukamoto's celebratory body horror in landmark films like Tetsuo: The Iron Man (1989) and Sogo Ishii's "damn the torpedoes" kinetic thrills in movies like Electric Dragon: 80,000 V (2001) gave birth to Yoshihiro Nishimura, who bid audiences "Welcome to the New Flesh" in 2008's Tokyo Gore Police.
His stuff was called body horror because it was always things happening to people's insides, things erupting from inside the body.
I'm paying tribute to the movies I grew up in the '80s and '90s with this in-your-face body horror flick,'' said first-time director James Gunn, who wrote ``Dawn of the Dead,'' as he munched on Latin cuisine at the after-party at Malo.
John Carpenter's The Thing has been included on the bill to satisfy all you ketchup fans with its own blend of extreme body horror and B-movie aesthetics.
There are strange coincidences in Le Clercq's story that suggest, to me, a Cronenbergian construct of body horror.