body-centred

(redirected from body-centered)

body-centred

adj
(General Physics) (of a crystal) having a lattice point at the centre of each unit cell as well as at the corners. Compare face-centred
References in periodicals archive ?
This hands-free device has sensors and emitters mounted directly onto a vest that can detect environmental obstacles, converting those obstacles into a vibro-tactile code based on body-centered coordinates.
Steve has been a lifelong student of personal growth, exploring conventional religious experience, a variety of alternative practices, most notably Buddhist meditation, 12 Step recovery, and Core Energetics: a body-centered therapeutic method.
This book describes Process-Oriented Coma Work, a system of body-centered techniques developed by Arnold and Amy Mindell for communicating with coma patients.
With the woman's consent and after consultation with her psychologist, monthly somatoemotional release sessions (a body-centered therapy for uncovering and resolving trauma stored in the body) were added to her treatment.
A psychotherapist in New York State who works with children and adults and specializes in sandplay and dream work, McCarthy shares with parents, teachers, therapists, and adults in general an approach to reinstating a sense of wholeness in the child that is body-centered.
While Wallace's references to paganism and body-centered images may cause some readers to not read further, the rest of his text is rich in imagery and ideas that could help pastors rethink their positions in relation to ecology and the Spirit.
Certification Training in Prenatal Counseling and Body-Centered Hypnosis for Childbirth, April 20-21, May 18-19, June 21-22, 2007.
Telling truths about female desire in Woolf's late Victorian milieu or in the first-wave feminist era of Carolee Schneemann, Hannah Wilke, and other body-centered women artists involved a breaking of taboo linked with codes of misogynistic silence.
At temperatures and pressures found at Earth's surface, pure iron has a structure called a body-centered cubic crystal.
In particular, she examines the reciprocity between ritualistic (or symbolic), body-centered experiences and other, remembered orders of thought and expressions of being, and how this interrelationship contributes to the ongoing formation and expression of identity.
Because dance is a body-centered art, sex as a metaphor takes pride of place in much choreography, and so, with the reality of homosexuality taking its rightful place as yet another choice available to the human psyche, how performers touch will be more important than who does the touching.