bog


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bog

 (bôg, bŏg)
n.
1.
a. An area having a wet, spongy, acidic substrate composed chiefly of sphagnum moss and peat in which characteristic shrubs and herbs and sometimes trees usually grow.
b. Any of certain other wetland areas, such as a fen, having a peat substrate. Also called peat bog.
2. An area of soft, naturally waterlogged ground.
3. Chiefly British Slang A restroom or toilet.
v. bogged, bog·ging, bogs
v.tr.
1. To cause to sink in a bog: The bus got bogged down in the muddy road.
2. To hinder or slow: The project got bogged down in haggling about procedures.
v.intr.
To be hindered and slowed.

[Irish Gaelic bogach, from bog, soft; see bheug- in Indo-European roots.]

bog′gi·ness n.
bog′gy adj.

bog

(bɒɡ)
n
1. (Physical Geography) wet spongy ground consisting of decomposing vegetation, which ultimately forms peat
2. (Physical Geography) an area of such ground
3. a place or thing that prevents or slows progress or improvement
4. a slang word for lavatory1
5. slang Austral the act or an instance of defecating
[C13: from Gaelic bogach swamp, from bog soft]
ˈboggy adj
ˈbogginess n

bog1

(bɒg, bɔg)

n., v. bogged, bog•ging. n.
1. wet, spongy ground with soil composed mainly of decayed vegetable matter.
2. an area or stretch of such ground.
v.t., v.i.
3. to sink in or as if in a bog (often fol. by down): We were bogged down with a lot of work.
[1495–1505; < Irish or Scottish Gaelic bogach soft ground (bog soft + -ach n. suffix)]
bog′gish, adj.
bog′gy, adj. -gi•er, -gi•est.
bog′gi•ness, n.

bog2

(bɒg, bɔg)

n.
Usu., bogs.Brit. Slang. a lavatory; bathroom.
[1780–90; probably shortening of bog-house; compare bog to defecate]

bog

(bôg)
An area of wet, spongy ground consisting mainly of decayed or decaying moss and other vegetation. Bogs form as the dead vegetation sinks to the bottom of a lake or pond, where it decays to form peat.

bog


Past participle: bogged
Gerund: bogging

Imperative
bog
bog
Present
I bog
you bog
he/she/it bogs
we bog
you bog
they bog
Preterite
I bogged
you bogged
he/she/it bogged
we bogged
you bogged
they bogged
Present Continuous
I am bogging
you are bogging
he/she/it is bogging
we are bogging
you are bogging
they are bogging
Present Perfect
I have bogged
you have bogged
he/she/it has bogged
we have bogged
you have bogged
they have bogged
Past Continuous
I was bogging
you were bogging
he/she/it was bogging
we were bogging
you were bogging
they were bogging
Past Perfect
I had bogged
you had bogged
he/she/it had bogged
we had bogged
you had bogged
they had bogged
Future
I will bog
you will bog
he/she/it will bog
we will bog
you will bog
they will bog
Future Perfect
I will have bogged
you will have bogged
he/she/it will have bogged
we will have bogged
you will have bogged
they will have bogged
Future Continuous
I will be bogging
you will be bogging
he/she/it will be bogging
we will be bogging
you will be bogging
they will be bogging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been bogging
you have been bogging
he/she/it has been bogging
we have been bogging
you have been bogging
they have been bogging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been bogging
you will have been bogging
he/she/it will have been bogging
we will have been bogging
you will have been bogging
they will have been bogging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been bogging
you had been bogging
he/she/it had been bogging
we had been bogging
you had been bogging
they had been bogging
Conditional
I would bog
you would bog
he/she/it would bog
we would bog
you would bog
they would bog
Past Conditional
I would have bogged
you would have bogged
he/she/it would have bogged
we would have bogged
you would have bogged
they would have bogged
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bog - wet spongy ground of decomposing vegetationbog - wet spongy ground of decomposing vegetation; has poorer drainage than a swamp; soil is unfit for cultivation but can be cut and dried and used for fuel
mire, morass, quag, quagmire, slack - a soft wet area of low-lying land that sinks underfoot
slough - a hollow filled with mud
wetland - a low area where the land is saturated with water
Verb1.bog - cause to slow down or get stuck; "The vote would bog down the house"
slow up, slow, slow down - cause to proceed more slowly; "The illness slowed him down"
2.bog - get stuck while doing something; "She bogged down many times while she wrote her dissertation"
break off, discontinue, stop, break - prevent completion; "stop the project"; "break off the negotiations"

bog

noun
1. marsh, moss (Scot. & Northern English dialect), swamp, slough, wetlands, fen, mire, quagmire, morass, marshland, peat bog We walked steadily across moor and bog.
2. (Brit. informal) lavatory, toilet, loo (Brit. informal), can (U.S. & Canad. slang), john (slang, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), throne (informal), privy, latrine, crapper (taboo slang), khazi (slang), W.C. I'm reading it on the bog.
3. bathroom, lavatory, toilet, loo (Brit. informal), convenience, privy, outhouse, washroom, powder room, water closet, gents or ladies (Brit. informal), ladies' room, little boy's or little girl's room (informal), W.C. 'I'm in the bog!' she heard him call.
bog something or someone down hold up, stick, delay, halt, stall, slow down, impede, slow up The talks have become bogged down with the issue of military reform.

bog

noun
A usually low-lying area of soft waterlogged ground and standing water:
verb
To interfere with the progress of.Also used with down:
Idiom: get in the way of.
Translations
bažinamočálrašeliniště
mosesump
rabasoo
suoneva
močvara
mocsár
mÿri
įklimptipelkėpelkėtas
muklājspurvs
myr
ห้วย
vũng lầy

bog

[bɒg]
A. N
1. (= swamp) → pantano m, ciénaga f
2. (Brit) (= toilet) → retrete m, meadero m
B. CPD bog paper N (Brit) → papel m de wáter
bog roll N (Brit) → rollo m de papel de wáter
bog down VT + ADV to get bogged down (in)quedar atascado (en), hundirse (en) (fig) → empantanarse or atrancarse (en)

bog

[ˈbɒg] n
(= wet land) → tourbière f
(British) (= toilet) → chiottes fplbogged down [ˌbɒgdˈdaʊn] adj
to get bogged down → s'enliser
to get bogged down in sth → s'enliser dans qch
to get bogged down by sth → s'enliser dans qch

bog

n
Sumpf m; (= peat bog)(Torf)moor nt
(Brit inf: = toilet) → Lokus m (inf), → Klo nt (inf)

bog

[bɒg] npalude f (Brit) (fam) (toilet) → cesso
bog down vt + adv to get bogged down (in)impantanarsi (in)

bog

(bog) noun
very wet ground; marsh.
ˈboggy adjective
boggy ground.
be bogged down
to be hindered in movement; to be prevented from making progress. The tractor is bogged down in the mud.

bog

مُسْتَنْقَع bažina mose Sumpf έλος ciénaga suo tourbière močvara pantano moeras myr bagno pântano болото myr ห้วย bataklık vũng lầy 沼泽
References in classic literature ?
I took four lessons, and then I stuck fast in a grammatical bog.
It's like jumping from one bog to another, all through a swamp; borrow of one to pay another, and then borrow of another to pay one,--and these confounded notes falling due before a man has time to smoke a cigar and turn round,--dunning letters and dunning messages,--all scamper and hurry-scurry.
The weapons with which we have gained our most important victories, which should be handed down as heirlooms from father to son, are not the sword and the lance, but the bushwhack, the turf-cutter, the spade, and the bog hoe, rusted with the blood of many a meadow, and begrimed with the dust of many a hard-fought field.
It led me aslant over the hill, through a wide bog, which would have been impassable in winter, and was splashy and shaking even now, in the height of summer.
Then, if you hear of me being discovered dead in a bog or a pit full of snow, your conscience won't whisper that it is partly your fault?
The case is so hopeless, and I feel that I am wallowing in such a bog of nonsense, that I give up all idea of getting out, and abandon myself to my fate.
Beyond this flood a frozen Continent Lies dark and wilde, beat with perpetual storms Of Whirlwind and dire Hail, which on firm land Thaws not, but gathers heap, and ruin seems Of ancient pile; all else deep snow and ice, A gulf profound as that SERBONIAN Bog Betwixt DAMIATA and mount CASIUS old, Where Armies whole have sunk: the parching Air Burns frore, and cold performs th' effect of Fire.
I feel like a novice lumbering through a bog in a midst, jumping from one tussock to another in the mere blind effort to move on without knowing where I am going.
He was obliged to walk upon bog tufts and watch his feet to keep from the oily mire.
Hetty's was a spring-tide beauty; it was the beauty of young frisking things, round-limbed, gambolling, circumventing you by a false air of innocence--the innocence of a young star- browed calf, for example, that, being inclined for a promenade out of bounds, leads you a severe steeplechase over hedge and ditch, and only comes to a stand in the middle of a bog.
From Bewley's bog, with slaughter red, A wanderer hither drew; And oft he stopp'd and turn'd his head, As by fits the night-winds blew.
The whole bog might be filled up with similar matter.