bog rosemary


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Related to bog rosemary: Andromeda glaucophylla, bog laurel, globeflower

bog rosemary

n.
Any of several evergreen shrubs of the genus Andromeda in the heath family, native to northern temperate wetlands and having pink or white urn-shaped flowers grouped in nodding umbels.

bog rosemary

n
(Plants) another name for marsh andromeda
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bog rosemary - wiry evergreen shrub having pendent clusters of white or pink flowersbog rosemary - wiry evergreen shrub having pendent clusters of white or pink flowers; of wet acidic areas in Arctic and Canada to northeastern United States
andromeda - any of several shrubs of the genus Andromeda having leathery leaves and clusters of small flowers
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Andromeda polifolia, also known as bog rosemary, is a small evergreen shrub with bell-shaped white and pink flowers in late spring.
Andromeda polifolia, also known as bog rosemary due to its linear rosemary-like leaves, is a small evergreen shrub with bell-shaped white and pink flowers in late spring.
In the higher moors and uplands of North Yorkshire and Scotland, you can also find plants that were more prevalent during the last ice age: juniper, cloudberry, dwarf cornel and bog rosemary.
Longer-term, the project hopes to buy land on the Migneint to conserve specially adapted plants that thrive on the water logged ground, including sphagnummoss, insect-eating sundews and bog rosemary.
Andromeda polifolia "Blue Ice," the Bog Rosemary, forms a low mounded shrub with superb blue foliage that reminds one of the herb rosemary.
There are however, poisonous impostors to look out for, such as bog rosemary (Andromeda polifolia) and bog laurel (Kalmia polifolia).
This provides an important habitat for species such as the grasshopper warbler, bog rosemary and small red damselfly.
Plants that grow there include cloudberry and crowberry as well as sphagnum mosses, sundew, bog rosemary and cotton grass, which form a habitat for invertebrates such as the emperor moth and mountain bumblebee and for nesting wading birds such as the curlew.
It is hoped the project will sustain a host of specially-adapted plants that thrive on the waterlogged ground including sphagnum moss, insect-eating sundews and bog rosemary.