bogging


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

bog

 (bôg, bŏg)
n.
1.
a. An area having a wet, spongy, acidic substrate composed chiefly of sphagnum moss and peat in which characteristic shrubs and herbs and sometimes trees usually grow.
b. Any of certain other wetland areas, such as a fen, having a peat substrate. Also called peat bog.
2. An area of soft, naturally waterlogged ground.
3. Chiefly British Slang A restroom or toilet.
v. bogged, bog·ging, bogs
v.tr.
1. To cause to sink in a bog: The bus got bogged down in the muddy road.
2. To hinder or slow: The project got bogged down in haggling about procedures.
v.intr.
To be hindered and slowed.

[Irish Gaelic bogach, from bog, soft; see bheug- in Indo-European roots.]

bog′gi·ness n.
bog′gy adj.

bogging

(ˈbɒɡɪŋ)
adj
informal Scot filthy; covered in dirt and grime
References in classic literature ?
I told him, that as he worked so hard at bogging, he required thick boots and stout clothing, which yet were soon soiled and worn out, but I wore light shoes and thin clothing, which cost not half so much, though he might think that I was dressed like a gentleman (which, however, was not the case), and in an hour or two, without labor, but as a recreation, I could, if I wished, catch as many fish as I should want for two days, or earn enough money to support me a week.
Simon Stratton, 32, got down on one knee in the dirty water and said: "I'm bogging you to be my wife.
Simon Stratton, 32, got down on one knee in the water and said: "I'm bogging you to be my wife.