bogland


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Related to bogland: Peat bogs

bogland

(ˈbɒɡˌlænd)
n
an area of wetland, usually extensive
References in periodicals archive ?
The ancient Beltany Stone Circle and historic Raphoe are only a five minute walk away and it is a forty minute drive to beaches, mountains, the rugged coastline and bogland wilderness.
Built on old bogland, it was Cardiff's first publicly-owned park.
We saw acidic peaty bogland punctuated by weather-eroded rocks, stone-built folds and shelters for shepherds tending our sheep's ancestors centuries ago.
I walk him around far out toward the bogland, where Google shows so
Gaelic Irish, colonial, and Anglo-Irish literary engagements with bogland in Ireland appear to be well documented.
4) This article argues that investigating bogland in The Snake's Pass will draw attention to the ways in which Irish bogs are situated precariously among issues of national identity, colonial consciousness, and environmental history, which ultimately results in the marginalisation and degradation of these ubiquitous and emblematic landscapes of Ireland.
The fire, which swept across a hectare of bogland, was reported at 5.
In Bogland (1969), he invoked the metaphor of the well-preserved bodies of people from the Iron Age, found in peat bogs in Ireland and Denmark.
A boardwalk made almost entirely from recycled bags and bottles has been installed above a rare bogland habitat in Scotland.
Unlike home-loving Ratty in The Wind in the Willows, the hamster-sized mammals may trek for weeks across moors, bogland and mountains, covering distances of up to nine miles.
THE wheel of a crashed Spitfire that lay buried in bogland for almost 70 years has finally touched down back at its home base.
If it transpires that seemingly generous minister Sharif has recently been lumbered with 375 acres of bogland, I'll lump on India.