bogwood


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bog·wood

 (bôg′wo͝od′, bŏg′-)
n.
Wood that has been preserved in a peat bog.

bogwood

(ˈbɒɡˌwʊd)
n
(Plants) another name for bogoak
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References in periodicals archive ?
Steven Edgar escaped being sent straight to jail after a court heard how he used a large piece of bogwood as a weapon during a row at the woman's home.
Miss Foley told the court: "During the course of an argument the defendant threw a large, heavy piece of bogwood and threw it at her, which struck her to the back of the head and caused a small wound.
Steven Edgar picked up a large piece of bogwood and threw it at the woman, cutting her head and damaging a wall.
Steven Edgar picked up a large piece of bogwood and threw it as the woman, cutting her head and damaging a wall.
The award, which is a traditional Irish bogwood sculpture by Kieran Higgins, was presented by Dublin Biennial, an independent pop-up exhibition.
The incident in Bogwood Road, Mayfield, Midlothian, was one of almost 1000 bogus calls a year made to Lothian and Borders Fire Service.
Once again blessed with trap one, it looks a cracking make-up especially as Bogwood Sheriff and Kinda Sure are unlikely to do themselves any favours out wide and Roxholme King should be well in command by halfway.
Modern farming, house & road building, tidal action and demands for fuel have all been cutting away at the bog for centuries, exposing much of this bogwood.
By the 1830s bogwoods were used for articles such as chimney-piece what-nots, inkstands, letter racks, nests of boxes, card cases, chessboards and chessmen, handles for table knives and tools as well as 'denoters' of time exhibiting the day, month and date.