boil


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boil 1

 (boil)
v. boiled, boil·ing, boils
v.intr.
1.
a. To change from a liquid to a vapor by the application of heat: All the water boiled away and left the kettle dry.
b. To reach the boiling point.
c. To undergo the action of boiling, especially in being cooked.
2. To be in a state of agitation; seethe: a river boiling over the rocks.
3. To be stirred up or greatly excited, especially in anger: The mere idea made me boil.
v.tr.
1.
a. To vaporize (a liquid) by the application of heat.
b. To heat to the boiling point.
2. To cook or clean by boiling.
3. To separate by evaporation in the process of boiling: boil the maple sap.
n.
1. The condition or act of boiling.
2. Lower Southern US A picnic featuring shrimp, crab, or crayfish boiled in large pots with spices, and then shelled and eaten by hand.
3. An agitated, swirling, roiling mass of liquid: "Those tumbling boils show a dissolving bar and a changing channel there" (Mark Twain).
Phrasal Verbs:
boil down
1. To reduce in bulk or size by boiling.
2. To condense; summarize: boiled down the complex document.
3. To constitute the equivalent of in summary: The scathing editorial simply boils down to an exercise in partisan politics.
boil over
1. To overflow while boiling.
2. To lose one's temper.

[Middle English boillen, from Old French boillir, from Latin bullīre, from bulla, bubble.]

boil′a·ble adj.
Synonyms: boil1, simmer, seethe, stew
These verbs mean, both literally and figuratively, to stir up or agitate. To boil is to heat a liquid until it churns with bubbles. Figuratively it pertains to intense agitation, often from anger: She boiled with rage at the insult.
Simmer denotes gentle cooking just at or below the boiling point. Figuratively it refers to a state of slow, contained ferment: Plans were simmering in his mind. The employees simmered with resentment over the cut in benefits.
To seethe is to boil steadily and vigorously. Its figurative usage can suggest vigorous activity or passionate emotion: "The arc lamp's cone of light seethes with winged insects" (Claire Davis). "The city had ... been seething with discontent" (John R. Green).
Stew refers literally to slow boiling and figuratively to a persistent but not violent state of agitation: "They don't want a man to fret and stew about his work" (William H. Whyte, Jr.)

boil 2

 (boil)
n.
A painful, circumscribed pus-filled inflammation of the skin and subcutaneous tissue usually caused by a local staphylococcal infection. Also called furuncle.

[Middle English bile, from Old English bȳle.]

boil

(bɔɪl)
vb
1. (Chemistry) to change or cause to change from a liquid to a vapour so rapidly that bubbles of vapour are formed copiously in the liquid. Compare evaporate
2. to reach or cause to reach boiling point
3. (Cookery) to cook or be cooked by the process of boiling
4. (intr) to bubble and be agitated like something boiling; seethe: the ocean was boiling.
5. (intr) to be extremely angry or indignant (esp in the phrase make one's blood boil): she was boiling at his dishonesty.
6. (intr) to contain a boiling liquid: the pot is boiling.
n
the state or action of boiling (esp in the phrases on the boil, off the boil)
[C13: from Old French boillir, from Latin bullīre to bubble, from bulla a bubble]
ˈboilable adj

boil

(bɔɪl)
n
(Pathology) a red painful swelling with a hard pus-filled core caused by bacterial infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissues, esp at a hair follicle. Technical name: furuncle
[Old English bӯle; related to Old Norse beyla swelling, Old High German būlla bladder, Gothic ufbauljan to inflate]

boil1

(bɔɪl)
v.i.
1. to change from a liquid to a gaseous state, typically as a result of heat, producing bubbles of gas that rise to the surface of the liquid.
2. to reach the boiling point.
3. to be in an agitated or violent state: The sea boiled in the storm.
4. to be deeply angry or upset.
5. to contain, or be contained in, a liquid that boils: The kettle is boiling. Don't let the vegetables boil.
v.t.
6. to bring to the boiling point.
7. to cook (something) in boiling water: to boil eggs.
8. to separate (salt, sugar, etc.) from a solution containing it by boiling off the liquid.
9. boil down,
a. to reduce or lessen by boiling.
b. to shorten; abridge.
10. boil down to, to be reduced to; amount to: It boils down to a question of ethics.
11. boil over,
a. to overflow while or as if while boiling; erupt.
b. to be unable to repress anger, excitement, etc.
n.
12. the act or state of boiling: Bring the water to a boil.
13. an area of agitated, swirling water.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French boillir < Latin bullīre to effervesce, boil, v. derivative of bulla bubble]
syn: boil, seethe, simmer, stew are used figuratively to refer to agitated states of emotion. To boil suggests being very hot with anger or rage: He was boiling when the guests arrived late. To seethe is to be deeply stirred, violently agitated, or greatly excited: a mind seething with conflicting ideas. To simmer means to be at the point of bursting out or boiling over: to simmer with curiosity; to simmer with anger. To stew is an informal term that means to worry, or to be in a restless state of anxiety and excitement: to stew over one's troubles.

boil2

(bɔɪl)

n.
a painful circumscribed inflammation of the skin with a pus-filled inner core.
[before 1000; Middle English bile, bule, Old English bȳle; c. Old Saxon bula, Old High German bulla; akin to Old Norse beyla hump]

boil

(boil)
Verb
To change from a liquid to a gaseous state by heating or being heated to the boiling point.
Noun
The act or condition of boiling: brought the water to a boil.

boil


Past participle: boiled
Gerund: boiling

Imperative
boil
boil
Present
I boil
you boil
he/she/it boils
we boil
you boil
they boil
Preterite
I boiled
you boiled
he/she/it boiled
we boiled
you boiled
they boiled
Present Continuous
I am boiling
you are boiling
he/she/it is boiling
we are boiling
you are boiling
they are boiling
Present Perfect
I have boiled
you have boiled
he/she/it has boiled
we have boiled
you have boiled
they have boiled
Past Continuous
I was boiling
you were boiling
he/she/it was boiling
we were boiling
you were boiling
they were boiling
Past Perfect
I had boiled
you had boiled
he/she/it had boiled
we had boiled
you had boiled
they had boiled
Future
I will boil
you will boil
he/she/it will boil
we will boil
you will boil
they will boil
Future Perfect
I will have boiled
you will have boiled
he/she/it will have boiled
we will have boiled
you will have boiled
they will have boiled
Future Continuous
I will be boiling
you will be boiling
he/she/it will be boiling
we will be boiling
you will be boiling
they will be boiling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been boiling
you have been boiling
he/she/it has been boiling
we have been boiling
you have been boiling
they have been boiling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been boiling
you will have been boiling
he/she/it will have been boiling
we will have been boiling
you will have been boiling
they will have been boiling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been boiling
you had been boiling
he/she/it had been boiling
we had been boiling
you had been boiling
they had been boiling
Conditional
I would boil
you would boil
he/she/it would boil
we would boil
you would boil
they would boil
Past Conditional
I would have boiled
you would have boiled
he/she/it would have boiled
we would have boiled
you would have boiled
they would have boiled

boil

To cook in water at 212 °F. At this temperature water bubbles rapidly.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.boil - a painful sore with a hard core filled with pus
gumboil - a boil or abscess on the gums
staphylococcal infection - an infection with staphylococcus bacteria; usually marked by abscess formation
2.boil - the temperature at which a liquid boils at sea level; "they brought the water to a boil"
temperature - the degree of hotness or coldness of a body or environment (corresponding to its molecular activity)
Verb1.boil - come to the boiling point and change from a liquid to vapor; "Water boils at 100 degrees Celsius"
change state, turn - undergo a transformation or a change of position or action; "We turned from Socialism to Capitalism"; "The people turned against the President when he stole the election"
boil over, overboil - overflow or cause to overflow while boiling; "The milk is boiling over"
freeze - change to ice; "The water in the bowl froze"
2.boil - immerse or be immersed in a boiling liquid, often for cooking purposes; "boil potatoes"; "boil wool"
change - undergo a change; become different in essence; losing one's or its original nature; "She changed completely as she grew older"; "The weather changed last night"
overboil - boil excessively; "The peas are overboiled"
simmer - boil slowly at low temperature; "simmer the sauce"; "simmering water"
3.boil - bring to, or maintain at, the boiling point; "boil this liquid until it evaporates"
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
decoct - extract the essence of something by boiling it
4.boil - be agitatedboil - be agitated; "the sea was churning in the storm"
seethe, roll - boil vigorously; "The liquid was seething"; "The water rolled"
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
5.boil - be in an agitated emotional state; "The customer was seething with anger"
bubble over, spill over, overflow - overflow with a certain feeling; "The children bubbled over with joy"; "My boss was bubbling over with anger"
ferment - be in an agitated or excited state; "The Middle East is fermenting"; "Her mind ferments"
sizzle - seethe with deep anger or resentment; "She was sizzling with anger"
be - have the quality of being; (copula, used with an adjective or a predicate noun); "John is rich"; "This is not a good answer"

boil

1
verb
1. simmer, bubble, foam, churn, seethe, fizz, froth, effervesce I stood in the kitchen, waiting for the water to boil.
2. bring to the boil, cook, simmer Peel the potatoes and boil them.
3. be furious, storm, rage, rave, fume, be angry, crack up (informal), see red (informal), go ballistic (slang, chiefly U.S.), be indignant, fulminate, foam at the mouth (informal), blow a fuse (slang, chiefly U.S.), fly off the handle (informal), go off the deep end (informal), wig out (slang), go up the wall (slang) She was boiling with anger.
boil down to something amount to, mean, come to, equal, add up to, come down to What they want boils down to just one thing.
boil something down reduce, concentrate, precipitate (Chemistry), thicken, condense, decoct He boils down red wine and uses what's left.
boil something up make hot, make, warm up, heat up Boil up some coffee

boil

2
noun pustule, gathering, swelling, blister, blain, carbuncle, furuncle (Pathology) a boil on her nose

boil

verb
1. To cook (food) in liquid heated to the point of steaming:
2. To be in a state of emotional or mental turmoil:
phrasal verb
boil away
To pass off as vapor, especially when heated:
phrasal verb
boil down
To reduce in complexity or scope:
phrasal verb
boil over
To be or become angry:
Informal: steam.
Idioms: blow a fuse, blow a gasket, blow one's stack, breathe fire, fly off the handle, get hot under the collar, hit the ceiling, lose one's temper, see red.
Translations
يَغْليدُمَّـلغلىيَسْلُقُيَطْبُخُ بالغَلْي
vařitnežituhervarbeďar
kogebyld
keittääkiehuakiehuttaapaise
kipjetikuhati
graftarkÿlisjóîa
沸かす沸騰する煮る
...을 끓이다끓다
augonisfurunkulsvārītvārīties
variť sa
kuhati v vreli vodiprekipetivreti
koka
ต้มทำให้เดือด
çıbanhaşlamakkayna makkaynamakkaynatmak
đun sôisôi

boil

1 [bɔɪl] N (Med) → divieso m, furúnculo m, chupón m (Andes), postema f (Mex)

boil

2 [bɔɪl]
A. N to be on the boilestar hirviendo (fig) [situation] → estar a punto de estallar; [person] → estar furioso
to bring to the boil; bring to a boil (US) → calentar hasta que hierva, llevar a ebullición
to come to the boil; come to a boil (US) → comenzar a hervir (fig) → entrar en ebullición
to go off the boildejar de hervir
B. VThervir, hacer hervir, calentar hasta que hierva (Culin) [+ liquid] → hervir; [+ vegetables, meat] → herventar, cocer; [+ egg] → pasar por agua
C. VI
1.hervir
to boil dryquedarse sin caldo/agua
2. (fig) it makes me boilme hace rabiar
to boil with rageestar furioso
to boil with indignationestar indignado
see also blood
boil away VI + ADV (= evaporate completely) → evaporarse, reducirse (por ebullición)
boil down VT + ADV [+ sauce etc] → reducir por cocción (fig) → reducir a forma más sencilla
boil down to VI + ADVreducirse a
it all boils down to thisla cosa se reduce a lo siguiente
boil over VI + ADV
1. [liquid] → irse, rebosar
2. (fig) → desbordarse
boil up VI + ADV (lit) [milk] → hervir, subir
anger was boiling up in himestaba a punto de estallar de ira
they are boiling up for a real rowse están enfureciendo de verdad

boil

[ˈbɔɪl]
vt
to boil some water → faire bouillir de l'eau
to boil the kettle [+ metal kettle] → mettre la bouilloire sur le feu; [+ electric kettle] → brancher la bouilloire
[+ vegetables] → faire cuire à l'eau
to boil an egg → faire cuire un œuf
vi [water] → bouillir
The water's boiling → L'eau bout.
The water's boiled → L'eau a bouilli.
[person] to be boiling with anger → bouillir de colère
to be boiling with rage → bouillir de rage
n
(= swelling) → furoncle m
(= boiling point) to come to the boil (British) to come to a boil > (US)bouillir
to bring to the boil (British) to bring to a boil > (US)porter à ébullition
boil down
vi (fig) to boil down to sth → se ramener à qch, se résumer à qch
boil over
vidéborder

boil

1
n (Med) → Furunkel m

boil

2
vi
(lit)kochen; (water also, Phys) → sieden; the kettle was boilingdas Wasser im Kessel kochte; boiling oilsiedendes Öl; allow to boil gently (Cook) → langsam kochen; to let the kettle boil drydas Wasser im Kessel verkochen lassen
(fig inf: = be hot) boiling hot waterkochend heißes Wasser; it was boiling (hot) in the officees war eine Affenhitze im Büro (inf); I was boiling (hot)mir war fürchterlich heiß; you’ll boil in that sweaterin dem Pullover schwitzt du dich ja tot (inf)
(fig inf: = be angry) → kochen, schäumen (→ with vor +dat)
(fig, sea, river) → brodeln, tosen
vtkochen; boiled/hard boiled eggweich/hart gekochtes Ei; boiled potatoesSalzkartoffeln pl
n to bring something to the (Brit) or a (US) boiletw aufkochen lassen; to keep something on the boiletw kochen or sieden lassen; to be on/come to/go off the boilkochen/zu kochen anfangen/aufhören

boil

1 [bɔɪl] n (Med) → foruncolo

boil

2 [bɔɪl]
1. n to bring to the boil (Am) to bring to a boilportare a ebollizione
to come to the boil (Am) to come to a boil → raggiungere l'ebollizione
on the boil → che bolle
it's off the boil → ha smesso di bollire
2. vt(far) bollire; (potatoes, meat) → (far) bollire, (far) lessare
boiled egg → uovo alla coque
boiled ham → prosciutto cotto
boiled potatoes → patate fpl bollite or lesse
3. vi (water) → bollire
the kettle is boiling → l'acqua bolle
to let a saucepan boil dry → lasciar evaporare tutta l'acqua da una pentola
to boil with rage (fig) → bollire di rabbia
boil away vi + adv (liquid) → evaporare (fig) → sfumare
boil down vi + adv (fig) to boil down toridursi a
boil over vi + advtraboccare (bollendo) (fig) (anger) → esplodere
boil up vt + advfar bollire

boil1

(boil) verb
1. to turn rapidly from liquid to vapour when heated. I'm boiling the water; The water's boiling.
2. to cook by boiling in water etc. I've boiled the potatoes.
ˈboiler noun
a vessel in which water is heated or steam is produced.
ˈboiling-point noun
the temperature at which something boils.
boil down to
to amount to; to indicate as a final analysis or judgement. It all boils down to money; What it boils down to is that you have to make a choice between family and career.
boil over
to boil and overflow. The pan of water boiled over and spilt on the floor.

boil2

(boil) noun
an inflamed swelling on the skin. His neck is covered with boils.

boil

يَسْلُقُ, يَغْلي vařit, vařit se koge kochen βράζω cocer, hervir keittää, kiehua bouillir, faire bouillir kipjeti, kuhati bollire, lessare 沸かす, 沸騰する ...을 끓이다, 끓다 koken koke ugotować się, zagotować się ferver варить, кипеть koka ต้ม, ทำให้เดือด kaynamak, kaynatmak đun sôi, sôi 沸腾, 煮沸

boil

n. forúnculo, Cuba nacido; Mex. elacote;
vt. hervir, cocer;
___ downreducirse por ebullición.

boil

n forúnculo (form), nacido, absceso (de la piel), grano (grande); vt (water) hervir; (vegetables, meat, etc.) cocer, hervir; vi hervir
References in classic literature ?
So utterly lost was he to all sense of reverence for the many marvels of their majestic bulk and mystic ways; and so dead to anything like an apprehension of any possible danger from encountering them; that in his poor opinion, the wondrous whale was but a species of magnified mouse, or at least water-rat, requiring only a little circumvention and some small application of time and trouble in order to kill and boil.
Yes; get Jack something warm, and then boil me some gruel.
Floating on with closed eyes and muffled ears, you neither see the rocks bristling not far off in the bed of the flood, nor hear the breakers boil at their base.
The contents of the pan began to boil, and he turned to plunge his hand into the bowl; I conjectured that this preparation was probably for our supper, and, being hungry, I resolved it should be eatable; so, crying out sharply, 'I'LL make the porridge
The Master at Salem House lifted the latch of one of a number of little black doors that were all alike, and had each a little diamond-paned window on one side, and another little diamond- paned window above; and we went into the little house of one of these poor old women, who was blowing a fire to make a little saucepan boil.
A handsome mince-pie had been made yesterday morning (which accounted for the mincemeat not being missed), and the pudding was already on the boil.
I felt my eyes start forward in their sockets, my blood seemed to boil within me, it rushed into my head, and down my face their ran two tears of blood.
There was sand in our eyes, sand in our teeth, sand in our suppers, sand dancing in the spring at the bottom of the kettle, for all the world like porridge beginning to boil.
The queen at once went out and took a cup of water, and said over it some words that made it boil as if it were on the fire.
I had long since prepared my tincture; I purchased at once, from a firm of wholesale chemists, a large quantity of a particular salt which I knew, from my experiments, to be the last ingredient required; and late one accursed night, I compounded the elements, watched them boil and smoke together in the glass, and when the ebullition had subsided, with a strong glow of courage, drank off the potion.
A third mixed some sweet wine with water in a silver bowl and put golden cups upon the tables, while the fourth brought in water and set it to boil in a large cauldron over a good fire which she had lighted.
And there stood Cadmus, Phoenix, and Cilix, gazing at this sad spectacle, through their tears, until they could no longer distinguish the bull's snowy head from the white-capped billows that seemed to boil up out of the sea's depths around him.