boiling point


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

boiling point

n.
1. Abbr. BP
a. The temperature at which a liquid boils at a fixed pressure, especially under standard atmospheric conditions.
b. The temperature at which the vapor pressure of a liquid is equal to the ambient atmospheric pressure.
2. Informal
a. The point at which one loses one's temper.
b. The point of crisis; the turning point.

boiling point

n
1. (Chemistry) the temperature at which a liquid boils at a given pressure, usually atmospheric pressure at sea level; the temperature at which the vapour pressure of a liquid equals the external pressure
2. informal the condition of being angered or highly excited

boil′ing point`


n.
1. the temperature at which the vapor pressure of a liquid is equal to the pressure of the atmosphere on the liquid, equal to 212°F (100°C) for water at sea level. Abbr.: b.p.
2. the point beyond which one becomes visibly angry, outraged, or the like.
3. the point at which matters reach a crisis.
[1765–75]

boil·ing point

(boi′lĭng)
The temperature at which a liquid changes to a vapor or gas. As the temperature of a liquid rises, the pressure of escaping vapor also rises, and at the boiling point the pressure of the escaping vapor is equal to that exerted on the liquid by the surrounding air, causing bubbles to form. Typically boiling points are measured at sea level. At higher altitudes, where atmospheric pressure is lower, boiling points are lower. The boiling point of water at sea level is 212°F (100°C); that of mercury is 673.84°F (356.58°C).

boiling point

The temperature at which a liquid’s vapor pressure equals external pressure.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.boiling point - the temperature at which a liquid boils at sea level; "they brought the water to a boil"
temperature - the degree of hotness or coldness of a body or environment (corresponding to its molecular activity)
2.boiling point - being highly angry or excited; ready to boil over; "after an hour of waiting I was at the boiling point"
excitableness, excitability, volatility - being easily excited
Translations

boiling point

npunto di ebollizione

boil·ing point

n. punto de ebullición.
References in classic literature ?
Vladimir started, for in his veins the lust of passion had welled until it had reached boiling point.
No twilight on her surface; night following day and day following night with the suddenness of a lamp which is extinguished or lighted amid profound darkness-- no transition from cold to heat, the temperature falling in an instant from boiling point to the cold of space.
But he is mistaken; I shall not leave so near the queen that source of discord with which the deceased cardinal so often caused the anger of the king to rage above the boiling point.
Luigi's southern blood leaped to the boiling point in a moment under the sharp humiliation of this insult delivered in the presence of four hundred strangers.
Wilson; at present, it's about up to the boiling point," said George.
Operating the utility room Mensa boiling point - washing dishes, cutlery, glasses and trays and stainless steel containers from the kitchen area by use of labor to Topfsp?
Evans products have a boiling point of more than 180C, while traditional 50/50 coolants boil at about 103C.
Boiling Point explores those breaking points in the context of the characters within each story and the… unusual situations they find themselves in.
I then ask students to predict the boiling point of [H.
Fincher's life was in a real mess at this time, perhaps without even knowing it he had reached boiling point and when Gabi did what she did that night he flipped.
Brake fluid is a safety-critical item and it is essential that this is recognised and its boiling point is tested on a regular basis.
The most significant difference is the boiling point, but consideration for differences in the freezing point and surface tension need to be accounted for as well.