bold


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bold

 (bōld)
adj. bold·er, bold·est
1.
a. Fearless and daring; courageous: a bold leader.
b. Requiring or exhibiting courage or daring: a bold voyage to unknown lands. See Synonyms at brave.
2. Unduly forward and brazen; impudent: a bold, sassy child.
3. Strikingly different or unconventional; arresting or provocative: "[He] laid out a bold, new vision for America's leading universities" (Jerome Karabel).
4.
a. Clear and distinct to the eye; conspicuous: bold colors; a bold pattern.
b. Strong or pronounced; prominent: the bold flavor of ginger.
5. Steep or abrupt in grade or terrain: "The two walk along the high, bold, rocky shore" (Harriet Beecher Stowe).
6. Printing Boldface.

[Middle English, from Old English bald; see bhel- in Indo-European roots.]

bold′ly adv.
bold′ness n.

bold

(bəʊld)
adj
1. courageous, confident, and fearless; ready to take risks
2. showing or requiring courage: a bold plan.
3. immodest or impudent: she gave him a bold look.
4. standing out distinctly; conspicuous: a figure carved in bold relief.
5. very steep: the bold face of the cliff.
6. imaginative in thought or expression: the novel's bold plot.
7. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) printing set in bold face
n
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) printing short for bold face
[Old English beald; related to Old Norse ballr dangerous, terrible, baldinn defiant, Old High German bald bold]
ˈboldly adv
ˈboldness n

bold

(boʊld)

adj. -er, -est.
1. not hesitating or fearful in the face of danger; courageous.
2. scorning or ignoring the rules of propriety; forward; impudent.
3. requiring courage and daring: bold deeds.
4. beyond the usual limits of conventional thought or action; inventive or imaginative: a bold solution to a perplexing problem.
5. striking or conspicuous to the eye; flashy; showy: a bold pattern.
6. steep; abrupt: a bold promontory.
7. typeset in boldface.
8. Obs. trusting; assured.
[before 1000; Middle English bald, bold, Old English b(e)ald; c. Old Saxon, Old High German bald, Old Norse ballr dire]
bold′ly, adv.
bold′ness, n.
syn: bold, brazen, forward, presumptuous refer to behavior or manners that break the rules of propriety. bold suggests shamelessness and immodesty: a bold stare. brazen suggests the same, together with a defiant manner: a brazen liar. forward implies making oneself unduly prominent or bringing oneself to notice with too much assurance: The forward young man challenged the speaker. presumptuous implies overconfidence, or taking too much for granted: It was presumptuous of her to think she could defeat the champion.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bold - a typeface with thick heavy linesbold - a typeface with thick heavy lines  
font, fount, typeface, face, case - a specific size and style of type within a type family
Adj.1.bold - fearless and daring; "bold settlers on some foreign shore"; "a bold speech"; "a bold adventure"
adventuresome, adventurous - willing to undertake or seeking out new and daring enterprises; "adventurous pioneers"; "the risks and gains of an adventuresome economy"
fearless, unafraid - oblivious of dangers or perils or calmly resolute in facing them
forward - used of temperament or behavior; lacking restraint or modesty; "a forward child badly in need of discipline"
brave, courageous - possessing or displaying courage; able to face and deal with danger or fear without flinching; "Familiarity with danger makes a brave man braver but less daring"- Herman Melville; "a frank courageous heart...triumphed over pain"- William Wordsworth; "set a courageous example by leading them safely into and out of enemy-held territory"
timid - showing fear and lack of confidence
2.bold - clear and distinct; "bold handwriting"; "a figure carved in bold relief"; "a bold design"
conspicuous - obvious to the eye or mind; "a tower conspicuous at a great distance"; "wore conspicuous neckties"; "made herself conspicuous by her exhibitionistic preening"
3.bold - very steep; having a prominent and almost vertical front; "a bluff headland"; "where the bold chalk cliffs of England rise"; "a sheer descent of rock"
steep - having a sharp inclination; "the steep attic stairs"; "steep cliffs"

bold

adjective
2. impudent, forward, fresh (informal), confident, rude, cheeky, brash, feisty (informal, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), saucy, pushy (informal), brazen, in-your-face (Brit. slang), shameless, sassy (U.S. informal), unabashed, pert, insolent, barefaced, spirited, forceful Men do not like girls who are too bold.
impudent conservative, retiring, modest, shy, polite, courteous, meek, tactful
4. heavy, clear, thick, distinct, pronounced It's a big book with bold print.
Quotations
"Bold knaves thrive without one grain of sense,"
"But good men starve for want of impudence" [John Dryden Constantine the Great]
Proverbs
"The bold are always lucky"

bold

adjective
Translations
بارِزٌ وَواضِحٌجَريء، جَسورواضِحٌ
smělýtroufalýtučnývýraznýdrzý
dristigfedhalvfed skrift som ``like this''livligmodig
hrabarodvažan
bátorfélkövérkövér
áberandifeitletraîurhugaîur, djarfur
akiplėšiškasdrąsadrąsiairyškus
drosmīgsizceltspārdrošsskaidri iezīmētsskaidrs
moedigvetvetgedrukt
polotučný
smel
fetmodig
belirgincesurcüretkârgöze çarpangözüpek

bold

[bəʊld]
A. ADJ (bolder (compar) (boldest (superl)))
1. (= brave) [person, attempt, plan] → atrevido, audaz
2. (= forward) [child, remark] → atrevido, descarado
if I may be or make so bold (frm) → si me permite el atrevimiento (frm)
to make bold with sth (frm) → servirse de algo como si fuera suyo
(as) bold as brassmás fresco que una lechuga
3. (= striking) [colour, clothes, design] → llamativo; [brush stroke, handwriting, move] → enérgico; [shape, relief, contrast] → marcado
4. (Typ) [letters] → en negrita
B. N (Typ) → negrita f
C. CPD bold type Nnegrita f

bold

[ˈbəʊld]
adj
(= fearless) [person] → hardi(e), intrépide
if I may be so bold (= if you don't mind my asking) → si je peux me permettre
[move, reform] → audacieux/euse
(= impudent) (pejorative)effronté(e)
[colour] → vif(vive); [pattern] → voyant(e)
[handwriting] → assuré(e)
n
in bold (TYPOGRAPHY) (type, text)en gras

bold

adj (+er)
(= brave)kühn (geh), → mutig; deed, plan alsoverwegen
(= impudent, forward)unverfroren, dreist; to be or make so bold as to …sich (dat)erlauben, zu …, sich erkühnen, zu … (geh); might I be so bold as to …?wenn ich es mir erlauben darf, zu …?; might I make so bold as to help myself?darf ich so frei sein und mich bedienen?; to make bold with somethingsich (dat)die Freiheit herausnehmen, sich bei etw einfach zu bedienen; as bold as brass (inf)rotzfrech (inf)
(= striking) colours, pattern, stripeskräftig; checks alsogrob; strokes alsokühn (geh); handwritingkraftvoll, kühn (geh); stylekraftvoll, ausdrucksvoll; to bring out in bold reliefstark hervortreten lassen
(Typ) → fett; (= secondary bold)halbfett; bold typeFettdruck m; to set something in bold (type)etw fett/halbfett drucken

bold

[bəʊld] adj
a. (brave, person, attempt) → audace (fig) (plan, move) → ardito/a
b. (forward, child, remark) → sfacciato/a, sfrontato/a
c. (striking, line, pattern) → vistoso/a, che salta all'occhio; (colour) → deciso/a

bold

(bəuld) adjective
1. daring or fearless. a bold plan of attack.
2. striking and well-marked. a dress with bold stripes.
3. (of type) thick and clear, like this.
ˈboldly adverb
ˈboldness noun
bold as brass
very cheeky. She walked in late as bold as brass.
References in classic literature ?
Therefore we see it hath done wonders, in popular states; but with senates, and princes less; and more ever upon the first entrance of bold persons into action, than soon after; for boldness is an ill keeper of promise.
This was a fearful rival to the” Bold Dragoon,” as our readers will the more readily perceive when we add that the same sonorous names were to be seen over a newly erected store in the village, a hatter’s shop, and the gates of a tan-yard.
Bold Navigators- Equestrian Indians and Piscatory Indians, Difference in Their Physical Organization.
So thus they went in threescore companies of five to Sherwood Forest, to take Robin Hood, each constable wishing that he might be the one to find the bold outlaw, or at least one of his band.
But he grew old - This knight so bold - And o'er his heart a shadow Fell, as he found No spot of ground That looked like Eldorado.
A HUNTER, not very bold, was searching for the tracks of a Lion.
Anna Pavlovna whispered the next words in advance, like an old woman muttering the prayer at Communion: "Let the bold and insolent Goliath.
The bold attempt had miscarried by a fortuitous circumstance; and unless by some exceptional event, they could now never reach the moon's disc.
But there were others who saw, and now and again, glancing at those about him, he noted two young girls who looked back from the row in front, a dozen seats along, and who smiled at him with bold eyes.
And yet William the Red, and Henry, his second and third brothers, were successively preferred to him by the voice of the nation, Robert had every merit which can be pleaded for Richard; he was a bold knight, a good leader, generous to his friends and to the church, and, to crown the whole, a crusader and a conqueror of the Holy Sepulchre; and yet he died a blind and miserable prisoner in the Castle of Cardiff, because he opposed himself to the will of the people, who chose that he should not rule over them.
We can imagine the start of surprise felt by each of these bold fellows upon seeing the other in such strange company.
But in the western or black chamber the effect of the fire-light that streamed upon the dark hangings through the blood-tinted panes, was ghastly in the extreme, and produced so wild a look upon the countenances of those who entered, that there were few of the company bold enough to set foot within its precincts at all.