bollard


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bol·lard

 (bŏl′ərd)
n.
1. Nautical A thick post on a ship or wharf, used for securing ropes and hawsers.
2. One of a series of posts preventing vehicles from entering an area.
3. A projecting bulge of snow or ice used as an anchor for a rope in mountaineering.

[Middle English, probably from bole, tree trunk; see bole1.]

bollard

(ˈbɒlɑːd; ˈbɒləd)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) a strong wooden or metal post mounted on a wharf, quay, etc, used for securing mooring lines
2. (Civil Engineering) Brit a small post or marker placed on a kerb or traffic island to make it conspicuous to motorists
3. (Mountaineering) mountaineering an outcrop of rock or pillar of ice that may be used to belay a rope
[C14: perhaps from bole1 + -ard]

bol•lard

(ˈbɒl ərd)

n.
1.
a. a thick low post, usu. of iron or steel, mounted on a wharf or the like, to which mooring lines from vessels are attached.
2. Brit. one of a series of short posts, esp. for excluding motor vehicles from a road.
[1835–45]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bollard - a strong post (as on a wharf or quay or ship for attaching mooring lines)bollard - a strong post (as on a wharf or quay or ship for attaching mooring lines); "the road was closed to vehicular traffic with bollards"
bitthead - the upper end of a bitt
pier, wharf, wharfage, dock - a platform built out from the shore into the water and supported by piles; provides access to ships and boats
post - an upright consisting of a piece of timber or metal fixed firmly in an upright position; "he set a row of posts in the ground and strung barbwire between them"
riding bitt - one of the large bitts used to secure the cable of a dropped anchor
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
Translations
عَمود رَبْطِ حِبالِ المَرْكِب
pacholeuliční patník
betonpælfortøjningspæl
pollaritolppa
bornebittebollard
kikötõbakterelõoszlop
pollistöpull
knechtasstulpelis
barjera
cestný pätníkpoler
iskele babasıkısa işaret direği

bollard

[ˈbɒləd] N (Brit) (at roadside) → baliza f (Naut) → noray m, bolardo m

bollard

[ˈbɒlərd ˈbɒlɑːrd] n
(British) (= concrete post) → borne f
(for mooring)bitte f d'amarrage

bollard

n (on quay, road) → Poller m

bollard

[ˈbɒləd] n (on quay) → bitta (Brit) (to bar way) → pilastrino di chiusura al traffico; (at junction) → colonnina luminosa

bollard

(ˈbəlaːd) noun
1. a post for controlling traffic. The pedestrian shopping area has been closed off with bollards.
2. a short post on a wharf or ship round which ropes are fastened.
References in periodicals archive ?
They had to dig up one bollard, move the van and then put it back in again.
In addition to the cost of installation, building owners must pay to the city an annual fee of $125 per bollard.
Each bollard has self-contained hydraulic pumps and integrated battery backup.
By adjusting the louvres within the bollard head, which is set at a 45 degree angle, rotation and slight modification to the light distribution is achieved.
Army and Navy have started to use pop-up bollard security road barriers, wedge barrier systems and cable-crash beams supplied by CompuDyne Corporation's Norshield Security Products division, in Montgomery, Ala.
the bollard with pupils from Southwold Primary School
Coun Don Blake (Con Knowle), cabinet member for regeneration and community development, said: 'I am happy to declare a bollard 'amnesty' if it means we will get some of them back on the basis that they must be somewhere.
With a fully concealed lamp and reflector system, the Vision Bollard produces glare-free illumination and comes standard with an impact-resistant clear acrylic lens.
There is no danger that, by allowing this suit to proceed, we will thrust the secular courts into the constitutionally untenable position of passing judgment on questions of religious faith or doctrine," Judge William Fletcher wrote in Bollard v.
Bollard, who claims he was subjected to unwanted sexual advances over a period of five and a half years, is seeking $1 million in damages.
In late 2006, two tractor tugs will join the Constellation fleet, including one of the Foss-built new DOLPHIN class ASD tractor tugs with 5000HP and 65 short tons of Bollard pull.
based manufacturer of commercial and sports lighting, is introducing its new wildlife-friendly amber LED bollard light, boasting the highest lumen output available in any of its bollards to date.