bollard


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bol·lard

 (bŏl′ərd)
n.
1. Nautical A thick post on a ship or wharf, used for securing ropes and hawsers.
2. One of a series of posts preventing vehicles from entering an area.
3. A projecting bulge of snow or ice used as an anchor for a rope in mountaineering.

[Middle English, probably from bole, tree trunk; see bole1.]

bollard

(ˈbɒlɑːd; ˈbɒləd)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) a strong wooden or metal post mounted on a wharf, quay, etc, used for securing mooring lines
2. (Civil Engineering) Brit a small post or marker placed on a kerb or traffic island to make it conspicuous to motorists
3. (Mountaineering) mountaineering an outcrop of rock or pillar of ice that may be used to belay a rope
[C14: perhaps from bole1 + -ard]

bol•lard

(ˈbɒl ərd)

n.
1.
a. a thick low post, usu. of iron or steel, mounted on a wharf or the like, to which mooring lines from vessels are attached.
2. Brit. one of a series of short posts, esp. for excluding motor vehicles from a road.
[1835–45]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bollard - a strong post (as on a wharf or quay or ship for attaching mooring lines)bollard - a strong post (as on a wharf or quay or ship for attaching mooring lines); "the road was closed to vehicular traffic with bollards"
bitthead - the upper end of a bitt
pier, wharf, wharfage, dock - a platform built out from the shore into the water and supported by piles; provides access to ships and boats
post - an upright consisting of a piece of timber or metal fixed firmly in an upright position; "he set a row of posts in the ground and strung barbwire between them"
riding bitt - one of the large bitts used to secure the cable of a dropped anchor
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
Translations
عَمود رَبْطِ حِبالِ المَرْكِب
pacholeuliční patník
betonpælfortøjningspæl
pollaritolppa
bornebittebollard
kikötõbakterelõoszlop
pollistöpull
knechtasstulpelis
barjera
cestný pätníkpoler
iskele babasıkısa işaret direği

bollard

[ˈbɒləd] N (Brit) (at roadside) → baliza f (Naut) → noray m, bolardo m

bollard

[ˈbɒlərd ˈbɒlɑːrd] n
(British) (= concrete post) → borne f
(for mooring)bitte f d'amarrage

bollard

n (on quay, road) → Poller m

bollard

[ˈbɒləd] n (on quay) → bitta (Brit) (to bar way) → pilastrino di chiusura al traffico; (at junction) → colonnina luminosa

bollard

(ˈbəlaːd) noun
1. a post for controlling traffic. The pedestrian shopping area has been closed off with bollards.
2. a short post on a wharf or ship round which ropes are fastened.
References in periodicals archive ?
These temporary structures will be replaced this month by more attractive temporary blocks in advance of the rollout of the permanent metal bollard installation beginning this March.
The bollard types utilised on the project were created to meet ASTM F2656-07 M50 P1 requirements.
One version with an integrated electromechanical operator for average use frequencies; a variant with an integrated hydraulic operator for very frequent use and the third variant being an automatic bollard RI-H with reinforced cylinder material, offering particularly high protection.
Alison Major said: "They look awful, they should have been a normal traffic bollard.
AN innovative business which is only a year old already has huge interest in its bollard testing equipment from all over the world.
Alan Bollard said they are working on a strategic study for free trade on Asia and the
The benefits of FTAAP in theory are huge and the main reason is that it brings together the three mega economies, namely United States, China and Japan and for economies like the Philippines, it may mean big, positive gains as well, Alan Bollard, executive director of the Apec secretariat, said in a briefing here Saturday.
The two men lifted the bollard off the little boy but he died in hospital from head injuries.
International Resource News-November 13, 2014--Comfort Suites, Florida selects Access Fixtures LED area lights, LED bollard lights and LED landscape lighting
New Zealand may be dealing with the aftermath of the large increase in private debt for quite some time, Reserve Bank Governor Alan Bollard said today.
One bollard is prominent outside Conwy Castle, in a UN World Heritage Site visited by hundreds of thousands of people each year.
And the lads charge householders pounds 2 a bollard, hoping to help meet fees of up to pounds 9,000 a year.