bondager

bondager

(ˈbɒndɪdʒə)
n
someone who performs bondservice; a bondman
Translations
bondageur
References in periodicals archive ?
I had no idea what a bondager was either until I got on my friendly Google and the more I learned, the more in awe I am of these women who are just unknown.
He had to hire a woman himself and was responsible for housing, feeding and paying her which, for the bondager, often meant the hardest work for the least return.
Given the play she is starring in is called Bondagers some people have got the wrong idea - but the dirt only comes from the tons of earth which set the scene in the play about the lives of 19th century female agricultural labourers.
This woman, not necessarily the wife, who would be busy with children and running the home, could be someone entirely unrelated and was known here as a bondager.
Having grown up on a farm herself, the bondager stories connected.
In reality, she knew that this would never be her lot in life and she accepted the days of backbreaking farmwork that came once she was hired out as a bondager to raise money for her family.
The play, set on a Scottish farm in 1860, follows the experiences of these bondager women.
Bondagers was a term given to females in the 1800s who worked on large farms along Scotland's border with England.
In addition, there was a flute solo and a specially choreographed bondager dance.
1991 Sue Glover's Bondagers, about female labourers in the Borders, was hailed as a Scottish classic and continues to be revived to this day.
Other plays by women writers produced recently by Charabanc include Bondagers by Sue Glover, and Me and My Pal by Gillian Plowman.
Award-winning play, set in the Borders in the 19th century, tells the story of the Bondagers, the women workers of the great Border Farms of that period.