bondwoman


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bond·wom·an

 (bŏnd′wo͝om′ən)
n.
A woman bondservant.

[Middle English bondewomman, from bonde, serf; see bondage.]

bondwoman

(ˈbɒndˌwʊmən) or

bondswoman

n, pl -women
a female serf or slave

bond•wom•an

(ˈbɒndˌwʊm ən)

n., pl. -wom•en.
a female slave.
[1350–1400]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bondwoman - a female bound to serve without wages
bond servant - someone bound to labor without wages
2.bondwoman - a female slave
slave - a person who is owned by someone
References in classic literature ?
This new order of things disgusted him, and he howled dismally for `Marmar', as his angry passions subsided, and recollections of his tender bondwoman returned to the captive autocrat.
This son, Megapenthes, was born to him of a bondwoman, for heaven vouchsafed Helen no more children after she had borne Hermione, who was fair as golden Venus herself.
US has emboldened the perception that Phalestine and Kashmir issue will not be resolved politically but militarily by force and that the UN is a toothless organisation which is a bondwoman of great powers.
But he who was of the bondwoman was born after the flesh; but he of the freewoman was by promise.
However, Manon again neglects the cost of Sarah's actions; though she fled with her daughter, the bondwoman left her son behind.
Dhul-Nun al-Misri says: I was bondwoman infinity Black, when I was awake half the night prayer, he god, you love me the truth.
Jackson and her family were held as property in Missouri; Dubois lived in New Jersey both as a bondwoman and as a free woman.
She is herself an escaped bondwoman and this the second company that she has brought forth out of the land of servitude at great risk to herself.
According to Folieta of Geneua, in The Mahumetane or Turkish History (1600), Soleman's marriage to a freed bondwoman had been the result of realization on his part that "it was not lawful to keep a free woman", in his harem.
Reynolds purchased bondwoman Elizabeth and her two children in 1780.
Here the bondwoman referred to the Old Testament covenant of works, particularly circumcision and its New Testament corollary in the pedobaptist tradition, infant baptism.
Ishmael was Abraham's first son, the son of his bondwoman, Hagar.