boodler

boodler

(ˈbuːdələ)
n
slang US a person involved in bribery or corruption
References in periodicals archive ?
Gamester, murderer, body-snatcher and kidnapper may appeal to a Hogarth, but what challenge finds his pencil in the countenance of the boodler, the savings-bank wrecker or the ballot-box stuffer?
Briber and boodler and grafter are often "good men," judged by the old tests, and would have passed for virtuous in the American community of 70 years ago.
Having perforce to build men of willow into a social fabric that calls for oak, we see on all hands monstrous treacheries--adulterators, peculators, boodlers, grafters, violating the trust others have placed in them.
A boodler is a person who gives or takes bribes, according to my dictionary - Jo
A boodler was a derogatory term used by critics of the day, to describe a person who personally profited from public subsidies that had not benefitted the community as a whole.
Dissatisfaction with the lighting service provided by the Port Arthur Water, Light and Power Company was such that old boodlers like George T.
Representative John Dingell, the Michigan Democrat sometimes called "Tailpipe John" for his understanding attitude about auto exhaust emissions and no mean boodler himself, called the Senate amendment "deeply flawed," and added that decisions on what drugs to test and how "should be left to scientific peer review and not made by the Congress in this manner.
The forum has been too much taken over to hysterics, paranoids, and boodlers on all sides.
Folk rode a wave of popularity to the governorship when muckraker Lincoln Steffens praised him in magazine articles as the circuit attorney who convicted " boodlers "(bribers)" in St.
Harmony and order could be restored by driving the monopolists and boodlers and cheats from the temple of property.
In the tradition of Lincoln Steffens, who set out in 1902 to expose the shame of America's cities, Summers wants to indict the boodlers.