book learning


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book learning

n.
Knowledge acquired through study, especially of written material, in contrast to knowledge acquired through practical experience.

book′-learn′ed (bo͝ok′lûr′nĭd) adj.
References in classic literature ?
He had no book learning, no art, like the other men.
For that matter, she found in Billy a certain health and rightness, a certain essential integrity, which she prized more highly than all book learning and bank accounts.
But I ought to tell you that Renard was a Parisian, and dependent on his father, a wholesale grocer, who had educated his son with a view to making a notary of him; so Renard had come by a certain amount of book learning before he had been drawn by the conscription and had to bid his desk good-bye.
The book is written with humor and occasionally might spur you to indulge in a little more book learning.
The notion of textbooks and teaching materials is a set of educational resources for students (manual, Student~s Book, notebook TD, cards, book learning at some teaching methods, dictionaries, encyclopedias.
She is, she explains, better at book learning than at learning by doing, yet she is thrilled to participate as a reporter in a Haisla Rediscovery Camp where teen boys fish and gather and learn the histories of the people of the area.
In this world turned upside down the secure world of genteel manners and book learning is overthrown by its brash adoption by the disreputable urban working classes whose very trades--dustmen, sweeps, scavengers--were widely characterized through repeated tropes of dirt, violence, disorder, and irruption into the spaces of society reserved for the genteel and the gentlemanly.
This comprehensive text covers theories, research, practical skills, attention to trends (social diversity, long-distance relationships, and social media), and opportunities to apply text book learning to life.
In the opening of his book Learning to See: A Matter of Light, Howard Brandston tackles this issue when he writes "The question is not what you look at, but what you see.
The United States has not been attacked by terrorists since that day, so something must be working, but the general approach has been fundamentally flawed, according University of Arizona marine ecologist Rafe Sagarin in his new book Learning from the Octopus.