book-keeping


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Related to book-keeping: Double entry bookkeeping

book-keeping

n
(Accounting & Book-keeping) the skill or occupation of maintaining accurate records of business transactions
ˈbook-ˌkeeper n
Translations

book-keeping

[ˈbʊkˌkiːpɪŋ] ncontabilità
References in classic literature ?
When she tried to extend the field of her activities in the direction of stenography and book-keeping her health broke down, and six months on her feet behind the counter of a department store did not tend to restore it.
Do you know anything about book-keeping or accounts?
He was a bulky, fat man, very strong in the matter of book-keeping, and very weak in everything else; round as a round O, simple as how-do-you-do, --a man who came to his office with measured steps, like those of an elephant, and returned with the same measured tread to the place Royale, where he lived on the ground-floor of an old mansion belonging to him.
Perhaps they encouraged and stimulated him to exertion, for, during the next two weeks, all his spare hours, late at night and early in the morning, were incessantly devoted to acquiring the mysteries of book-keeping and some other forms of mercantile account.
The book-keeping of The Orb and all the rest of them was certainly a burlesque revelation but the public did not care for revelations of that kind.
The process by which this unvarying result was attained, whatever the premises, might have been stated by Mr Henry Gowan thus: 'I claim to be always book-keeping, with a peculiar nicety, in every man's case, and posting up a careful little account of Good and Evil with him.
The whitewashed room was pure white as of old, the methodical book-keeping was in peaceful progress as of old, and some distant howler was banging against a cell door as of old.
But, you see, the best hand in the world'll not get you a better place than a copying-clerk's, if you know nothing of book-keeping,--nothing of accounts.
Why, you know nothing about book-keeping, to begin with, and not so much of reckoning as a common shopman.
I'd better set about learning book-keeping, hadn't I, uncle?
But it's such a nuisance and bother; I've been at school all this while learning Latin and things,--not a bit of good to me,--and now my uncle says I must set about learning book-keeping and calculation, and those things.
If he had taught me book-keeping by double entry and after the Italian method, as he did Lucy Bertram, I could teach you, Tom.