book-learning

book-learning

n
1. knowledge gained from books rather than from direct personal experience
2. formal education
References in classic literature ?
But, troubled as I was, by my want of boyish skill, and of book-learning too, I was made infinitely more uncomfortable by the consideration, that, in what I did know, I was much farther removed from my companions than in what I did not.
You'll learn law enough to look after your own property when I'm out o' the light, and you'll have to be solid with the best men in the market (they are useful later); and above all, you'll have to stow away the plain, common, sit-down-with-your-chin-on-your-elbows book-learning.
When freedom came, the slaves were almost as well fitted to begin life anew as the master, except in the matter of book-learning and ownership of property.
They are busy early and late, sir, early and late; and in bye-times, as on this holiday, they go to book-learning.
Chiko is fascinated with another detainee, Tai, a street boy who cannot read or write but masters essential skills beyond book-learning.
Book-learning, he finds, is delayed for as long as possible: "As a rule, they don't do much reading, except for a few story-books, till they are about fifteen years old" (News 25).
As in other Right-wing governments of the time, a variety of spokespersons extolled the virtues of education for "character" as opposed to book-learning, associated in France with the Third Republic's secular schools.
The arena of Grafton's explorations is the world of printed texts in the Republic of Letters over several centuries, but he is deeply concerned, too, with the role of practical experience in the life of book-learning, with "three-dimensional" as well as literary remains, and with the communities of science, natural as well as human, that have struggled to recover, to assemble, and to make available knowledge of all sorts.
He threw out school-style teaching and book-learning for morning-long classes in which no English was used, in class or at the coffee machine.
Lines like: 'There was book-learning, my lost powers,/And religion once in an ocean of grass' suggest loss of faith, but are not conclusive.