bookish


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book·ish

 (bo͝ok′ĭsh)
adj.
1. Given to, characterized by, or resulting from the habitual reading of books; studious.
2. Relying chiefly on book learning rather than practical experience; impractical or unworldly: a scholarly but not bookish instructor.
3. Literary, formal, or erudite. Used of language.

book′ish·ly adv.
book′ish·ness n.

bookish

(ˈbʊkɪʃ)
adj
1. fond of reading; studious
2. consisting of or forming opinions or attitudes through reading rather than direct personal experience; academic: a bookish view of life.
3. of or relating to books: a bookish career in publishing.
ˈbookishly adv
ˈbookishness n

book•ish

(ˈbʊk ɪʃ)

adj.
1. given or devoted to reading or study.
2. more acquainted with books than with real life.
3. of or pertaining to books; literary.
[1560–70]
book′ish•ly, adv.
book′ish•ness, n.

bookish

Fond of reading books or studying.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.bookish - characterized by diligent study and fondness for reading; "a bookish farmer who always had a book in his pocket"; "a quiet studious child"
scholarly - characteristic of scholars or scholarship; "scholarly pursuits"; "a scholarly treatise"; "a scholarly attitude"

bookish

adjective studious, learned, academic, intellectual, literary, scholarly, erudite, pedantic, well-read, donnish, swotty (Brit. informal) a bookish socialist

bookish

adjective
1. Devoted to study or reading:
2. Characterized by a narrow concern for book learning and formal rules, without knowledge or experience of practical matters:
Translations

bookish

[ˈbʊkɪʃ] ADJ [learning] → basado en libros, libresco (frm); [person] → estudioso
her dowdy, bookish imagesu imagen aburrida, de ratón de biblioteca

bookish

[ˈbʊkɪʃ] adj
(= studious) → studieux/euse
(= book-loving) → qui aime lirebookkeeper [ˈbʊkkiːpər] ncomptable mf

bookish

adjgelehrt (pej, hum); (= given to reading)lesewütig; (= not worldly)lebensfremd; language, expressionbuchsprachlich; (pej)trocken, papieren; a bookish wordein Wort ntder Schriftsprache; he is a very bookish personer hat die Nase dauernd in einem Buch; (= not worldly)er ist ein richtiger Stubengelehrter (pej); bookish styleBuchstil m; (pej)papierener Stil

bookish

[ˈbʊkɪʃ] adj (person) → (troppo) studioso/a; (phrase) → libresco/a
References in classic literature ?
We are not about to start on a squirrel hunt, or to drive a deer into the Horican, but to outlie for days and nights, and to stretch across a wilderness where the feet of men seldom go, and where no bookish knowledge would carry you through harmless.
Sometimes her English is daintily prim and bookish and captivating.
I am sorry for you, my child, but I am very poor, I care nothing for bookish rubbish, I shall not be there.
As one will, with one's most serious experiences, hastening to laugh lest one should weep, as the old philosopher said, I had made some fun out of my quest, in the form of a paper for a bookish society to which I belonged, on "Woman as a Learned Pursuit.
Most of the lodgers are respectable, educated, and even bookish people.
They think Charles might not be learned and bookish enough to please Lady Russell, and that therefore, she persuaded Anne to refuse him.
At times, nevertheless, it did seem unaccountable to her that a decidedly bookish, musical, thinking young man should have chosen deliberately to be a farmer, and not a clergyman, like his father and brothers.
On the other hand, the exhaustive mental search for them distracted my thoughts until the stars were back in the sky; and now I had a new occupation, saying to myself all the poetry I could remember, especially that of the sea; for I was a bookish fellow even then.
With Pfuel was Wolzogen, who expressed Pfuel's thoughts in a more comprehensible way than Pfuel himself (who was a harsh, bookish theorist, self-confident to the point of despising everyone else) was able to do.
Casaubon and her sister than his delight in bookish talk and her delight in listening.
He's vulgar and hysterical and bookish, but I don't think that sums him up.
Of course, my philosophy had always recognized the inevitableness of the love-call sooner or later; but long years of bookish silence had made me inattentive and unprepared.