bookishness


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book·ish

 (bo͝ok′ĭsh)
adj.
1. Given to, characterized by, or resulting from the habitual reading of books; studious.
2. Relying chiefly on book learning rather than practical experience; impractical or unworldly: a scholarly but not bookish instructor.
3. Literary, formal, or erudite. Used of language.

book′ish·ly adv.
book′ish·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bookishness - exaggerated studiousness
studiousness - diligent study
References in classic literature ?
But that did not trouble me: I knew, I felt that I should be understood and that this very bookishness might be an assistance.
The girls on the Gucci catwalk embraced their bookishness with pussy-bow blouses, knitted beanies and prim glasses.
In reading Upton and Meta's fictionalized accounts of their marriage (although only Upton's was published), Eby finds that each brought a bookishness and commitment to progressive ideals to their union.
But the bookishness and pragmatism that strike mainstream Republican leaders as virtues highlight the potential difficulty that Bush may face in igniting the passions of more conservative members of the party.
James admits that Frankie is a "bit of a goody-two-shoes"-she does not drink or indulge in casual sex like the Crawfords-but hopes that Frankie will be sympathetic and "recognisably Fanny Price in her awkwardness, her bookishness and most importantly her steadfastness.
As we have seen already with the parody of the women's textbook, the physicality and bookishness of shunga made it an appropriate genre for satire.
In part, this accounts for the bookishness of these late essays, for Emerson is fond of quoting or referring to older writers whose command of language was exceptional.
The autobiographical elements are clear--Clough's boyhood holidays with cousins, his bookishness, his resignation from his fellowship, his recent travels.
His bookishness, along with his incipient homosexuality, made him a perpetual outcast--an intimate stranger to his beloved but highly judgmental, fundamentalist county in rural southeastern Tennessee.
Freedom's just another word for bookishness in this Biennial.
It is Chaucer's bookishness that is interesting, not the place where his reading occurs.
There is a palpable excitement in the air, and just below the staff members' bookishness bubbles a genuine enthusiasm for all of these rows and racks and stacks of military antiquities.