bookstall


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book·stall

 (bo͝ok′stôl′)
n.
A stall where books are sold, as on a street.

bookstall

(ˈbʊkˌstɔːl)
n
(Commerce) a stall or stand where periodicals, newspapers, or books are sold. US word: newsstand

book•stall

(ˈbʊkˌstɔl)

n.
1. a booth or stall at which books are sold, usu. secondhand.
2. Brit. newsstand.
[1790–1800]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bookstall - a shop where books are soldbookstall - a shop where books are sold    
shop, store - a mercantile establishment for the retail sale of goods or services; "he bought it at a shop on Cape Cod"
Translations

bookstall

[ˈbʊkstɔːl] N (at station) → quiosco m (de libros); (at fair) → puesto m de libros

bookstall

[ˈbʊkstɔːl] n (= shop) → kiosque m à journaux

bookstall

[ˈbukˌstɔːl] n (in station) → edicola, chiosco (dei giornali); (secondhand books) → bancarella (dei libri)
References in classic literature ?
I carried them, one after another, to a bookstall in the City Road - one part of which, near our house, was almost all bookstalls and bird shops then - and sold them for whatever they would bring.
He cared for nothing else but reading, and once when his father was ill and unable to attend to his bookstall, he asked his son to do it for him.
There were two flies waiting, two porters, a bookstall, and a refreshment room with a neglected beauty pining behind the bar.
Every detail of the day had been so carefully thought out that the young couple, after the wedding-breakfast, had ample time to put on their travelling-clothes, descend the wide Mingott stairs between laughing bridesmaids and weeping parents, and get into the brougham under the traditional shower of rice and satin slippers; and there was still half an hour left in which to drive to the station, buy the last weeklies at the bookstall with the air of seasoned travellers, and settle themselves in the reserved compartment in which May's maid had already placed her dove-coloured travelling cloak and glaringly new dressing-bag from London.
There he paused at the bookstall to add to his light luggage a number of cheap murder stories, which he read with great pleasure, and without any premonition that he was about to walk into as strange a story in real life.
I picked it up on a bookstall in London--very cheap, too.
I just happened to buy the thing at a bookstall, and thought it would make a good play.
Newman hastened, with joyful steps, to inform Mrs Kenwigs of his friend's acquiescence, and soon returning, brought back word that they would be happy to see him in the first floor as soon as convenient; that Mrs Kenwigs had, upon the instant, sent out to secure a second-hand French grammar and dialogues, which had long been fluttering in the sixpenny box at the bookstall round the corner; and that the family, highly excited at the prospect of this addition to their gentility, wished the initiatory lesson to come off immediately.
She bought paper and pencil at the bookstall, and entered an A.
In the 1890s, Edward Moyse ran a bookstall in Mann Island, near to his home in Redcross Street where he lived above a barber's shop with 15-year-old John Needham, a boy who did chores for him.
He said he happily spent a lot of time at a bookstall in the commercial area and picked up three books that were otherwise not available in the UAE.
1848: WH Smith opened its first railway bookstall at Euston Station, London, the start of multiple retailing in Britain.