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1. One who spends much time reading or studying.
2. Any of various insects, especially booklice and silverfish, that infest books and feed on the paste in the bindings.


1. a person excessively devoted to studying or reading
2. (Animals) any of various small insects that feed on the binding paste of books, esp the book louse



1. a person devoted to reading.
2. any of various insects that feed on books, esp. a booklouse.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bookworm - a person who pays more attention to formal rules and book learning than they meritbookworm - a person who pays more attention to formal rules and book learning than they merit
purist - someone who insists on great precision and correctness (especially in the use of words)
bookman, scholar, scholarly person, student - a learned person (especially in the humanities); someone who by long study has gained mastery in one or more disciplines
2.bookworm - someone who spends a great deal of time reading
reader - a person who enjoys reading
دودَةُ كُتُب ، مولَعٌ بالقِراءه
kitap kurdu


[ˈbʊkwɜːm] N (fig) → ratón m de biblioteca


[ˈbʊkwɜːrm] ndévoreur/euse m/f de livres, rat m de bibliothèque


[ˈbʊkˌwɜːm] n (fig) → topo di biblioteca


(buk) noun
1. a number of sheets of paper (especially printed) bound together. an exercise book.
2. a piece of writing, bound and covered. I've written a book on Shakespeare.
3. a record of bets.
1. to buy or reserve (a ticket, seat etc) for a play etc. I've booked four seats for Friday's concert.
2. to hire in advance. We've booked the hall for Saturday.
ˈbookable adjective
able to be reserved in advance. Are these seats bookable?
ˈbooking noun
a reservation.
ˈbooklet (-lit) noun
a small, thin book. a booklet about the history of the town.
ˈbookbinding noun
putting the covers on books.
ˈbookbinder noun
ˈbookcase noun
a set of shelves for books.
ˈbooking-office noun
an office where travel tickets etc are sold. a queue at the station booking-office.
ˈbookmaker noun
a professional betting man who takes bets and pays winnings.
ˈbookmark noun
something put in a book to mark a particular page.
ˈbookseller noun
a person who sells books.
ˈbookshelf noun
a shelf on which books are kept.
ˈbookshop noun
a shop which sells books.
ˈbookworm noun
a person who reads a lot.
booked up
having every ticket sold. The theatre is booked up for the season.
book in
to sign one's name on the list of guests at an hotel etc. We have booked in at the Royal Hotel.
by the book
strictly according to the rules. She always does things by the book.
References in classic literature ?
I've wanted it so long," said Jo, who was a bookworm.
In this chair, from one year's end to another, sat that prodigious bookworm, Cotton Mather, sometimes devouring a great book, and sometimes scribbling one as big.
It seems that an old bookworm who has a book and curio shop in Baltimore discovered between the leaves of a very old Spanish manuscript a letter written in 1550 detailing the adventures of a crew of mutineers of a Spanish galleon bound from Spain to South America with a vast treasure of "doubloons" and "pieces of eight," I suppose, for they certainly sound weird and piraty.
To a poor bookworm and invalid like myself such a blow is paralyzing.
She used to tell him that he would have made a first-rate old bookworm if only he hadn't had a family of six to support, and six children, she added, charmingly confident of universal sympathy, didn't leave one much time for being a bookworm.
Casaubon: it never occurred to him that a girl to whom he was meditating an offer of marriage could care for a dried bookworm towards fifty, except, indeed, in a religious sort of way, as for a clergyman of some distinction.
I was told,' said he, 'that you were a perfect bookworm, Miss Grey: so completely absorbed in your studies that you were lost to every other pleasure.
He looked perfectly bowed down with remorse last time I saw him," said Will, regarding Tom with eyes full of fun, for Will was a boy as well as a bookworm, and relished a joke as well as scatter-brained Tom.
This old fellow is Mac, the bookworm, called Worm for short.
Johnson's father was a bookworm, like his son, rather than a tradesman.
This was what the patient, faithful lovers had privately planned and quietly waited for years ago; and in due time they were united, to the astonishment of the little world they lived in, that had long since declared them both born to single blessedness; affirming it impossible that the pale, retiring bookworm should ever summon courage to seek a wife, or be able to obtain one if he did, and equally impossible that the plain-looking, plain-dealing, unattractive, unconciliating Miss Millward should ever find a husband.
Porson was an odd-looking man, and so was Doctor Johnson; all these bookworms are.