boomerang kid

boomerang kid

n
(Sociology) a young adult who, after having lived on his or her own for a time, returns to live in the parental home, usually due to financial problems caused by unemployment or the high cost of living independently
References in periodicals archive ?
Rice is a classic boomerang kid, leaving home on several occasions before returning to the nest again.
I started working on `Dustin' about six years ago, and the boomerang kid syndrome had not reached full blossom, but I think that it has now," Kelley said.
The odds ratio [exp(B)] gives the odds of parents reporting positive assessments of their boomerang kid living arrangement given one category of an independent variable compared to a reference (omitted) category, while controlling for the effects of all other variables in the model.
The rise of the Boomerang Kid - those who have been forced to return to the family home due to economic circumstance - is being compounded by a lack of affordable housing.
The network introduced two new comedies on Tuesday that will premiere in March: ``The Loop,'' about 20-something friends in Chicago, and ``Free Ride,'' a partially improvised comedy about a boomerang kid forced to return to live with his parents in his small-town Midwestern home after enjoying the good life at UC Santa Barbara.
The Boomerang Kid - whenever anyone at work asks a question, he always replies: "I'll get back to you on that.
Meanwhile, during his days with Scottish & Newcastle, reader Nick Wilson worked with a bloke known as The Boomerang Kid.
Rows can start when boomerang kids expect things to be as they were before they went away to college or university.
Be aware of key issues for families today such as boomerang kids
Jeffrey Jensen Arnett, a psychologist at Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts, sees boomerang kids as the continuation of this centuries-long trend.
These beliefs are said to be particularly prevalent among young people, with 55% of boomerang kids and 59% of individual renters saying that children have an obligation to support parents in later life.
Call it a guest house for your in-laws, a crash-pad for your boomerang kids, or a source of rental income.