boot


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Related to boot: Boot disk

boot 1

 (bo͞ot)
n.
1. A durable covering for the foot and part or much of the leg, usually made of leather, fabric, plastic, or rubber.
2. A protective covering, especially a sheath to enclose the base of a floor-mounted gear shift lever in a car or truck.
3. Chiefly British An automobile trunk.
4.
a. A kick.
b. Slang An unceremonious dismissal, as from a job. Used with the.
c. Slang A swift, pleasurable feeling; a thrill.
5. A Denver boot.
6. A marine or navy recruit in basic training.
7. Computers The process of starting or restarting a computer.
8. boots An instrument of torture, used to crush the foot and leg.
tr.v. boot·ed, boot·ing, boots
1. To put boots on.
2. To kick: booted the ball into the goal.
3. Slang To discharge unceremoniously. See Synonyms at dismiss.
4. Computers To start (a computer) by loading an operating system from a disk.
5. To disable (a vehicle) by attaching a Denver boot.
6. Baseball To misplay (a ground ball).

[Middle English bote, from Old French.]

boot 2

 (bo͞ot)
intr.v. boot·ed, boot·ing, boots
To be of help or advantage; avail.
n.
1. Chiefly Southern & Midland US See lagniappe.
2. Archaic Advantage; avail.
Idiom:
to boot
In addition; besides: The new cruise ship was not only the biggest in the world, but the fastest to boot.

[Middle English boten, to be of help, from Old English bōtian, from bōt, help; see bhad- in Indo-European roots.]

boot

(buːt)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) a strong outer covering for the foot; shoe that extends above the ankle, often to the knee. See also chukka boot, top boot, Wellington boots, surgical boot
2. (Automotive Engineering) an enclosed compartment of a car for holding luggage, etc, usually at the rear. US and Canadian name: trunk
3. (Automotive Engineering) a protective covering over a mechanical device, such as a rubber sheath protecting a coupling joining two shafts
4. (Automotive Engineering) US and Canadian a rubber patch used to repair a puncture in a tyre
5. (Historical Terms) an instrument of torture used to crush the foot and lower leg
6. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège) a protective covering for the lower leg of a horse
7. a kick: he gave the door a boot.
8. slang Brit an ugly person (esp in the phrase old boot)
9. slang US a navy or marine recruit, esp one in training
10. (Computer Science) computing short for bootstrap4a
11. bet one's boots to be certain: you can bet your boots he'll come.
13. die with one's boots on
a. to die while still active
b. to die in battle
14. fill one's boots informal to take or do as much of something as one wants
15. lick the boots of to be servile, obsequious, or flattering towards
16. put the boot in slang
a. to kick a person, esp when he or she is already down
b. to harass someone or aggravate a problem
c. to finish off (something) with unnecessary brutality
17. the boot slang dismissal from employment; the sack
18. the boot is on the other foot the boot is on the other leg the situation is or has now reversed
19. too big for one's boots self-important or conceited
vb
20. (tr) (esp in football) to kick
21. (tr) to equip with boots
22. (tr) informal
a. (often foll by out) to eject forcibly
b. to dismiss from employment
23. (Computer Science) Also: boot up to start up the operating system of (a computer) or (of a computer) to begin operating
[C14 bote, from Old French, of uncertain origin]

boot

(buːt)
vb (usually impersonal)
archaic to be of advantage or use to (a person): what boots it to complain?.
n
1. obsolete an advantage
2. dialect something given in addition, esp to equalize an exchange: a ten pound boot to settle the bargain.
3. to boot as well; in addition: it's cold and musty, and damp to boot.
[Old English bōt compensation; related to Old Norse bōt remedy, Gothic bōta, Old High German buoza improvement]

boot1

(but)
n.
1. a covering of leather, rubber, or the like, for the foot and all or part of the leg.
2. an overshoe, esp. one of rubber or other waterproof material.
3. any sheathlike protective covering: a boot for a weak automobile tire.
4.
a. the receptacle or place into which the top of a convertible car fits when lowered.
b. a cloth covering for this receptacle or place.
5. Brit. the trunk of an automobile.
7. a U.S. Navy or Marine recruit.
8. a kick.
9. the boot, Slang. a dismissal; discharge: to give someone the boot for being always late.
10. Informal. a sensation of pleasure or amusement: I get a big boot from the kids.
11. a fumble of a baseball batted on the ground, usu. to the infield.
v.t.
12. to kick; drive by kicking.
13. to fumble (a ground ball).
14. to put boots on; equip or provide with boots.
15. Also, bootstrap. to start (a computer) by loading the operating system.
16. Slang. to dismiss; discharge.
Idioms:
die with one's boots on, to die while still active in one's work.
[1275–1325; Middle English bote < Anglo-French, Old French; of uncertain orig.]

boot2

(but)
n.
1. Archaic. something given into the bargain.
2. Obs.
a. advantage.
b. remedy; relief; help.
v.i., v.t.
3. Archaic. to be of profit or advantage (to); avail.
Idioms:
to boot, in addition; besides.
[before 1000; Middle English bote, Old English bōt advantage]

boot3

(but)

n.
[1585–95; see booty]

boot

trunk

In British English, the boot of a car is the covered space, usually at the back, where you put things such as luggage or shopping.

Is the boot open?

In American English, this part of a car is called the trunk.

We put our bags in the trunk.

boot


Past participle: booted
Gerund: booting

Imperative
boot
boot
Present
I boot
you boot
he/she/it boots
we boot
you boot
they boot
Preterite
I booted
you booted
he/she/it booted
we booted
you booted
they booted
Present Continuous
I am booting
you are booting
he/she/it is booting
we are booting
you are booting
they are booting
Present Perfect
I have booted
you have booted
he/she/it has booted
we have booted
you have booted
they have booted
Past Continuous
I was booting
you were booting
he/she/it was booting
we were booting
you were booting
they were booting
Past Perfect
I had booted
you had booted
he/she/it had booted
we had booted
you had booted
they had booted
Future
I will boot
you will boot
he/she/it will boot
we will boot
you will boot
they will boot
Future Perfect
I will have booted
you will have booted
he/she/it will have booted
we will have booted
you will have booted
they will have booted
Future Continuous
I will be booting
you will be booting
he/she/it will be booting
we will be booting
you will be booting
they will be booting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been booting
you have been booting
he/she/it has been booting
we have been booting
you have been booting
they have been booting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been booting
you will have been booting
he/she/it will have been booting
we will have been booting
you will have been booting
they will have been booting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been booting
you had been booting
he/she/it had been booting
we had been booting
you had been booting
they had been booting
Conditional
I would boot
you would boot
he/she/it would boot
we would boot
you would boot
they would boot
Past Conditional
I would have booted
you would have booted
he/she/it would have booted
we would have booted
you would have booted
they would have booted

boot

(car) trunk
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.boot - footwear that covers the whole foot and lower legboot - footwear that covers the whole foot and lower leg
bootlace - a long lace for fastening boots
bootleg - the part of a boot above the instep
buskin, combat boot, desert boot, half boot, top boot - a boot reaching halfway up to the knee
shoe collar, collar - the stitching that forms the rim of a shoe or boot
heel counter, counter - a piece of leather forming the back of a shoe or boot; "a counter may be used to stiffen the material around the heel and to give support to the foot"
cowboy boot - a boot with a high arch and fancy stitching; worn by American cowboys
eyelet, eyehole - a small hole (usually round and finished around the edges) in cloth or leather for the passage of a cord or hook or bar
footgear, footwear - covering for a person's feet
heel - the bottom of a shoe or boot; the back part of a shoe or boot that touches the ground and provides elevation
hessian, Hessian boot, jackboot, Wellington boot, Wellington - (19th century) a man's high tasseled boot
hip boot, thigh boot - a very high boot; used especially for fishing
innersole, insole - the inner sole of a shoe or boot where the foot rests
instep - the part of a shoe or stocking that covers the arch of the foot
outsole - the outer sole of a shoe or boot that is the bottom of the shoe and makes contact with the ground
riding boot - a boot without laces that is worn for riding horses; part of a riding habit
gum boot, rubber boot - a high boot made of rubber
ski boot - a stiff boot that is fastened to a ski with a ski binding
gad, spur - a sharp prod fixed to a rider's heel and used to urge a horse onward; "cowboys know not to squat with their spurs on"
toe box - the forward tip of the upper of a shoe or boot that provides space and protection for the toes; "the toe box may be rounded or pointed"
toecap - a protective leather or steel cover for the toe of a boot or shoe, reinforcing or decorating it
tongue - the flap of material under the laces of a shoe or boot
upper - piece of leather or synthetic material that forms the part of a shoe or boot above the sole that encases the foot; "Uppers come in many styles"
2.boot - British term for the luggage compartment in a car
automobile trunk, luggage compartment, trunk - compartment in an automobile that carries luggage or shopping or tools; "he put his golf bag in the trunk"
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
3.boot - the swift release of a store of affective forceboot - the swift release of a store of affective force; "they got a great bang out of it"; "what a boot!"; "he got a quick rush from injecting heroin"; "he does it for kicks"
excitement, exhilaration - the feeling of lively and cheerful joy; "he could hardly conceal his excitement when she agreed"
4.boot - protective casing for something that resembles a leg
casing, shell, case - the housing or outer covering of something; "the clock has a walnut case"
5.boot - an instrument of torture that is used to heat or crush the foot and leg
instrument of torture - an instrument of punishment designed and used to inflict torture on the condemned person
6.boot - a form of foot torture in which the feet are encased in iron and slowly crushed
torturing, torture - the deliberate, systematic, or wanton infliction of physical or mental suffering by one or more persons in an attempt to force another person to yield information or to make a confession or for any other reason; "it required unnatural torturing to extract a confession"
7.boot - the act of delivering a blow with the footboot - the act of delivering a blow with the foot; "he gave the ball a powerful kick"; "the team's kicking was excellent"
goal-kick - (association football) a kick by the defending side after the attacking side sends the ball over the goal-line
goal-kick - (rugby) an attempt to kick a goal
punting, punt - (football) a kick in which the football is dropped from the hands and kicked before it touches the ground; "the punt traveled 50 yards"; "punting is an important part of the game"
place kick, place-kicking - (sports) a kick in which the ball is placed on the ground before kicking
dropkick - (football) kicking (as for a field goal) in which the football is dropped and kicked as it touches the ground
blow - a powerful stroke with the fist or a weapon; "a blow on the head"
Verb1.boot - kick; give a boot to
kick - strike with the foot; "The boy kicked the dog"; "Kick the door down"
boot out, drum out, oust, expel, kick out, throw out - remove from a position or office; "The chairman was ousted after he misappropriated funds"
2.boot - cause to load (an operating system) and start the initial processes; "boot your computer"
resuscitate, revive - cause to regain consciousness; "The doctors revived the comatose man"

boot

noun
1. wellington, welly, gumboot, wader, jackboot, overshoe, thigh boot, galosh He was wearing riding pants, high boots, and spurs.
verb
1. kick, punt, put the boot in(to) (slang), drop-kick One guy booted the door down.
boot someone out (Informal) dismiss, sack (informal), expel, throw out, oust, relegate, kick out, eject, kiss off (slang, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), show someone the door, give someone the boot (slang), give (someone) their marching orders, give someone the bullet (Brit. slang), give someone the bum's rush (slang), throw out on your ear (informal), give someone the heave or push (informal), give someone his or her P45 (informal) Schools are booting out record numbers of unruly pupils
boot something up (only used of computers) start up, prepare, fire up, make ready, reboot I can boot the machine up from a floppy disk, but that's all.
too big for your boots overconfident, arrogant, brash, cocky, presumptuous, bumptious, cocksure, hubristic, full of yourself The players have become too big for their boots.

boot 1

noun
1. Slang. The act of dismissing or the condition of being dismissed from employment:
Informal: ax.
Slang: bounce, sack.
2. Slang. The act of ejecting or the state of being ejected:
Slang: bounce.
3. Slang. A strong, pleasant feeling of excitement or stimulation:
Informal: wallop.
Slang: bang, high, kick.
verb
1. Slang. To end the employment or service of:
Informal: ax, fire, pink-slip.
Slang: bounce, can, sack.
Idioms: give someone his or her walking papers, give someone the ax, give someone the gate, give someone the pink slip, let go, show someone the door.
2. Slang. To put out by force.Also used with out:
Informal: chuck.
Slang: bounce, kick out.
Idioms: give someone the boot, give someone the heave-ho, send packing, show someone the door, throw out on one's ear.

boot 2

verb
Archaic. To be an advantage to:
Idiom: stand someone in good stead.
Translations
جَزْمَه، خِذاءحِذَاءٌ طَوِيلصُنْدوق سيارة للأمتِعَهيَرْفُس الكُره
botakopnoutkufr
støvlebagagerumsparke
saapas
čizmaprtljažnik
csizmakirúgmagasszárú cipőbakancs
bot
farangursgeymslaskór, stígvélsparkastígvél
ブーツ
장화
bagažinėbatasbūti išspirtam iš darboišspirtispirti
bagāžnieksiespertspertzābaks
čižmavykopnúť
škorenjprtljažnik
čizmaчизма
stövel
รองเท้าบูท
çizmetekme atmaktekme vurmakbagajbot
giày ống

boot

1 [buːt]
A. N
1.bota f; (= ankle boot) → borceguí m
to die with one's boots onmorir con las botas puestas
now the boot is on the other foot (Brit) → ahora se ha dado vuelta a la tortilla
to give sb the bootdespedir a algn, poner a algn en la calle
to get or be given the bootser despedido
he was quaking or shaking or trembling in his bootsle temblaban las piernas
to lick sb's bootshacer la pelotilla a algn
to put the boot in (Brit) → emplear la violencia (fig) → obrar decisivamente
see also big A6
2. (Brit) (Aut) → maletero m, baúl m (S. Cone), maletera f (Andes, Chile), cajuela f (Mex)
3. (US) (Aut) (also Denver boot) → cepo m
B. VT
1. (= kick) → dar un puntapié a
to boot sb outponer a algn de patitas en la calle
2. (Comput) (also boot up) → cebar, inicializar
C. VI (Comput) (also boot up) → cebar, inicializar
D. CPD boot boy N (Brit) → camorrista m
boot camp N (in army) → campamento m militar; (= prison) prisión civil con régimen militar
boot polish Nbetún m
boot sale N (Brit) (also car boot sale) → mercadillo m (en el que se exponen las mercancías en el maletero del coche)

boot

2 [buːt] to boot ADV (liter) → además, por añadidura

boot

[ˈbuːt]
n
(= heavy shoe) → botte f
to give sb the boot → flanquer qn dehors, virer qn
to get the boot, to be given the boot → être flanqué(e) à la porte, être viré(e)
to put the boot in (British)passer à l'attaque
[soldier, cowboy] → botte f
(for hiking)chaussure f de marche
(for football)chaussure f
football boots → chaussures fpl de foot
(= ankle boot) → bottine f
(British) [car] → coffre m
to boot (= in addition) → par-dessus le marché, en plus
vt (= kick) → botter
boot up
vi [computer] → démarrerboot camp n (US)camp m d'entraînement (pour nouvelles recrues)

boot

:
bootblack
nSchuhputzer m
boot boy
n (Brit inf) → Skinhead m
boot camp
n (US Mil inf) → Armee-Ausbildungslager nt
boot-cut jeans
plBoot-cut-Jeans pl

boot

:
bootjack
bootlace
nSchnürsenkel m; to pull oneself up by one’s (own) boots (inf)sich aus eigener Kraft hocharbeiten
bootleg
vt
(= make) liquorschwarzbrennen (inf); (= sell)schwarz verkaufen; (= transport)schmuggeln
(inf: = produce illegally) → schwarz herstellen; cassettes etcschwarz mitschneiden
adj whisky etcschwarzgebrannt; goodsschwarz hergestellt; cassettes etcschwarz mitgeschnitten
n (= product, cassette etc)Raubkopie f
bootlegger
nBootlegger m; (= seller also)Schwarzhändler m

boot

:
bootlicker
n (pej inf)Speichellecker m (pej inf)
bootmaker
nSchuhmacher m
boot polish
nSchuhcreme f

boot

1
n
Stiefel m; the boot is on the other foot (fig)es ist genau umgekehrt; to give somebody the (order of the (hum)) boot (inf)jdn rausschmeißen (inf), → jdn an die Luft setzen (inf); to get the boot (inf)rausgeschmissen werden (inf); it’s the boot for him (inf)der fliegt (inf); to die with one’s boots on (inf)über der Arbeit or in den Sielen sterben; to quake or shake or tremble in one’s bootsvor Angst fast umkommen; to put the boot in (Brit inf) → kräftig zutreten; (fig)zuschlagen; to put the boot into somebody/something (Brit fig inf) → jdn/etw niedermachen
(Brit, of car etc) → Kofferraum m
(inf: = kick) to give somebody/something a bootjdm/einer Sache einen Tritt geben or versetzen; he gave her the boot (fig)er hat mit ihr Schluss gemacht (inf)
(Brit, pej inf, = woman) → Schreckschraube f (inf)
vt
(inf: = kick) → einen (Fuß)tritt geben (+dat); ballkicken
(Comput) → starten, booten, hochfahren
vi (Comput) → starten, booten

boot

2
adv (hum, form) to bootobendrein, noch dazu

boot

1 [buːt]
1. n
a. (gen) → stivale m; (ankle boot) → stivaletto; (of soldier, skier, workman) → scarpone m; (for hiking) → scarpone m da montagna; (football boot) → scarpa
to give sb the boot (fam) → mettere qn alla porta
b. (Brit) (Aut) → portabagagli m inv, bagagliaio
2. vt
a. (fam) (kick) → dare un calcio a
to boot sb out → buttar fuori or cacciar via qn (a pedate)
b. (Comput) → inizializzare

boot

2 [buːt] n (old) (liter) to boot (in addition) → in (or per di) più, per giunta, come se non bastasse

boot

(buːt) noun
1. a covering for the foot and lower part of the leg, usually made of leather etc. a pair of suede boots.
2. (American trunk) a place for luggage in a motor-car etc.
verb
to kick. He booted the ball out of the goal.
give, get the boot
to dismiss (someone) or to be dismissed (usually from a job). He got the boot for always being late.

boot

حِذَاءٌ طَوِيل bota støvle Stiefel μπότα bota saapas botte čizma stivale ブーツ 장화 laars støvel kozak bota ботинок stövel รองเท้าบูท çizme giày ống 靴子

boot

n. bota especial, zapato o vendaje que cubre parte de la pierna y el pie.

boot

n bota; Unna — bota de Unna
References in classic literature ?
He did not say anything for a minute, but scratched his head and turned the snake over with his boot.
But her small boot heel did not make an indenture, not a mark upon the little glittering circlet.
I was watching to see where he kept his razor, when lo and behold, he takes the harpoon from the bed corner, slips out the long wooden stock, unsheathes the head, whets it a little on his boot, and striding up to the bit of mirror against the wall, begins a vigorous scraping, or rather harpooning of his cheeks.
But all in all, taking her from truck to helm, considering the dimensions of the cook's boilers, including his own live parchment boilers; fore and aft, I say, the Samuel Enderby was a jolly ship; of good fare and plenty; fine flip and strong; crack fellows all, and capital from boot heels to hat-band.
After one boot was fairly on, the senator sat with the other in his hand, profoundly studying the figure of the carpet.
This superintendent was a slim creature of thirty-five, with a sandy goatee and short sandy hair; he wore a stiff standing-collar whose upper edge almost reached his ears and whose sharp points curved forward abreast the corners of his mouth -- a fence that compelled a straight lookout ahead, and a turning of the whole body when a side view was required; his chin was propped on a spreading cravat which was as broad and as long as a bank-note, and had fringed ends; his boot toes were turned sharply up, in the fashion of the day, like sleigh- runners -- an effect patiently and laboriously produced by the young men by sitting with their toes pressed against a wall for hours together.
Well, when I catched that glimpse of that boot heel, the idea that went smashing through my head was, I know where he's hid the di'monds
Their backs had been made familiar with the bloody lash, so that they had become callous; mine was yet tender; for while at Baltimore I got few whip- pings, and few slaves could boast of a kinder master and mistress than myself; and the thought of pass- ing out of their hands into those of Master Andrew-- a man who, but a few days before, to give me a sample of his bloody disposition, took my little brother by the throat, threw him on the ground, and with the heel of his boot stamped upon his head till the blood gushed from his nose and ears--was well calculated to make me anxious as to my fate.
They did as they were desired; and by the time she judged it reasonable to have done with her boot, she had the comfort of farther delay in her power, being overtaken by a child from the cottage, setting out, according to orders, with her pitcher, to fetch broth from Hartfield.
He ground his teeth and was silent: he arrested his step and struck his boot against the hard ground.
He stood up and rested one hobnailed boot on the top of his spade while he looked her over.
After hailing the mom with this second salutation, he threw a boot at the woman as a third.