Bordeaux


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Bor·deaux 1

 (bôr-dō′)
A city of southwest France on the Garonne River. It was under English rule from 1154 to 1453 and was the seat of the French government in 1914 and again in 1940. Bordeaux is the trading center of a notable wine-producing region.

Bor·deaux 2

 (bôr-dō′)
n. pl. Bor·deaux (bôr-dō′, -dōz′)
A red or white wine produced in the region around Bordeaux, France.

Bordeaux

(bɔːˈdəʊ; French bɔrdo)
n
1. (Placename) a port in SW France, on the River Garonne: a major centre of the wine trade. Pop: 235 878 (2006)
2. (Brewing) any of several red, white, or rosé wines produced around Bordeaux

Bor•deaux

(bɔrˈdoʊ)

n., pl. -deaux (-ˈdoʊz)
1. a seaport in SW France, on the Garonne River. 226,281.
2. any of various wines produced in the region surrounding Bordeaux, esp. claret.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bordeaux - a port city in southwestern France; a major center of the wine trade
France, French Republic - a republic in western Europe; the largest country wholly in Europe
2.Bordeaux - any of several red or white wines produced around Bordeaux, France or wines resembling themBordeaux - any of several red or white wines produced around Bordeaux, France or wines resembling them
vino, wine - fermented juice (of grapes especially)
Medoc - red Bordeaux wine from the Medoc district of southwestern France
red Bordeaux, claret - dry red Bordeaux or Bordeaux-like wine
Translations

Bordeaux

[bɔːˈdəʊ] N
1. (Geog) → Burdeos m
2. (= wine) → burdeos m
References in classic literature ?
Hearing this, the captain vowed that they were the grateful parties (meaning himself and mate) and concluded by inviting Stubb down into his cabin to drink a bottle of Bordeaux.
His chair was opposite to the window, and he had taken his soup, and was raising his glass of Bordeaux to his lips, when he put it down.
I'd rather get an omelet, some cottage bread, and a chair here," he said, "than go to Cassan for sofas, truffles, and Bordeaux.
Consequently, observe what happens: the Duchesse de Langeais(see "History of the Thirteen") makes herself a nun for the lack of ten minutes' patience; Judge Popinot (see "Commission in Lunacy") puts off till the morrow the duty of examining the Marquis d'Espard; Charles Grandet (see "Eugenie Grandet") goes to Paris from Bordeaux instead of returning by Nantes; and such events are called chance or fatality
I am setting out for Bordeaux, and shall go to Bordeaux.
said Athos, emptying a glass of excellent Bordeaux wine which, without having at that period the reputation it now enjoys, merited it no less, "poor fools
Why, my dear boy, when a man has been proscribed by the mountaineers, has escaped from Paris in a hay-cart, been hunted over the plains of Bordeaux by Robespierre's bloodhounds, he becomes accustomed to most things.
At each corner were arranged trophies, presenting to view swords of all sorts, and on the walls hung four great pictures representing in their ordinary military costume the Cardinal de Lorraine, the Cardinal de Richelieu, the Cardinal de la Valette, and the Archbishop of Bordeaux.
I am thinking now of river ports I have seen - of Antwerp, for instance; of Nantes or Bordeaux, or even old Rouen, where the night-watchmen of ships, elbows on rail, gaze at shop-windows and brilliant cafes, and see the audience go in and come out of the opera-house.
He would relate with solemnity the next morning that a child of five years of age had lately died at Bordeaux, whose brain had been found to weigh sixty ounces--the brain of a Napoleon or a Washington
It seemed funny that I should ask his leave, as he was only a few years older than me; but I didn't want to do anything on the sly, so I wrote to father at Bordeaux, where the company has its French offices, but the letter came back to me on the very morning of the wedding.
My wines of Anjou, selected for Athos, who liked them formerly; my wines of Burgundy, Champagne, Bordeaux, and Spain, stocking eight cellars and twelve vaults, in my various houses.