bore


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Related to bore: tidal bore, bore witness

bore 1

 (bôr)
v. bored, bor·ing, bores
v.tr.
1. To make a hole in or through, with or as if with a drill.
2. To form (a tunnel, for example) by drilling, digging, or burrowing.
v.intr.
1. To make a hole in or through something with or as if with a drill: "three types of protein that enable the cells to bore in and out of blood vessels" (Elisabeth Rosenthal).
2. To proceed or advance steadily or laboriously: a destroyer boring through heavy seas.
n.
1. A hole or passage made by or as if by use of a drill.
2. A hollow, usually cylindrical chamber or barrel, as of a firearm.
3. The interior diameter of a hole, tube, or cylinder.
4. The caliber of a firearm.
5. A drilling tool.

[Middle English boren, from Old English borian.]

bore 2

 (bôr)
tr.v. bored, bor·ing, bores
To make weary by being dull, repetitive, or tedious: The movie bored us.
n.
One that is wearingly dull, repetitive, or tedious.

[Origin unknown.]
Usage Note: If an activity or experience starts to bore you, are you bored by it, bored of it, or bored with it? All three constructions are common in informal writing and speech, but they enjoy different degrees of acceptance. The most widely approved wordings are bored with and bored by. In our 2012 survey, the sentences I'm getting bored with this lecture series and I'm getting bored by this lecture series were accepted by 93 percent and 88 percent of our Usage Panel, respectively. By contrast, only 24 percent of the Panelists found I'm getting bored of this lecture series at least somewhat acceptable. Why is the bored of construction so widely condemned, when tired of, on which it is presumably modeled, is universally accepted? Probably because tired of was grandfathered into our language, as a relic of the once-common use of of in passive-voice constructions (in Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing, for instance, Benedict describes himself as being "loved of all ladies"—that is, loved by them). By the time bore came into English in the late 1800s, the use of of to indicate the agent in passive constructions was uncommon. People have kept using such pre-existent familiar phrasings as tired of and frightened of, but otherwise the passive-agent use of of is mostly defunct, so the phrasing bored of is likely to seem like an error to many readers.

bore 3

 (bôr)
n.
A high, often dangerous wave caused by the surge of a flood tide upstream in a narrowing estuary or by colliding tidal currents. Also called eagre.

[Middle English bare, wave, from Old Norse bāra; see bher- in Indo-European roots.]

bore 4

 (bôr)
v.
Past tense of bear1.

bore

(bɔː)
vb
1. (Mechanical Engineering) to produce (a hole) in (a material) by use of a drill, auger, or other cutting tool
2. (Mechanical Engineering) to increase the diameter of (a hole), as by an internal turning operation on a lathe or similar machine
3. (tr) to produce (a hole in the ground, tunnel, mine shaft, etc) by digging, drilling, cutting, etc
4. (Individual Sports, other than specified) (intr) informal (of a horse or athlete in a race) to push other competitors, esp in order to try to get them out of the way
n
5. a hole or tunnel in the ground, esp one drilled in search of minerals, oil, etc
6. (Mechanical Engineering)
a. a circular hole in a material produced by drilling, turning, or drawing
b. the diameter of such a hole
7. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery)
a. the hollow part of a tube or cylinder, esp of a gun barrel
b. the diameter of such a hollow part; calibre
8. Austral an artesian well
[Old English borian; related to Old Norse bora, Old High German borōn to bore, Latin forāre to pierce, Greek pharos ploughing, phárunx pharynx]

bore

(bɔː)
vb
(tr) to tire or make weary by being dull, repetitious, or uninteresting
n
a dull, repetitious, or uninteresting person, activity, or state
[C18: of unknown origin]
bored adj

bore

(bɔː)
n
(Physical Geography) a high steep-fronted wave moving up a narrow estuary, caused by the tide
[C17: from Old Norse bāra wave, billow]

bore

(bɔː)
vb
the past tense of bear1

bore1

(bɔr, boʊr)

v. bored, bor•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to pierce (a solid substance) with some rotary cutting instrument.
2. to make (a hole) with such an instrument.
3. to make (a tunnel, mine, passage, etc.) by hollowing out, cutting through, or removing a core of material.
4. to enlarge (a hole) to a precise diameter with a cutting tool within the hole, by rotating either the tool or the work.
5. to force (an opening), as through a crowd, by persistent forward thrusting (usu. fol. by through or into).
v.i.
6. to make a hole in a solid substance with a rotary cutting instrument.
n.
7. a hole made or enlarged by boring.
8. the inside diameter of a hole or hollow cylindrical object, such as an engine cylinder or a gun barrel.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English borian]

bore2

(bɔr, boʊr)

v. bored, bor•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to weary by dullness, repetition, unwelcome attentions, etc.: The long speech bored me.
n.
2. a dull, tiresome, or uncongenial person.
3. a cause of ennui or petty annoyance: The play was a bore.
[1760–70; of uncertain orig.]

bore3

(bɔr, boʊr)

n.
an abrupt rise of tidal water moving inland from the mouth of an estuary.
[1275–1325; Middle English bare < Old Norse bāra wave]

bore4

(bɔr, boʊr)

v. pt. of bear 1.

bore

1. 'bore'

Bore is a verb, and it is also the past tense of the verb bear.

See bear

If something or someone bores you, you don't find them interesting.

Life in the countryside bores me.
They used to enjoy his company, but now he bored them.
2. 'bored'

You can say that you are bored with something or someone.

Tom was bored with the film.

If you have nothing to do, you can say that you are bored.

Many children get bored during the summer holidays.
3. 'boring'

Don't confuse bored with boring. If you say that someone or something is boring, you mean that they bore you.

It's a very boring job.
He's a kind man, but he's a bit boring.

bore


Past participle: bored
Gerund: boring

Imperative
bore
bore
Present
I bore
you bore
he/she/it bores
we bore
you bore
they bore
Preterite
I bored
you bored
he/she/it bored
we bored
you bored
they bored
Present Continuous
I am boring
you are boring
he/she/it is boring
we are boring
you are boring
they are boring
Present Perfect
I have bored
you have bored
he/she/it has bored
we have bored
you have bored
they have bored
Past Continuous
I was boring
you were boring
he/she/it was boring
we were boring
you were boring
they were boring
Past Perfect
I had bored
you had bored
he/she/it had bored
we had bored
you had bored
they had bored
Future
I will bore
you will bore
he/she/it will bore
we will bore
you will bore
they will bore
Future Perfect
I will have bored
you will have bored
he/she/it will have bored
we will have bored
you will have bored
they will have bored
Future Continuous
I will be boring
you will be boring
he/she/it will be boring
we will be boring
you will be boring
they will be boring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been boring
you have been boring
he/she/it has been boring
we have been boring
you have been boring
they have been boring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been boring
you will have been boring
he/she/it will have been boring
we will have been boring
you will have been boring
they will have been boring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been boring
you had been boring
he/she/it had been boring
we had been boring
you had been boring
they had been boring
Conditional
I would bore
you would bore
he/she/it would bore
we would bore
you would bore
they would bore
Past Conditional
I would have bored
you would have bored
he/she/it would have bored
we would have bored
you would have bored
they would have bored
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bore - a person who evokes boredombore - a person who evokes boredom    
disagreeable person, unpleasant person - a person who is not pleasant or agreeable
gasbag, windbag - a boring person who talks a great deal about uninteresting topics
nudnick, nudnik - (Yiddish) someone who is a boring pest
platitudinarian - a bore who makes excessive use of platitudes
stuffed shirt - a bore who is extremely formal, pompous, and old-fashioned
2.bore - a high wave (often dangerous) caused by tidal flow (as by colliding tidal currents or in a narrow estuary)bore - a high wave (often dangerous) caused by tidal flow (as by colliding tidal currents or in a narrow estuary)
tidal current, tidal flow - the water current caused by the tides
3.bore - diameter of a tube or gun barrel
diam, diameter - the length of a straight line passing through the center of a circle and connecting two points on the circumference
4.bore - a hole or passage made by a drillbore - a hole or passage made by a drill; usually made for exploratory purposes
mining, excavation - the act of extracting ores or coal etc from the earth
excavation - a hole in the ground made by excavating
shot hole - drill hole for a charge of an explosive
Verb1.bore - cause to be bored
interest - excite the curiosity of; engage the interest of
2.bore - make a hole, especially with a pointed power or hand tool; "don't drill here, there's a gas pipe"; "drill a hole into the wall"; "drill for oil"; "carpenter bees are boring holes into the wall"
spud - initiate drilling operations, as for petroleum; "The well was spudded in April"
counter-drill - drill in an opposite direction
trepan - cut a hole with a trepan, as in surgery
cut - separate with or as if with an instrument; "Cut the rope"

bore

1
verb
1. drill, mine, sink, tunnel, pierce, penetrate, burrow, puncture, perforate, gouge out Get the special drill bit to bore the correct-size hole.
noun
1. hole, tunnel, shaft, borehole, drill hole Water is pumped out to reduce pressure around the well bore.

bore

2
verb
1. tire, exhaust, annoy, fatigue, weary, wear out, jade, wear down, be tedious, pall on, send to sleep Dickie bored him all through the meal with stories of the Navy.
tire interest, excite, fascinate, stimulate, amuse, divert, hold the attention of, engross
noun
1. nuisance, pain (informal), drag (informal), headache (informal), yawn (informal), anorak (informal), pain in the neck (informal), dullard, pain in the arse (taboo informal), dull person, tiresome person, wearisome talker He's a bore and a fool.
Quotations
"Bore: a person who talks when you wish him to listen" [Ambrose Bierce The Devil's Dictionary]
"The way to be a bore is to say everything" [Voltaire Sept Discours en vers sur l'Homme]
"A bore is a man who, when you ask him how he is, tells you" [Bert Leston Taylor The So-Called Human Race]
"A healthy male adult bore consumes each year one and a half times his own weight in other people's patience" [John Updike Confessions of a Wild Bore]
"Some people can stay longer in an hour than others can in a week" [W.D. Howells]

bore

verb
To fatigue with dullness or tedium:
noun
An unpleasant, tiresome person:
Slang: drip, dweeb, jerk, nerd, pill, poop.
Translations
ثَقْبٌشَخْصٌ مُمِلٌّقُطْرُ ماسورةِ البُنْدُقِيَّهيُضْجِرُيـُمْلِل على
nuditnudit/vyděsit k smrtinudný člověkotravovatprovrtat
kedekede livet af sigboredødbiderkaliber
ikävystyttääporata
dosađivatidosaditi
halálra untat
borabora, grafaborvídddrepa úr leiîindum; gera dauîhræddanleiîindaskjóîa
穴をあける
구멍을 뚫다
apnicīga nodarbošanāsapniktgarlaicīgs cilvēksgarlaikotkalibrs
nudiťotravný človek
dolgočasitivrtati
tråka ut
ทำให้เบื่อ
baş belâsıcan sıkıcı kimsecan sıkmakcanını sıkmakçap
làm cho chán

bore

1 [bɔːʳ]
A. N
1. (= tool) → taladro m, barrena f (Geol) → sonda f
2. (also bore hole) → perforación f
3. (= diameter) → agujero m, barreno m; [of gun] → calibre m; [of cylinder] → alesaje m
a 12-bore shotgununa escopeta del calibre 12
B. VT [+ hole, tunnel] → hacer, perforar
to bore a hole inhacer or perforar un agujero en
to bore one's way throughabrirse camino por
wood bored by insectsmadera f carcomida
C. VI to bore for oilhacer perforaciones en busca de petróleo

bore

2 [bɔːʳ]
A. N
1. (= person) → pesado/a m/f, pelmazo/a m/f
what a bore he is!¡qué hombre más pesado!, ¡es más pesado que el plomo!
2. (= event, task) → lata f
it's such a borees una lata, es un rollo (Sp)
what a bore!¡qué lata!, ¡qué rollo! (Sp)
B. VTaburrir
to be bored; get boredaburrirse
he's bored to death or tears; he's bored stiffestá aburrido como una ostra, está muerto de aburrimiento
to be bored withestar aburrido or harto de

bore

4 [bɔːʳ] N (= tidal wave) → marea f

bore

[ˈbɔːr]
pt of bear
vt
[+ hole] → percer; [+ tunnel] → creuser
[+ person] → ennuyer
it bores me to tears, it bores me stiff, it bores me to death → cela m'ennuie à mourir
n
(= person) → raseur/euse m/f
(= thing) to be a bore → être ennuyeux/euse
It's a bore → C'est vraiment ennuyeux.
[gun] → calibre m
12-bore shotgun → fusil de calibre 12

bore

1
vt hole, well, tunnelbohren; rockdurchbohren
vibohren (for nach)
n (of shotgun, cannon)Kaliber nt; a 12 bore shotguneine Flinte vom Kaliber 12

bore

2
n
(= person)Langweiler m; what a bore he is!das ist ein Langweiler!, der kann einen langweilen or anöden (inf); the club/office boreder Langweiler vom Dienst
(= thing, profession, situation etc) to be a borelangweilig sein
(= nuisance) don’t be a borenun sei doch nicht so (schwierig)!; he’s a bore, he never wants …er ist eine Plage, er will nie; it’s such a bore having to goes ist wirklich zu dumm or lästig, dass ich etc gehen muss; oh what a bore!das ist aber auch zu dumm or lästig!
vtlangweilen; to bore somebody stiff or to death or to tears, to bore the pants off somebody (inf)jdn zu Tode langweilen; to be/get boredsich langweilen; I’m boredmir ist es langweilig, ich langweile mich; he is bored with his job/herseine Arbeit/sie langweilt ihn; he was bored with reading/lifeer war des Lesens/Lebens überdrüssig (geh), → er hatte das Lesen/Leben über

bore

4
n (= tidal wave)Flutwelle f

bore

1 [bɔːʳ]
1. n (person) → noioso/a, seccatore/trice, noia; (event) → noia, barba
the party/office bore → l'attaccabottoni m/f inv (di una festa/un ufficio)
2. vt (person) → annoiare

bore

2 [bɔːʳ]
1. n (also bore hole) → foro di sonda; (diameter) → diametro interno; (of gun) → calibro
a 12-bore shotgun → un fucile calibro 12
2. vt (hole) → praticare; (tunnel) → scavare
3. vi to bore forperforare or trivellare alla ricerca di

bore1

(boː) verb
to make (a hole etc in something). They bored a tunnel under the sea.
noun
the size of the hollow barrel of a gun.
ˈborehole noun
a hole made by boring, especially to find oil etc.

bore2

(boː) verb
to make (someone) feel tired and uninterested, by being dull etc. He bores everyone with stories about his travels.
noun
a dull, boring person or thing.
ˈboredom noun
the state of being bored.
ˈboring adjective
a boring job; This book is boring.

bore

يـُمْلِل على nudit kede langweilen προκαλώ ανία aburrir ikävystyttää ennuyer dosađivati annoiare 穴をあける 구멍을 뚫다 vervelen bore zanudzić aborrecer, entediar докучать tråka ut ทำให้เบื่อ canını sıkmak làm cho chán 烦扰

bore

vt aburrir

bore

pret de bear
References in classic literature ?
It was wonderful to see how well the aged Indian bore up in spite of his years, and walked on ahead.
And all along it, wherever it looped or ran, the sunflowers grew; some of them were as big as little trees, with great rough leaves and many branches which bore dozens of blossoms.
The picture completed bore no resemblance to Madame Ratignolle.