bork

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bork

(bɔːk)
vb (tr)
1. to incorrectly configure a device, esp a computer
2. to cause damage to
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) jocular US to disrespect or vilify, esp in order to obstruct a person's appointment to public office

bork

(bɔrk)
v.t.
to attack (a candidate or public figure) systematically, esp. in the media.
[1988, Amer.; after Judge Robert H. Bork, whose appointment to the Supreme Court was blocked in 1987 after an extensive media campaign by his opponents]
References in periodicals archive ?
We shall let you humans live, so long as you can provide us with food that borks good.
Well, I don't want to disillusion you guys, but we're not big on bork these days.
No, no, no, I mean, you and me, we agree on this bork thing, OK?
Species that do not like bork do not deserve to live.
we found this tiny dark-colored round food with a white substance inside it, and it was the most bork of all.
Those of you who do not like bork - and you know who you are - there is still time to reform.
Once the mirage of Borks as an ardent guardian of the First Amendment is dispelled, the pattern underlying his position on various constitutional issues emerges with harsh clarity.
Supporters of Supreme Court nominee Robert Bork are making a concerted effort to portray him as an open-minded moderate.
When the American Bar Association Journal ran an item about my article under the memorable title "Here Comes Attila the Hun of the Constitution,' Bork responded angrily.
Journal exchange was in progress, the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, on which Bork sits, heard arguments in Ollman v.
It would be ungenerous to dismiss the Ollman opinion as merely an attempt by Bork to counter the image of himself-- broadcast to 340,000 lawyers by the official publication of the organized bar--as a menace to the free speech tradition.
Journal, Bork stated that he no longer takes the view that First Amendment protection is limited to political speech: "I have long since concluded that many other forms of discourse, such as moral and scientific debate, are central to democratic government and deserve protection.