borne


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Related to borne: ceaselessly

borne

 (bôrn)
v.
A past participle of bear1.
adj.
1. Carried or transported by. Often used in combination: current-borne plankton.
2. Transmitted by. Often used in combination: mosquito-borne diseases.

borne

(bɔːn)
vb
1. for all active uses of the verb, the past participle of bear1
2. for all passive uses of the verb except sense 4 unless followed by by, the past participle of bear1
3. be borne in on be borne in upon (of a fact) to be realized by (someone): it was borne in on us how close we had been to disaster.

bear1

(bɛər)

v. bore, borne born, bear•ing. v.t.
1. to hold up or support: The columns bear the weight of the roof.
2. to give birth to: to bear a child.
3. to produce by natural growth: a tree that bears fruit.
4. to sustain or be capable of: This claim doesn't bear close examination. The view bears comparison with the loveliest sights.
5. to drive or push: The crowd was borne back by the police.
6. to carry or conduct (oneself, one's body, etc.): to bear oneself bravely.
7. to suffer; endure or tolerate: He bore the blame. I can't bear your nagging.
8. to warrant or be worthy of: It doesn't bear repeating.
9. to carry; bring: to bear gifts.
10. to carry in the mind or heart: to bear malice.
11. to transmit or spread (gossip, tales, etc.).
12. to render; afford; give: to bear testimony.
13. to have and be entitled to: to bear title.
14. to exhibit; show: to bear a resemblance.
15. to accept or have as an obligation: to bear the cost.
16. to possess as a quality or characteristic; have in or on: to bear traces; to bear an inscription.
v.i.
17. to tend in a course or direction; move; go: to bear left.
18. to be situated: The lighthouse bears due north.
19. to bring forth young, fruit, etc.
20. bear down,
a. to press or weigh down.
b. to strive harder.
21. bear down on,
a. to press or weigh down on.
b. to strive toward.
c. to move toward rapidly and threateningly.
22. bear on or upon, to be relevant to; affect.
23. bear out, to substantiate; confirm.
24. bear up, to face hardship bravely; endure.
25. bear with, to be patient with.
Idioms:
bring to bear , to force to have an impact: to bring pressure to bear on union members to end a strike.
[before 900; Middle English beren, Old English beran, c. Old High German beran, Old Norse bera, Gothic bairan to carry, Skt bhárati (one) carries, Latin ferre, Greek phérein to carry]
syn: bear, stand, endure refer to supporting the burden of something distressing, irksome, or painful. bear is the general word and suggests merely being able to put up with something: She is bearing the disappointment quite well. stand is an informal equivalent, but with an implication of stout spirit: I couldn't stand the pain. endure implies continued resistance and patience over a long period of time: to endure torture.
usage: Since the latter part of the 18th century, a distinction has been made between born and borne as past participles of the verb bear. borne is the past participle in all senses that do not refer to physical birth: The wheat fields have borne abundantly. Judges have always borne a burden of responsibility. borne is also the participle when the sense is “to bring forth (young)” and the focus is on the mother rather than on the child. In such cases, borne is preceded by a form of have or followed by by: She had borne a son the previous year. Two children borne by her earlier were already grown. When the focus is on the offspring or on something brought forth as if by birth, born is the standard spelling, and it occurs in passive constructions and in adjective phrases: My friend was born in Ohio. No children have been born at the South Pole. Abraham Lincoln, born in Kentucky, grew up in Illinois.

bear2

(bɛər)

n., pl. bears, (esp. collectively) bear, n.
1. any large, stocky, omnivorous mammal of the carnivore family Ursidae, with thick, coarse fur, a very short tail, and a plantigrade gait, inhabiting the Northern Hemisphere and N South America.
2. a gruff, clumsy, or rude person.
3. a person who believes that stock prices will decline (opposed to bull).
4. (cap.) either of two constellations, Ursa Major or Ursa Minor.
adj.
5. marked by declining prices, esp. of stocks: a bear market.
[before 1000; Middle English be(a)re, beor(e), Old English bera, c. Old High German bero; Germanic *beran- literally, the brown one]
bear′like`, adj.
Translations
gedragenondersteund

borne

a. acarreado-a; transmitido-a; llevado-a.

borne

pp de bear
References in classic literature ?
I don't care if Hugo does come at me with a pistol," returned Amy, who was not gifted with dramatic power, but was chosen because she was small enough to be borne out shrieking by the villain of the piece.
In her girlhood and before her marriage with Tom Willard, Elizabeth had borne a somewhat shaky rep- utation in Winesburg.
Sailing across the bay to the Cheniere Caminada, Edna felt as if she were being borne away from some anchorage which had held her fast, whose chains had been loosening--had snapped the night before when the mystic spirit was abroad, leaving her free to drift whithersoever she chose to set her sails.