borscht belt


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borscht belt

or Borscht Belt
n. Informal
The predominantly Jewish resort hotels of the Catskill Mountains. Also called borscht circuit.

[From the popularity of borscht, in the cuisine of these hotels.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.borscht belt - (informal) a resort area in the Catskill Mountains of New York that was patronized primarily by Jewish guests; "many comedians learned their trade playing the borscht circuit"
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
playground, resort area, vacation spot - an area where many people go for recreation
Catskill Mountains, Catskills - a range of the Appalachians to the west of the Hudson in southeastern New York; includes many popular resort areas
References in periodicals archive ?
This work interweaves the story of Jewish comedy with Jewish history, from the Talmud and medieval skits to the Borscht Belt and Adam Sandler.
She also smiled at a picture of the Concord Hotel in the Borscht Belt circuit, where she had worked.
And, as Nahshon points out, it served as a training ground for the Borscht Belt, which would, in turn, shape American comic sensibilities for half a century.
Tuxedo-clad comics along the Borscht Belt were still stealing jokes from one another when Sahl, clad in a V-neck sweater and grasping a newspaper, began his revolution at the Hungry i in San Francisco.
THOUGH HE HAD TO LEARN THE language by rote, Joel Grey borrowed heavily from that child of the Yiddish theatre, the Borscht Belt circuit.
According to Timberman, that's another role he plays on set: "Adam is a killer joke-teller," she said, "even if his repertoire is of the Borscht Belt variety.
During the 1950s, the Borscht Belt was a hotbed of Jewish comedy.
Citing examples from Heinrich Heine, Sholem Aleichem, Borscht Belt, and other literary and pop culture influences, she analyzes the functions of Jewish/Yiddish humor in addressing the anxieties of Jewish life, from insider jokes in the East European shtlel to comedy popular with general American audiences.
Which reminds me of something else funny, the kind of Borscht Belt joke they tell at an off-Broadway show now playing in New York, called "Old Jews Telling Jokes.
lures readers into [a] satiric tale of smothering mothers, neurotic daughters and intense sibling rivalry through famous cinematic images and Borscht Belt humor,” it also “moves them through keenly observed characters and their emotional journey toward selfhood,” says author Susan Applebaum.
Every time I look at the existing IAAF policy, the old Borscht Belt joke comes to mind: "The food is so bad, and the portions are so small
The United States is represented by Joshua Cohen, whose Witz bears comparison, in both scope and accomplishment, to David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest--though with a bit of the Borscht Belt mixed in.