botanical


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bo·tan·i·cal

 (bə-tăn′ĭ-kəl) also bo·tan·ic (-tăn′ĭk)
adj.
1. Of or relating to plants or plant life.
2. Of or relating to the science of botany.
n.
A drug, medicinal preparation, or similar substance obtained from a plant or plants.

[From Late Latin botanicus, from Greek botanikos, from botanē, fodder, plants.]

bo·tan′i·cal·ly adv.

botanical

(ˌbəˈtænɪkəl) or

botanic

adj
(Botany) of or relating to botany or plants
n
(Pharmacology) any drug or pesticide that is made from parts of a plant
[C17: from Medieval Latin botanicus, from Greek botanikos relating to plants, from botanē plant, pasture, from boskein to feed; perhaps related to Latin bōs ox, cow]
boˈtanically adv

bo•tan•i•cal

(bəˈtæn ɪ kəl)

adj. Also, bo•tan′ic.
1. of, pertaining to, or derived from plants.
2. of or pertaining to botany: botanical research.
3. of or belonging to a plant species.
n.
4. a drug made from part of a plant, as from roots or bark.
[1650–60; < Medieval Latin botanicus < Greek botanikós of plants, derivative of botánē herb]
bo•tan′i•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.botanical - a drug made from part of a plant (as the bark or root or leaves)
drug - a substance that is used as a medicine or narcotic
Adj.1.botanical - of or relating to plants or botany; "botanical garden"
Translations
kasvitieteellinen

botanical

[bəˈtænɪkəl] ADJ [gardens] → botánico

botanical

[bəˈtænɪkəl] adjbotanique

botanical

[bəˈtænɪk/əl] botanic [bəˈtænɪk] adjbotanico/a

botanical

adj botánico; n medicina de origen botánico, planta medicinal
References in classic literature ?
Also, how the Doctor's cogitating manner was attributable to his being always engaged in looking out for Greek roots; which, in my innocence and ignorance, I supposed to be a botanical furor on the Doctor's part, especially as he always looked at the ground when he walked about, until I understood that they were roots of words, with a view to a new Dictionary which he had in contemplation.
Meanwhile I was occupying myself in classifying my mineralogical, botanical, and zoological riches, when the accident happened to the Scotia.
Linum Usitatissimum = Linum usitatissimum (Cooper's capitalization varies) is the botanical name for the variety of flax from which linen is made}
Bradbury, in the course of his botanical researches, found a surprising number in a half torpid state, under flat stones upon the banks which overhung the cantonment, and narrowly escaped being struck by a rattlesnake, which darted at him from a cleft in the rock, but fortunately gave him warning by his rattle.
A tin box for botanical specimens hung over his shoulder and he carried a green butterfly-net in one of his hands.
Being the professor's sole companion in his botanical excursions, I almost forgot that I had ever been afloat, and became quite learned.
Each could call himself expert in his own province, and more than one rare botanical specimen, that to science was as great a victory won as the conquest of a pair of ivory tusks, became the doctor's booty.
After spending a week in Cape Town, finding that they overcharged me at the hotel, and having seen everything there was to see, including the botanical gardens, which seem to me likely to confer a great benefit on the country, and the new Houses of Parliament, which I expect will do nothing of the sort, I determined to go back to Natal by the /Dunkeld/, then lying at the docks waiting for the /Edinburgh Castle/ due in from England.
It was very little, but enough to make him appear to her a Porson or Bentley, and to put him at his ease with botanical nomenclature.
But in vain did he search the whole room, open and shut all the drawers, even that privileged one where the parcel which had been so fatal to Cornelius had been deposited; he found ticketed, as in a botanical garden, the "Jane," the "John de Witt," the hazel-nut, and the roasted-coffee coloured tulip; but of the black tulip, or rather the seedling bulbs within which it was still sleeping, not a trace was found.
Just as he left off, the maiden woke up, rubbed her eyes, got off the bank, and had a dance all alone too--such a dance that the savage looked on in ecstasy all the while, and when it was done, plucked from a neighbouring tree some botanical curiosity, resembling a small pickled cabbage, and offered it to the maiden, who at first wouldn't have it, but on the savage shedding tears relented.
In botanical works, this or that plant is stated to be ill adapted for wide dissemination; but for transport across the sea, the greater or less facilities may be said to be almost wholly unknown.