botany


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

bot·a·ny

 (bŏt′n-ē)
n. pl. bot·a·nies
1.
a. The science or study of plants.
b. A book or scholarly work on this subject.
2. The plant life of a particular area: the botany of the Ohio River valley.
3. The characteristic features and biology of a particular kind of plant or plant group.

[Back-formation from earlier botanic, botanical, from Late Latin botanicus; see botanical.]

botany

(ˈbɒtənɪ)
n, pl -nies
1. (Botany) the study of plants, including their classification, structure, physiology, ecology, and economic importance
2. (Botany) the plant life of a particular region or time
3. (Botany) the biological characteristics of a particular group of plants
[C17: from botanical; compare astronomy, astronomical]
ˈbotanist n

bot•a•ny

(ˈbɒt n i)

n., pl. -nies.
1. the science of plants; the branch of biology that deals with plant life.
2. the plant life of a region.
3. the biological characteristics of a plant or plant group.
[1690–1700]

bot·a·ny

(bŏt′n-ē)
1. The scientific study of plants, including their growth, structure, and diseases.
2. The plant life of a particular area: the botany of the American southwest.

Botany


the branch of systematic botany that studies grasses. Also called graminology.agrostologist, n. — agrostologic, agrostological, adj.
the branch of botany that studies seaweeds and algae. Also called phycology. — algologist, n.algological, adj.
the branch of botany that studies the cultivation of grapes. — ampelographer, n.
an abnormal change in the form of a plant that falsely gives it the appearance of a different species. — anamorphic, adj.
the state or condition of certain flowers or plants of having different dimensions along different axes. See also physics. — anisotropic, adj.
the branch of botany that studies brambles. — batologist, n.
in botany, the condition of having two planes of symmetry at right angles to one another. — bisymmetric, bisymmetrical, adj.
a major division of biology that studies all plant life. Also called phytology.botanist, n.botanical, adj.
the branch of botany that studies mosses and liverworts. — bryologist, n.
the pollination process of figs, in which fig wasps, attracted by the caprifigs, or inedible fig-fruit, pollinate the figs. — caprificator, n.
a person who specializes in the study of sedges.
the branch of botany that studies the structure of fruits and seeds. — carpologist, n.carpological, adj.
abnormal coloration in parts of a plant that are usually green. See also color.
one proficient in cryptogamic botany, i.e., the study of plants, as ferns and mosses, that have no true flowers or seeds.
the branch of botany that studies trees. — dendrologist, n.dendrologic, dendrological, adj.
the study of the character, ecology, and causes of plant diseases, as blight, which destroy a large number of susceptible plants in a large area simultaneously. — epiphytologist, n.
a specialty in botany that studies the lore and uses of plants as illustrative of the customs of a (usually primitive) society. — ethnobotanist, n.ethnobotanic, ethnobotanical, adj.
the study of ferns. Cf. pteridology.filicologist. n.
the scientific study of fungi. — fungologist, n.fungological, adj.
agrostology. — graminologist, n.graminologic, graminological, adj.
Obsolete, a descriptive botanist. See also plants.
Obsolete, a herbalist.
Obsolete, botany.
a collection of dried plants, assembled and arranged for botanical study.
the study of lichens. — lichenologist, n.lichenologic, lichenological, adj.
a system of botanical nomenclature following the binomial procedures established by Swedish botanist Carl von Linné. — Linnaean, Linnean, adj.
the study of mosses. — muscologist, n.
1. the branch of botany that studies fungi.
2. a catalogue of the fungi found in a specific area. — mycologist, n.mycologie, mycological, adj.
the branch of botany or horticulture that studies orchids. — orchidologist, n.
a scientific description of seaweed. — phycographic, adj.
algology. — phycologist, n.
any of the basic divisions of the plant or animal kingdom. Cf. phylon.
the science and history of the development of plants. Also phytogeny. — phytogenetic, phytogenetical, adj.
the study of plants according to their geographical distribution. — phytogeographer, n.phytogeographic, phytogeographical, adj.
the branch of botany that studies plant measurement and plant taxonomy. — phytographer, phytographist, n.phytographic, phytographical, adj.
botany.
the branch of ecology that studies the interrelations of plants and plant communities. — phytosociologist, n.phytosociologic, phytosociological. adj.
1. the branch of botany that studies the cultivation of fruit.
2. the science of growing, storing, and processing fruit. — pomologist, n.
the systematic description of ferns.
the branch of botany that studies ferns. Cf. filicology. — pteridologist, n.
the theory that lichens are parasitic fungi growing upon algae, first advanced by the German botanist S. Schwendener.
the study of the sphagnum mosses. — sphagnologist, n.
selective breeding to develop strains with particular characteristics. — stirpicultural, adj.
production by union of elements that were formerly separate. — symphyogenetic, adj.
a botanical or zoological name in which two terms are combined, the generic name and the specific, with both being the same. (a practice no longer approved by the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature.)
a branch of mycology that studies rusts. — uredinologist, n.

botany

Study of plants.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.botany - all the plant life in a particular region or periodbotany - all the plant life in a particular region or period; "Pleistocene vegetation"; "the flora of southern California"; "the botany of China"
plant life, flora, plant - (botany) a living organism lacking the power of locomotion
aggregation, collection, accumulation, assemblage - several things grouped together or considered as a whole
biota, biology - all the plant and animal life of a particular region
browse - vegetation (such as young shoots, twigs, and leaves) that is suitable for animals to eat; "a deer needs to eat twenty pounds of browse every day"
brush, coppice, copse, thicket, brushwood - a dense growth of bushes
growth - vegetation that has grown; "a growth of trees"; "the only growth was some salt grass"
chaparral, scrub, bush - dense vegetation consisting of stunted trees or bushes
stand - a growth of similar plants (usually trees) in a particular area; "they cut down a stand of trees"
forest, woods, wood - the trees and other plants in a large densely wooded area
shrubbery - a collection of shrubs growing together
garden - the flowers or vegetables or fruits or herbs that are cultivated in a garden
brier, brier patch, brierpatch - tangled mass of prickly plants
ground cover, groundcover - low-growing plants planted in deep shade or on a steep slope where turf is difficult to grow
mown, cut - (used of grass or vegetation) cut down with a hand implement or machine; "the smell of newly mown hay"
unmown, uncut - (used of grass or vegetation) not cut down with a hand implement or machine; "uncut grass"; "an unmown lawn"
2.botany - the branch of biology that studies plantsbotany - the branch of biology that studies plants
plant life, flora, plant - (botany) a living organism lacking the power of locomotion
etiolation - (botany) the act of causing a plant to develop without chlorophyll by growing it without exposure to sunlight; "the etiolation of celery"
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
mycology - the branch of botany that studies fungi and fungus-caused diseases
pomology - the branch of botany that studies and cultivates fruits
palaeobotany, paleobotany - the study of fossil plants
algology, phycology - the branch of botany that studies algae
pteridology - the branch of botany that studies ferns
dissilience - the emergence of seeds as seed pods burst open when they are ripe
aestivation, estivation - (botany) the arrangement of sepals and petals in a flower bud before it opens
division - (botany) taxonomic unit of plants corresponding to a phylum
venation - (botany) the arrangement of veins in a leaf
vernation - (botany) the arrangement of young leaves in a leaf bud before it opens
scurf - (botany) a covering that resembles scales or bran that covers some plant parts
natural scientist, naturalist - a biologist knowledgeable about natural history (especially botany and zoology)
kingdom Plantae, plant kingdom, Plantae - (botany) the taxonomic kingdom comprising all living or extinct plants
annual - (botany) a plant that completes its entire life cycle within the space of a year
biennial - (botany) a plant having a life cycle that normally takes two seasons from germination to death to complete; flowering biennials usually bloom and fruit in the second season
perennial - (botany) a plant lasting for three seasons or more
style - (botany) the narrow elongated part of the pistil between the ovary and the stigma
germ tube - (botany) a slender tubular outgrowth from a spore in germination
pollen tube - (botany) a slender tubular outgrowth from a pollen grain when deposited on the stigma for a flower; it penetrates the style and conveys the male gametes to the ovule
peristome - (botany) fringe of toothlike appendages surrounding the mouth of a moss capsule
embryo - (botany) a minute rudimentary plant contained within a seed or an archegonium
corolla - (botany) the whorl of petals of a flower that collectively form an inner floral envelope or layer of the perianth; "we cultivate the flower for its corolla"
corona - (botany) the trumpet-shaped or cup-shaped outgrowth of the corolla of a daffodil or narcissus flower
calyx - (botany) the whorl of sepals of a flower collectively forming the outer floral envelope or layer of the perianth enclosing and supporting the developing bud; usually green
lip - (botany) either of the two parts of a bilabiate corolla or calyx
papilla - (botany) a tiny outgrowth on the surface of a petal or leaf
pitcher - (botany) a leaf that that is modified in such a way as to resemble a pitcher or ewer
apophysis - (botany) a natural swelling or enlargement: at the base of the stalk or seta in certain mosses or on the cone scale of certain conifers
callus - (botany) an isolated thickening of tissue, especially a stiff protuberance on the lip of an orchid
blister - (botany) a swelling on a plant similar to that on the skin
coma - (botany) a usually terminal tuft of bracts (as in the pineapple) or tuft of hairs (especially on certain seeds)
phloem, bast - (botany) tissue that conducts synthesized food substances (e.g., from leaves) to parts where needed; consists primarily of sieve tubes
root - (botany) the usually underground organ that lacks buds or leaves or nodes; absorbs water and mineral salts; usually it anchors the plant to the ground
taproot - (botany) main root of a plant growing straight downward from the stem
spike - (botany) an indeterminate inflorescence bearing sessile flowers on an unbranched axis
leaf node, node - (botany) the small swelling that is the part of a plant stem from which one or more leaves emerge
lobe - (botany) a part into which a leaf is divided
ligule - (botany) any appendage to a plant that is shaped like a strap
apogamy - (botany) development of an embryo without fertilization; especially the development in some ferns of a sporophyte from the gametophyte without fertilization
cohesion - (botany) the process in some plants of parts growing together that are usually separate (such as petals)
foliation, leafing - (botany) the process of forming leaves
parthenocarpy - (botany) the development of a fruit without fertilization or seeds
growth regulator, phytohormone, plant hormone - (botany) a plant product that acts like a hormone
phellem, cork - (botany) outer tissue of bark; a protective layer of dead cells

botany

noun

Botany

Branches of botany  agrostology, algology, archaeobotany or archeobotany, astrobotany, bryology, carpology, dendrology, ethnobotany, floristics, mycology, palaeobotany, palaeoethnobotany, phytogenesis, phytogeography, phytography, phytopathology, pteridology
Botany terms  abscission, androecium, androgynous, anther, archegonium, auxin, axil, axis, berry, bulb, calyx, cambium, carpel, chlorophyll, chloroplast, corm, corolla, corona, cortex, cotyledon, cross-pollination, cuticle, dicotyledon, epidermis, filament, flower, foliation, fruit, geotropism, germination, guard cell, gynaecium, hilum, hydrotropism, inflorescence, insect pollination, integument, key, lamina, leaf, legume, lenticel, meristem, mesophyll, micropyle, monocotyledon, nastic movement, nut, operculum, ovary, ovule, palisade mesophyll, phloem, photosynthesis, phototropism, pistil, pith, plumule, pollen, pollination, raceme, radicle, receptacle, rhizome, root, root cap, root hair, root nodule, rosette, runner, sap, seed, seed capsule or seedcase, seed pod, seed vessel, self-pollination, sepal, shoot, spadix, spongy mesophyll, sporangium, spore, stamen, stem, stigma, stolon, stoma, style, testa, translocation, transpiration, tropism, tuber, vascular bundle, vegetative reproduction, wind pollination, xylem
Botanists  Joseph Banks (English), David (James) Bellamy (English), Robert Brown (Scottish), Auguste Pyrame de Candolle (Swiss), George Washington Carver (U.S.), Charles Robert Darwin (English), Hugo De Vries (Dutch), August Wilhelm Eichler (German), Joseph Dalton Hooker (English), William Jackson Hooker (English), Linnaeus (Carl von Linné) (Swedish), Gregor Johann Mendel (Austrian), John Ray (English), John Tradescant (English)
Translations
عِلْمِ النَّبات
ботаника
botanika
botanik
kasvitiede
botanika
grasafræîi
植物学植物生態
botanica
botanikabotanikasbotanikosbotanikos sodas
botānika
botanică
botanika
botanika
botanik
botaniaelimumime
botanikbitki bilimi
ботаніка

botany

[ˈbɒtənɪ] Nbotánica f

botany

[ˈbɒtəni] nbotanique f

botany

nBotanik f, → Pflanzenkunde f

botany

[ˈbɒtənɪ] nbotanica

botany

(ˈbotəni) noun
the scientific study of plants.
boˈtanic(al) (-ˈtӕ-) adjective
ˈbotanist noun
a person who studies botany.
botanic(al) gardens noun singular or plural
a public park for the growing of native and foreign plants.
References in classic literature ?
Botany cannot go farther than tell me the names of the shrubs which grow there--the high blueberry, panicled andromeda, lambkill, azalea, and rhodora--all standing in the quaking sphagnum.
She entered into a discourse on botany with the gentle Mrs.
come back from Botany Bay; and years have rolled away, and who's to gain by it?
The books were of the most varied kind, history, geography, politics, political economy, botany, geology, law, all relating to England and English life and customs and manners.
He first cast anchor at Botany Bay, visited the Friendly Isles, New Caledonia, then directed his course towards Santa Cruz, and put into Namouka, one of the Hapai group.
I was too ignorant of botany to discover any resort of root or fruit that might lie about me; I had no means of trapping the few rabbits upon the island.
It is a color very well known in botany, but till the present time very rare among horses.
The two favorite studies of my youth were botany and mineralogy, and subsequently, when I learned that the use of simples frequently explained the whole history of a people, and the entire life of individuals in the East, as flowers betoken and symbolize a love affair, I have regretted that I was not a man, that I might have been a Flamel, a Fontana, or a Cabanis.
Grimworth would have people coming from Botany Bay to settle in it, if things went on in this way.
Botany was, I knew, a favourite study of his: and these flowers were to me so entirely new and mysterious, that I was really curious to see what a botanist would say of them.
There would be nothing left for him as a profession except Botany or the Church.
He discoursed of botany and ethnology with unimpeachable inaccuracy, and his store of local legends - he had been a trusted agent of the State for fifteen years, remember - was inexhaustible.