boulder


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Boul·der

 (bōl′dər)
A city of north-central Colorado northwest of Denver. It is a major Rocky Mountains resort and the seat of the University of Colorado (opened 1877).

boul·der

also bowl·der  (bōl′dər)
n.
A large rounded mass of rock lying on the surface of the ground or embedded in the soil.

[Middle English bulder, of Scandinavian origin; see bhel- in Indo-European roots.]

boulder

(ˈbəʊldə)
n
1. (Geological Science) a smooth rounded mass of rock that has a diameter greater than 25cm and that has been shaped by erosion and transported by ice or water from its original position
2. (Geological Science) geology a rock fragment with a diameter greater than 256 mm and thus bigger than a cobble
[C13: probably of Scandinavian origin; compare Swedish dialect bullersten, from Old Swedish bulder rumbling + sten stone]
ˈbouldery adj

boul•der

(ˈboʊl dər)

n.
a detached and rounded or worn rock, esp. a large one.
[1610–20; Middle English bulderston < Scandinavian]

Boul•der

(ˈboʊl dər)

n.
a city in N Colorado. 75,990.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.boulder - a large smooth mass of rock detached from its place of originboulder - a large smooth mass of rock detached from its place of origin
glacial boulder - a boulder that has been carried by a glacier to a place far distant from its place of origin
river boulder - a boulder that has been carried by a river to a place remote from its place of origin
rock, stone - a lump or mass of hard consolidated mineral matter; "he threw a rock at me"
shore boulder - a boulder found on a shore remote from its place of origin
2.Boulder - a town in north central Colorado; Rocky Mountains resort center and university town
Centennial State, Colorado, CO - a state in west central United States in the Rocky Mountains
Translations
صَخْرَه، جَلْمود
balvan
rullesten
ŝtonego
järkälelohkare
szikla: nagy szikladarab/kő
akmuoriedulys
laukakmens
balvan
kaya kütlesi/parçası

boulder

[ˈbəʊldəʳ] Ncanto m rodado

boulder

[ˈbəʊldər] ngros rocher m (généralement lisse, arrondi)

boulder

nFelsblock m, → Felsbrocken m

boulder

[ˈbəʊldəʳ] nmasso, macigno

boulder

(ˈbəuldə) noun
a large rock or stone. a boulder on the hillside.
References in classic literature ?
I needed exercise, so I employed my agent in setting stranded logs and dead trees adrift, and I sat on a boulder and watched them go whirling and leaping head over heels down the boiling torrent.
They fled down the mountain sides, leaping from boulder to boulder like bucks.
In the centre of the space was a boulder some three or four feet high, and with a flat slab-like surface of some six feet or so.
Hee boulder now, uncall'd before her stood; But as in gaze admiring: Oft he bowd His turret Crest, and sleek enamel'd Neck, Fawning, and lick'd the ground whereon she trod.
So he went stumbling along now stepping into a deep hole, now stumbling over a boulder in a manner that threatened to unseat his rider or plunge them both clear under current.
When I told the Professor he shouted in glee like a schoolboy, and after looking intently till a snow fall made sight impossible, he laid his Winchester rifle ready for use against the boulder at the opening of our shelter.
I gather the larkspur Over the hillside, Blown mid the chaos Of boulder and bellbine; Hating the tyrant Who made me an outcast, Who of his leisure Now spares me no moment: Drinking the mountain spring, Shading at noon-day Under the cypress My limbs from the sun glare.
The leaded windows were bright and speckless, and the door-stone was as clean as a white boulder at ebb tide.
I go to rescue,' and Hurree, pounding down the slope, cast himself bodily upon the delighted and astonished Kim, who was banging his breathless foe's head against a boulder.
What Kaa did not know about the Middle Jungle, as they call it,--the life that runs close to the earth or under it, the boulder, burrow, and the tree-bole life,--might have been written upon the smallest of his scales.
On the front page of the illustrated paper I saw lying on a table near me, he looked picturesque enough, seated on a boulder, a big strong man with a square-cut beard, his hands resting on the hilt of a cavalry sabre - and all around him a landscape of savage mountains.
There was no difficulty about the direction in which I should return for all along I had kept the little brook upon my left, and it opened into the central lake within a stone's-throw of the boulder upon which I had been lying.